March, 2019
Sierra Toy Soldier Company

Sierra Toy Soldier Company

Today's Headlines

Missed the February Edition 2018 Newsletter, view it here!

Welcome to the March Edition of Sierra Toy Soldier News, written on a wet day here in the Bay Area. We have not been just getting rain but we have been getting what they call atmospheric rivers, from both Alaska and the Pacific. This results in a ton of rain, and lots of snow in the Sierra, up to 35 feet of new snow. Whilst this is great for the drought that will not happen this summer, it causes lots of problems due to flooding and mud slides. While we’re usually praying for rain, we’ve made too good a job of it.. As the song says, we need the warm California Sun.

Our Moving Sale has begin we started it on March 1. If you are planning a visit to the store we have terrific deals as we make space in our warehouse. We have lots of forgotten items, and some “scratch and dent” pieces. The thought of moving everything terrifies me, so please call into the store and see Aidan and Cody and I think you will leave as many have done with some tremendous bargains. Do not miss out.

As many of you are aware we are moving, just 10 minutes away from our current location and we are actively working on developing our showroom location. We will be in Campbell, CA. We look forward to hosting you there.

We have some great announcements from Britain's, King & Country, Collectors Showcase, and John Jenkins.

Check out our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more pictures.

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You can keep up to date with us by visiting our Facebook Page.

Sierra Toy Soldier Facebook Page

Sierra Toy Soldier Blog.

Hope to see you soon!

Sierra Blog
Britain's
King & Country
John Jenkins
Collectors Showcase

Retail Store

We are open Monday - Saturday 10.00 - 6.00pm. Sundays 12.00 - 5.00pm

Just a reminder for those of you living in Northern California, or perhaps just visiting, that our retail store dedicated to toy soldiers is now open 7 days a week. The store is located at 29 North Santa Cruz Avenue, Los Gatos, California 95030. (408) 395 3000 www.sierratoysoldier.com

 

Sierra Toy Soldier Facebook Page

Check out our latest arrivals, new dioramas and events at our store!

Sierra Toy Soldier Facebook Page

Sierra Toy Soldier Blog

Check out all the latest announcements. This is updated as soon as there is a new announcement.

Sierra Toy Soldier Blog

Collectors Corner

Occasionally we get a rare opportunity to acquire individual items and complete collections for collectors that are thinning out their collection or from other dealers. These pieces are items that we do not normally stock. All are in mint condition or and in their original boxes, unless specified in the description. Please note these may have been on display.

So these are ideal pages to view if you are looking for that missing piece in your collection or just looking to find some very unique pieces that are not normally available.

Consignment Highlight

This month we have added to our consignment corner many King & Country and John Jenkins. Arriving early next week, we have some magnificent Frontline American Civil War Sets.

Collectors Corner

Sierra Toy Soldier Exclusive

Sierra Toy Soldier Exclusive with King & Country.
Wojtek the Bear - Available Now! - Final Sets Remaining!

Sierra Toy Soldier Exclusive with King & Country. First Edition of 300!

Monte Cassino

Britain's

Britain's New Releases - Expected Late March 2019!
Museum Collection

Expected Late March 2019!

Museum Collection

Jack Tars

Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection

Clash of Empires

Clash of Empires

American Civil War

American Civil War

Norseman

Wrath of the Norseman

Zulu Wars

Battle of Isandlwana, 22 January, 1879

Good Soldier - Coffee Mug

The Good Soldier

King & Country

King & Country March Releases!

A WINTER WARRIOR

Most armies, given the choice, prefer NOT to fight their wars and battles in wintertime... It’s cold, miserable, damp and the daylight hours can be very short.

All that being said the decision where, and importantly, when armies ‘take to the field’ is usually left for their commanders to decide.

Two of the most uncomfortable locations to fight a winter battle or a campaign in was the Eastern Front between 1942 and 1945 and the Ardennes Forest in December 1944.

As many collectors know the Sturmgeschutz Ⅲ more commonly referred to as the StuGⅢ was Germany’s second most-produced armoured fighting vehicle during World War 2.

