New John Jenkins January Releases!

Knights of the Skies


The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918.

In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft.

The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.

Carl “Charly” Degelow (5 January 1891 – 9 November 1970) Pour le Merite, Royal House Order of Hohenzollern, Iron Cross, was a German fighter pilot during World War I. He was credited with 30 victories, and was the last person to win the military Pour le Merite.

The fuselage of Carl Degelow’s early production Albatros built Fokker DVII features the white stag logo of “Dr. Lahmann’s Sanatorium” in Dresden, where Degelow had spent time recuperating from an arm wound he received in 1915 while serving in the infantry.

To find out more about Carl Degelow, the book “BLACK FOKKER LEADER” by Peter Kilduff, is highly recommended.


Otto Kissenberth (26 February 1893 – 2 August 1919) was a German flying ace of World War I credited with 20 aerial victories. He was a prewar mechanical engineer who joined the German air service in 1914. After being trained and after serving as a reconnaissance pilot, he became one of the first German fighter pilots, flying with Kampfeinsitzerkommando (Combat Single-Seater Command) KEK Einsisheim. He scored six victories with this unit as it morphed into a fighter squadron, Jagdstaffel 16. His success brought him command of Jagdstaffel 23 on 4 August 1917. He would run his victory tally to 20, downing his final victim using a captured British Sopwith Camel on 20 May 1918. Nine days later, a crash while flying the Camel ended Kissenberth’s combat career. His injuries were severe enough he was not returned to combat, instead being assigned to command Schleissheim’s flying school. Although Otto Kissenberth survived the war, he died soon after in a mountaineering accident on 2 August 1919.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

WWI – French Army




French Army

Raid on St Francis


The militia/frontiersman spirit derives from an early American dependence on arms to protect themselves from foreign armies and hostile Native Americans. Survival depended upon everyone being capable of using a weapon.

Prior to the American Revolution there was neither budget nor manpower nor government desire to maintain a full-time army. Therefore, the armed citizen-soldier carried the responsibility. Service in militia, including providing one’s own ammunition and weapons, was mandatory for all men.

Firearms therefore played a vital role in American settlement and expansion, therefore American women were no stranger to their use, and even competent in the manufacture and repair of weapons.

Both the necessity to hunt and the need for protection from the sometimes hostile native culture, made the use of firearms a crucial component in the settlement of America.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

French Militia




French Militia 1759

Leave a Reply