New John Jenkins February Releases!

Gauls




Enemies of Rome

Aztec


The War suit, called an OCELOTOTEC, was woven to resemble an animal skin.

In the case of noblemen, this was made from feathers.

Men of non-noble birth attaining the rank of Jaguar warrior, usually had to make do with suits made from actual skins. These usually had the clawed paws around the wrists and ankles.

Otherwise Jaguar War Suits came in a variety of colours, mainly blue , but also yellow , red and white.

In most armies uniforms are used to differentiate units. In the Aztec army uniforms served to differentiate men with different levels of military experience within the same unit.

Rank descriptions in uniforms between warriors depended on how many captives each individual hed taken. A soldier who succeded in capturing four of the enemy was awarded a Jaguar suit and helmet.

It was believed that to capture an enemy, honored their gods in a way far greater than killing enemy soldiers in the battlefield. For a warrior to kill an enemy was considered clumsy.

The captured prisoners were offered as a sacrifice to the Aztec gods.

The jaguar motif was used due to the belief that the jaguar represented Tezcatlipoca, god of the night sky. Aztecs also wore these dresses at war because they believed the animal’s strengths would be given to them during battles

Following the warrior’s path was one of the few ways to change one’s social status in Aztec culture. Eagle and Jaguar warriors were full-time warriors who worked for the city-state to protect merchants and the city itself. They were expected to be leaders and commanders both on and off the battlefield, and acted as sort of a police force for the city. Men who reached this rank were considered as nobles and elites of society, and were granted many of the same privileges as a noble.

The mighty Aztec warrior priests were not only important figures in society but also fearsome warriors who were more than capable of wielding a macuahuitl with deadly intent on the battlefield.

In normal life Aztec priests would be responsible for many tasks, and often occupied high positions in society. They would be the life and blood of the Aztec religion, but also worked in government, created calenders, and were the primary record keepers. In addition they would teach in the schools and warrior training structures like the Calmecac and the Telpochocalli.

As a warrior priest however their role was different, they would fight alongside the Aztec warriors blow for blow. The warrior priests were armed with weaponry capable of inflicting severe injury, and they were protected with armour and shields and were more than capable or holding their ground.

Among the Aztecs a priest who had captured six of the enemy wore a Cayote suit. The TLECOYOTL or “fire cayote” had prominent red/orange macaw feather “flames” over the whole suit.



Aztec Empire – Conquest of America

French Militia


**PLEASE NOTE THAT THE BASES FOR THESE FIGURES ARE SEPARATE, ALLOWING THEM TO BE USED AS CANOE CREWS, OR WITH OTHER MILITIA FIGURES.**



French Militia 1759

Knights Of The Skies


The importance of motorbikes during the Great War is all too often overlooked. Motorbikes were used for mounted infantry, scouts, dispatch and courier duties, ammunition carriers, medical supply carriers and casualty evacuation. The versatility of these machines clearly helped them play a hugely significant role in the logistics of the war, far more than the automobile.

The use that they were most commonly used for was that of the messenger. Because of the unreliability of communications technology during the war years, the motorbike’s virtue of speed meant that orders, reports and maps could be transferred between units quickly.

It was not only the men who got to ride around on motorbikes. The Women’s Royal Flying Corps made extensive use of motorbikes. The initial aim of the WRAF was to provide female mechanics so that men could be free to serve in the armed forces. Thanks to the high number of women volunteers, many also filled driver positions as well.

Douglas was a British motorcycle manufacturer from 1907–1957 based in Kingswood, Bristol, owned by the Douglas family, and especially known for its horizontally opposed twin cylinder engined bikes and as manufacturers of speedway machines. The company also built a range of cars between 1913 and 1922. During WW1 some 70,000 of these 349cc twin horizontal cylinder machines were produced for the British military.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Battle of Gallipoli


Billy Sing was an elite sniper from Australia and his “duel” with his opposite number from Turkey called Abdul the Terrible, became the basis of Ion Idriess book

“Lurking Death; The Stories of Snipers in Gallipoli, Sinai and Palestine”.

“Abdul the Sniper was the pride of the Turkish Army. They named his rifle ‘The Mother of Death’. Because, so declared the Ottoman Guard, ‘her breech gives birth to bullets which destroy the lives of men’,” Idriess wrote.

One of the Turkish snipers victims was Private John Simpson Kirkpatrick, “the man with the donkey”. A party of “counter-snipers” led by Lieutenant Thomas Grace, Wellington Battalion NZEF, were briefed to take on the Turkish marksmen.

Each sharpshooter had an observer or spotter with a telescope.

An equally terrible Australian sniper emerged who day by day killed man after man. The Australian sniper was trooper Billy Sing from Queensland of the 5th Light Horse. Abdul the Terrible was ordered to locate and kill him.

Idriess says he was one day acting as a spotter for Sing. He writes: “How many enemy this particular sniper shot will never be known but in three months his tally was one hundred and fifty.”

Adbul the Terrible would apparently examine any man who was shot through the head to try to establish the trajectory of the bullet and the likely location of the sniper from whom it was fired. His calculations led him to believe the shots were coming from one spot nearly on top of a trench across on Chatham’s Post.At night Abdul began to dig his cunning fox hole into which he would climb before dawn to lay there all day, staring across at Chatham’s Post.