Built on the chassis of the already-proven PanzerⅢ, it replaced the Panzer turret with an armoured, fixed superstructure mounting a more powerful 7.5cm main gun. This was originally intended as a mobile assault gun for direct-fire infantry support. Later, the StuGⅢ adopted in addition another role, similar to that of the Jagdpanzer... tank destroyer!

As secondary armament the StuGⅢ mounted the tried and tested MG34 machine gun complete with protective shield.

Approximately 10,000 StuGⅢ’s of various types were built between 1942 and 1945 with the vast majority being supplied to the Wehrmacht. Small numbers were however sold to Finland, Romania, Bulgaria, Spain and Hungary. A few even turned up in Syria and took part in the 1967 Arab / Israeli War.

This “winterized” StuGⅢ has been given by its crew a ‘winter whitewash’ coat of camouflage and could be placed somewhere in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944... or perhaps on the Russian Front in the latter half of WW2.

SPECIAL NOTE: Just 200 of this version are available and each one comes with a well-wrapped up vehicle commander scanning the horizon for any enemy activity.

Battle of the Bulge

ROMANS & BARBARIANS

  • - This Centurion, sword in hand, is taking no chances with this captured Celtic warrior. Although trussed up in a heavy wooden stock some prisoners are capable of anything even when ‘locked-up’ in this manner.
  • - A kneeling Gallic prisoner is told to pay attention and watch the fate of other Roman captives as they are being punished.
  • - Spear held aloft and ready to be thrown at the hated Roman invaders this mounted Gaul is not impressed by the might of Rome.
  • - Totally unafraid this Gaul charges towards the enemy.
  • - Sword in one hand, shield in the other, this red-haired Celt screams defiance at the enemy.

Romans

RETURN TO THE ALAMO

SIX additional reinforcements for the beleaguered garrison still holding off Santa Anna’s army at the little mission in San Antonio, Texas.

  • - One of Davy Crockett’s backwoods volunteers who journeyed with him to Texas to join the fight for Texan independence.
  • - This Pennsylvania native was born in 1800 and moved to Texas in 1835. He took part in the siege of Bexar and became part of the Alamo garrison where he perished on the morning of March 6, 1836.
  • - Micajah Autry, originally from North Carolina was born in 1793 and fought previously in the War of 1812. A well-read and educated man he had been a farmer, teacher and a lawyer before enlisting in the ‘Volunteer Auxiliary Corps of Texas’ in early 1836 just in time to take part in the Alamo struggle. Here he carries one of several flags that are said to have flown over the Alamo itself... This one was the Mexican tricolor complete with ‘1824’ sewn in black in the middle of the tricolour’s white strip. Like all the other defenders he died on the morning of March 6.
  • - Tom Millar was a member of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers. Under the command of Lieut. George C. Kimble and Capt. Albert Martin, Millar and 30 other men successfully passed through Santa Anna’s besieging army and galloped into the Alamo on February 23, 1836 never to leave.
  • - Another horseman of the Gonzales Ranging Company armed only with a pistol.
  • - Originally born in England he moved to Texas from Mississippi where he had been a farmer. At the Alamo he was a member of Capt. William Carey’s artillery company. Here, however, he’s taken up his musket to fire at the attacking Mexican infantry.

Remember the Alamo

THE KING’S GERMANS

For 13 years between 1803 and 1816, there was one major British Army unit that primarily consisted of German expatriates... The King’s German Legion.

Under overall British command the Legion earned the unique distinction of being the only German military force to fight without interruption against the French during the Napoleonic Wars!

After the occupation of Hanover by Napoleon’s troops in 1803 many former Hanoverian officers and soldiers fled to Britain where GeorgeⅢ King of Great Britain was also Elector of Hanover.

The King sanctioned a volunteer corps of all arms infantry, artillery and cavalry to be raised and named them, ‘The King’s German Legion’.

Soon, it grew to a strength of 14,000 officers and men and played a vital role in Britain’s defeat of the French emperor.

Among the Legion’s most famous regiments were two Regiments of Light Dragoons. Here, for the first time, are King & Country’s mounted tribute to these fine German horsemen.

  •   - Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • - Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • - You can almost hear the shout as this particular Dragoon charges forward to engage the opposition sabre held menacingly over his head.
  • - This Dragoon rests his sabre on his shoulder as he prepares to change from the gallup to the full charge.

