New John Jenkins June Releases!

Knights of the Skies


The Airco DH.2 was a single-seat biplane “pusher” aircraft which operated as a fighter during the First World War. It was the second pusher design by Geoffrey de Havilland for Airco, based on his earlier DH.1 two-seater. The DH.2 was the first effectively armed British single-seat fighter and enabled Royal Flying Corps (RFC) pilots to counter the “Fokker Scourge” that had given the Germans the advantage in the air in late 1915. Until the British developed a synchronisation gear to match the German system, pushers such as the DH.2 and the F.E.2b carried the burden of fighting and escort duties.

This was the plane flown by Maj. Hawker on 23rd November 1916, when he had his fateful encounter with Ltn Manfred Von Richthofen of Jasta 2.

**PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO THE STRUCTURAL POSITION OF THE UNDERCARRIAGE THE NORMAL FLIGHT STAND SCREWS AND WASHERS WILL NOT BE SUITABLE. A SPECIAL NEW LONGER SCREW AND WASHER WILL BE INCLUDED IN EACH SET. THESE CAN BE USED WITH ANY OF THE FLIGHT STANDS.**



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Battle of Gallipoli 1915


In 1914, all infantry battalions, and Mounted Rifles Regiments were equipped with a machine gun section of two guns, which was increased to four in February 1915.

Machine guns inflicted appalling casualties in World War One. Men who went over-the-top in trenches stood little chance when the enemy opened up with their machine guns. Machine guns were one of the main killers in the war and accounted for many thousands of deaths.


Battle of Gallipoli 1915

Raid on St Francis




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Provincial Regiments




Provincial Regiments 1759

Jacobite Rebellion 1745




Jacobite Rebellion 1745

War of the Roses


Rhys ap Thomas (1449–1525),is a Welsh name meaning, Rhys son of Thomas, and was a Welsh soldier and landholder who rose to prominence during the Wars of the Roses, and was instrumental in the victory of Henry Tudor at the Battle of Bosworth. He remained a faithful supporter of Henry and was rewarded with lands and offices in South Wales. Some sources claim that he personally delivered the death blow to King Richard III at Bosworth with his poleaxe.

Rhys ap Thomas had declined to support Buckingham’s earlier uprising. In the aftermath, when Richard appointed officers to replace those who had joined the revolt, he made Rhys ap Thomas his principal lieutenant in south west Wales and granted him an annuity for life of 40 marks. Rhys was required to send his son Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Thomas to the King’s court at Nottingham as a hostage, but he excused himself from this obligation by claiming that nothing could bind him to his duty more strongly than his conscience. He is supposed to have taken an oath that
“Whoever ill-affected to the state, shall dare to land in those parts of Wales where I have any employment under your majesty, must resolve with himself to make his entrance and irruption over my belly.”

On 1 August 1485, Henry set sail from Harfleur in France. With fair winds, he landed at Mill Bay near Dale on the north side of Milford Haven, close to his birthplace in Pembroke Castle, with a force of English exiles and French mercenaries. At this point, Rhys should have engaged him. However, Rhys instead joined Henry. Folklore has it that the Bishop of St. David’s offered to absolve him from his previous oath to Richard. The Bishop also suggested that Rhys fulfil the strict letter of his vow by lying down and letting Henry step over him. This undignified procedure might have weakened Rhys’s authority over his men, so instead, Rhys is said to have stood under the Mullock Bridge about 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Dale while Henry marched over it.

Henry’s and Rhys’s forces marched separately through Wales, with Rhys recruiting 500 men as he proceeded. They rejoined at Welshpool before crossing into England. Rhys’s Welsh force was described as being large enough to have “annihilated” the rest of Henry’s army. On 22 August, they met Richard’s army near Market Bosworth. In the resulting Battle of Bosworth, Richard launched an attack led by John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. According to a contemporary ballad, Rhys’s men halted the assault. “Norfolk’s line began to break under pressure from Rhys ap Thomas’s men” and the Duke was killed by an arrow shot. Hoping to turn the tide and win the battle rapidly by killing his rival, Richard and his companion knights charged directly at Henry. The king was unhorsed and surrounded. The poet Guto’r Glyn implies that Rhys himself was responsible for killing Richard, possibly with a poll axe. Referring to Richard’s emblem of a boar, the poet writes that Rhys “killed the boar, shaved his head” (“Lladd y baedd, eilliodd ei ben”). However, this may only mean that one of Rhys’s Welsh halberdiers killed the king, since the Burgundian chronicler Jean Molinet, says that a Welshman, one of Rhys’ men suspected to be Wyllyam Gardynyr, struck the death-blow with a halberd. Guto’r Glyn himself says that Rhys was “like the stars of a shield with the spear in their midst on a great steed” (“A Syr Rys mal sŷr aesaw, Â’r gwayw’n eu mysg ar gnyw mawr”). He was knighted on the field of battle.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

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