As Idriess tells it, Abdul ignored other tempting targets but for a long time could not locate Sing, until one evening he reported to the officer in charge. “I have found him. I will kill him tomorrow.”

The next day, according to the account, another Anzac climbed into Sing’s hideout or “possy” but instinct apparently told Abdul this wasn’t the real man he was after and he, accordingly, withheld his fire.

Then Sing got into the possy and his observer suddenly alerted him not to open the loophole. Sing looked through the telescope.

“Thus the Australian sniper stared into Abdul the Terrible’s eyes,” according to the text.

What happened next can only be left to Idriess

“The sniper, with his finger, slid back the loophole cover hardly an inch, then cautiously poked his rifle muzzle through…

“Careful,” murmured the observer. “He’s got the eyes of an eagle and – he’s staring straight here.”

“It’s me or him,” grunted Sing.

“But had Abdul fired, even had his bullet come through that tiny slit, it wouldn’t have hit the sniper, for the born sniper knows the crouch that means the fractional difference between life and death. Only when the sniper actually had his eye aligned with his rifle sights then –

“That was what Abdul was waiting for. His big eyes staring, his rifle-muzzle slowly rising up… But Abdul did not know that the Australian sniper had seen him.

“Gently the peephole widened, then stopped close around the rifle. Abdul waited with finger on trigger, just awaiting that loophole to open the least fraction more. And – a bullet took him between the eyes.”

The Australian War Memorial states that the Turkish army immediately retaliated, aiming its heavy artillery at Billy’s hiding position and completely destroying it. Fortunately for the Australian sniper and his spotter, they had already evacuated to their unit trenches.



Battle of Gallipoli 1915

INTER-WAR AVIATION




Inter-War Aviation Collection

GERMAN ARMOUR


The first tank crew figures for the Panzer I’s are now available

The Panzer I was a light tank produced in Germany in the 1930s. The name is short for the German Panzerkampfwagen I (“armored fighting vehicle mark I”), abbreviated PzKpfw I. The tank’s official German ordnance inventory designation was SdKfz 101 (“special purpose vehicle 101”).

Design of the Panzer I began in 1932 and mass production began in 1934. Intended only as a training tank to introduce the concept of armored warfare to the German Army, the Panzer I saw combat in Spain during the Spanish Civil War, in Poland, France, the Soviet Union and North Africa during the Second World War, and in China during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Experiences with the Panzer I during the Spanish Civil War helped shape the German Panzerwaffes’ invasion of Poland in 1939 and France in 1940. By 1941, the Panzer I chassis design was used as the basis of tank destroyers and assault guns. There were attempts to upgrade the Panzer I throughout its service history, including by foreign nations, to extend the design’s lifespan. It continued to serve in the Spanish Armed Forces until 1954.

The Panzer I’s performance in combat was limited by its thin armour and light armament of two machine guns. As a design intended for training, the Panzer I was not as capable as other light tanks of the era, such as the Soviet T-26. Although weak in combat, it formed a large part of Germany’s tank forces and was used in all major campaigns between September 1939 and December 1941. The small, vulnerable light tank would be surpassed in importance by other German tanks, such as the Panzer IV, Panther, and Tiger; nevertheless, the Panzer I’s contribution to the early victories of Nazi Germany during World War II was significant.

Lesson learned from the Panzerkampfwagen I provided the German designers and manufacturers with valuable experience in designing and producing the next generation of new panzers that were soon to come. Although, Panzerkampfwagen I was not a truly valuable combat tank, it proved to be an excellent training tank and most of the panzer crews were trained on Panzerkampfwagen I until the end of the war or operated it in combat as their first armoured vehicle


JJ WWII
Collection

WWII Collection


Air operations aboard carriers included a wide variety of jobs. In addition to the plane crews, a large number of support personnel were required to keep the planes flying.

These included mechanics, ordnancemen, plane handlers, firefighters, catapult crews and medical teams.

Without them and their dedication to getting the job done, the carriers and their air groups would not have succeeded.

Men whose duties required them to work on the carrier’s flight deck wore brightly coloured shirts for two reasons.

The flight deck was a potentially dangerous place, especially when planes were being launched or recovered. Anyone not wearing a colour coded shirt didn’t belong on the flight deck during operationsThe colour coded shirts also indicated the specific job speciality of the men who wore them.

A U.S. Navy Aircraftcarrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

Life on the flight deck is dangerous and taxing. Spinning propellers, grease everywhere, and a stiff sea wind that never stops are just a few of the things that must be endured for many hours at a time. The night and bad weather throw a whole other set of problems into the mix.

Yellow shirts are worn by aircraft handlers and aircraft directors that shuttle aircraft around the carrier’s tight and chaotic deck.

Plane Handlers, who work under the direction of the yellow shirt wearing aircraft handlers, assist in moving aircraft around the deck, they were also responsible for placing and removing wheel chocks, and lashing and securing parked planes. They also can operate the carrier’s massive aircraft elevators, drive tractors and work as messengers and verbal liaisons.


JJ WWII Collection

Knights of the Skies




Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Future Release – Corsair


The crew and upcoming Corsair can fit on a single BH-100 Carrier Base, and be displayed on a standard bookshelf.

**PLEASE NOTE THE FIRST OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR PLANES, WHICH CAN BE USED WITH THE CARRIER DECKS WILL BE AVAILABLE SHORTLY AFTER THE CHINESE NEW YEARS HOLIDAY**


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