The King's German Legion

Vietnam

Here are some great-looking USMC reinforcements fighting their way into the old Imperial capital.

  • - Cautiously edging forward this ‘Grunt’ takes a look at what is just around the corner...
  • - Another Marine is also interested in seeing what’s just around the next corner.
  • - One hand stretched back to tell his buddies to halt this Marine is watching and waiting.
  • - In the close-quarter fighting that took place all over HUE the M72 LAW (Light Anti Tank Weapon) proved invaluable at taking out enemy bunkers, buildings and machine gun ‘nests’... One shot... One kill!
  • - War dogs could be trained to sniff-out explosives or uncover hidden exits and entrances to underground bunkers and tunnels. This Marine handler and his German Shepherd seem to be on the trail of something... or someone.

Vietnam - Tet'68

Streets of Old Hong Kong

  • - This three-level façade is typical of the kind of general food store that used to be found all over Hong Kong and other Chinese cities. On display are various kinds of ‘smoked and cured meats’ as well as large display buckets of different types of rice... the main staple of many Asian diets.
  • - The perfect ‘companion piece’ for HK283, or indeed any of our traditional Chinese Shop / House facades. Our grocer is dressed in the style of a late 19th Century, businessman... prosperous to show that he is successful but not ‘too prosperous’ to reveal that he might be charging too much for his goods and services!!!

Orient

John Jenkins

New Releases Expected March 2019!
American Revolution - NEILSON’S FARMHOUSE.

A young and ambitious John Neilson came to this area in 1772 from just outside Elizabeth, NJ. He went to work in the village of Stillwater, two miles south of the house, on the farm of Abner Quitterfield. Only three years later, in 1775, he leased 150 acres of land, and ‘married the boss’s daughter,’ Lydia. Within a year or two, they built this small house on the lot he had leased.

In 1777, a British army was invading southward from Canada into New York. Their route would take them through the Neilsons’ back yard. John took Lydia and their possessions to the safety of her parents’ home in Stillwater. He then exchanged his home for a tent, serving with his local militia regiment—some of whom would be encamped nearby.

American army officers moved into his empty house on September 12, 1777. About ten miles north, British forces steadily descended the Hudson River Valley as American troops hastily built menacing defenses 3/4 of a mile east on Bemus Heights—a ridge of bluffs overlooking the Hudson. The American army used this house as a divisional and brigade headquarters. Ephraim Woodworth’s house, 1/2 mile south of Neilson’s, was headquarters for the American army commanding general, Horatio Gates.

The only account from the time of the battles says General Enoch Poor of New Hampshire and General Benedict Arnold of Connecticut were quartered here.

Fighting came within about one mile of this house. As Gates’ army moved on, though, they left behind a farm in near-ruins. John and Lydia returned shortly after the army’s departure and began restoring the farm. Their crops had been ravaged, and their fields torn up. John filed a damage claim in May 1778, in the amount of £100 (about three times a soldier’s annual salary), but he was not reimbursed.

The Neilsons continued with their family life, eventually having eight children. As the family grew, a small house would no longer do; the first U.S. Census from 1790 lists eleven people living here. By 1830, they had built a larger, two-story home.

By the 1890s, they had pushed back the original part of the house and added a carriage barn.

This house is based on the reproduction of Neilson,s Farmhouse, now standing in the grounds of the SARATOGA BATTLEFIELD NATIONAL PARK.

The model can be suitable for the French Indian War, American Revolution, and of course the American Civil War.

The model has a lift off roof, with basic interior detail, and a front door which can be opened or closed..

Drums along the Mohawk

MORGAN’S RIFLEMEN

Morgans Riflemen

THE 1st CANADIAN REGIMENT

1st Canadian Regiment

THE AZTEC EMPIRE

This Aztec chieftain wears a sleeveless corselet called an “ehuatl”, which was a garment of feather-covered cloth worn over cotton armour. Senior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of blue feathers. Junior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of red feathers.

Additional armour was provided by greaves, armbands and wristlets, and a helmet made from wood, and bone which was ornately decorated with feathers.

The greaves and armbands were generally made of gilded leather, bark or thin gold.

This figure does not carry a standard on the back, instead has a “skin drum”. These drums were used to transmit certain orders on the battlefield.

Aztec Empire

THE TLAXCALTECS

The Tlaxcalans, or Talaxcaltecs, are an indigenous group of Nahua ethnicity who inhabited the republic of Tlaxcala and present-day Mexican state of Tlaxcala.

Despite early attempts by the Mexica, the Tlaxcalteca were never conquered by the Aztec Triple Alliance. The Aztecs allowed them to maintain their independence so that they could participate in the xochiyaoyatl (flower wars) with them to facilitate human sacrifice

The Tlaxcaltecs served as allies to Hernán Cortés and his fellow Spanish conquistadors, and were instrumental in the invasion of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire, helping the Spanish reach the Valley of Anahuac and providing a key contingent of the invasion force

A flower war or flowery war (Nahuatl languages: xōchiyāōyōtl, Spanish: guerra florida) was a ritual war fought intermittently between the Aztec Triple Alliance and its enemies from the "mid-1450s to the arrival of the Spaniards in 1519.

The Aztecs practiced human sacrifice. Most of the people sacrificed were not residents of the Aztec’s major cities, rather they were captured in wars, both wars of conquest and “wars of the flowers”. The Aztec term for wars for captives was Xochiyayoyotl.

The Xochiyayoyotl came about after a long famine, from 1450 to 1454. Crops failed all over the Valley of Mexico due to bad weather. To the Aztecs, it showed the gods were displeased; they needed more blood and human hearts. Montezuma I reigned during the great famine. His brother Tlacaelel was Montezuma’s Snake Woman or first adviser, a general in the Aztec army and of the highest warrior order, the Shorn Ones.

When bad weather continued the famine, Tlacaelel suggested a ritual or ceremonial war to provide captives for sacrifice for the Aztecs and their enemies. The nearby Tlaxcala were the Triple Alliance’s main enemy. They had also experienced the famine. Through human sacrifice, the gods would be assuaged for both sides.

Though there were undoubtedly more reasons for Flower wars, such as further terrorizing the surrounding areas, they began during the great famine. Tenochtitlan reached an agreement with its enemies the Tlaxcala, Cholula and Huejotzingo, to war for captives. Their warriors would be told not to kill enemy warriors, but to capture them. Once each side had enough captives, the battle would end. The captured warriors would then be taken for sacrifice by both sides in the battle.

Thus, from time to time, Aztecs would arrange a Flower war when the need for human captives arose. In essence, these were ceremonial in nature, with all the details arranged beforehand by the leaders involved. Nevertheless, they were still a matter of life and death for the warriors; to be captured meant being sacrificed. While a sacrifice was considered an honorable death, no doubt most warriors would prefer to avoid it.

Whether a Flower war was arranged simply to satisfy religious demands for sacrificial victims, to train young warriors and to ensure social advancement for warriors or if it had underlying purposes of wearing down the enemy and terrorizing neighboring lands is still debated by scholars.

Some scholars maintain that the Flower wars were more like tournaments, with no more political purpose than to satisfy warriors in vying for advancement and provide ritual bloodletting and sacrifices. Other scholars see darker political aspects to these ritual wars: to demonstrate Aztec might, to wear down the enemy through attrition and to allow Aztec leaders to subjugate their own people through fear of losing loved ones.

The Aztecs had never managed to conquer the Tlaxcala. While the Tlaxcala were also Aztecs, they refused to pay tribute to the Triple Alliance. Montezuma might have thought that through the Flower wars, the Triple Alliance would be able to wear down the Tlaxcala and capture more of their warriors than they could afford to lose. If so, the Tlaxcala delivered the final blow: they allied with the Spanish in conquering and defeating the Aztec Empire.

Many sources depict high status warriors wearing the distinctive back ornaments of their communities. The great white heron represented the house of Tizatlan. The “Tlahuiztli” is covered in large yellow feathers, and the warrior wears the red and white headband which was an attribute of Tlaxcallan nationality.

Talaxcaltecs

SPANISH CONQUISTADORS

The Spanish were known to have had four falconets and ten brass lombards with them when they first landed in 1519. Spanish gunners had a poor reputation, and crews were mainly made up of seamen, and a mix of foreigners from Italy, Netherlands and Portugal.

Conquistadors

THE ROMAN ARMY OF THE LATE REPUBLIC

Republican Romans

GERMANIC WARRIORS

Following two decades of Roman occupation, Germania Magna erupted into revolt in AD 9, resulting in the stunning loss of three Roman legions to an alliance of Germanic nations at Teutoburg. The Battle of the Teutoburg Fores, described as the Varian Disaster by Roman historians, took place in the Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions and their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus.

The alliance was led by Arminius, a Germanic officer of Varus' auxilia. Arminius had acquired Roman citizenship and had received a Roman military education, which enabled him to deceive the Roman commander methodically and anticipate the Roman army's tactical responses.

Despite several successful campaigns and raids by the Romans in the years after the battle, they never again attempted to conquer the Germanic territories east of the Rhine river. The victory of the Germanic tribes against Rome's legions in the Teutoburg Forest would have far-reaching effects on the subsequent history of both the ancient Germanic peoples and the Roman Empire. Contemporary and modern

historians have generally regarded Arminius' victory over Varus as "Rome's greatest defeat", one of the most decisive battles recorded in military history, and as "a turning-point in world history"

The Cherusci nation, was a Germanic tribe that fought at the Teutoburg Pass, Weser River, Idistaviso and the Agrivarian Wall under its war chief Arminius. These warriors were perfectly equipped for the Germanic landscape of open fields, forests and swamps. The weapons which were used included the long lance or Framea, which could be swung, thrust or thrown at an opponent.

Hair was grown long and often tied up in a figure of eight or “Suebian” knot.

In the Cherusci warrior the Roman Legionary met a formidable opponent. The Germanic warrior was a well trained, battle-hardened, combat ready and motivated fighter, who excelled in irregular warfare, ambushes, raids and petty warfare. In an ambush the lightly armed Germanic fighter could decisively defeat a heavily equipped legionary by using surprise and the terrain to his advantage.

In a set-piece battle the German could stand up to the Roman Leginary discipline and formations for a while, but in close quarters combat the advantage eventually shifted to the legionary, as at the Battle of Idistaviso, and the Angrivarian Wall.

Enemies of Rome

THRACIANS

Thracians

John Jenkins

John Jenkins ROMAN, PONTOON BRIDGE

Roman-designed pontoon bridges, constructed mostly during wartime for the shock and awe of quick raids, and were a specialty of Julius Caesar's.

In 55 B.C., he built a pontoon bridge that was around 437 yards (400 meters) long to cross the Rhine river, which was traditionally thought by the Germanic tribes to be safely out of reach of Roman power.

Roman leader Caligula is well-known for his brief stint as the emperor of Rome, from 37 AD through 41 AD. Some say that Caligula displayed signs of madness during his reign. According to historical accounts, one of these displays of madness was Caligula’s demand for the construction of a floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae so that he could ride triumphantly across it. Some historians dispute the building of this bridge. With differing accounts of exactly what happened during Caligula’s reign as emperor, we may never know whether the floating bridge of Baiae was actually constructed, but it remains a lasting story of power, madness, and what happens when the two intertwine.

Please note this is for sale on a pre order basis only. Pre Order period ends March 31st, 2019. Do not miss out.

Roman Pontoon Bridge

Collectors Showcase

New March Releases!
American Revolution

American Revolution

Pavloski Grenadiers

Napoleonic - Pavloski Grenadiers

MasterWorks 1/6 Scale

Our Vietnam grunt says it all: gritty, tough treading lightly through the bush. This limited edition piece stands 12" tall and is made of heavy polyresin with metal fixtures. Beautifully painted and weathered.

Masterworks Collection

Roman / Medieval

Limited edition Roman Siege Tower stands an imposing 13.25" tall. Complete with interior ladders, open and close ramp doors, battering ram. Perfect for the Roman period or Knights!

Roman

Very best regards from Mike & Myszka Hall and the Sierra Toy Soldier team - Aidan, Barbara, Christian, Cody, Gary, Howard, and Michael (the Kilted Vampire).

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