Archive for March, 2019

New John Jenkins April Releases!

Thursday, March 21st, 2019

ROMAN, PONTOON BRIDGE

Roman-designed pontoon bridges, constructed mostly during wartime for the shock and awe of quick raids, and were a specialty of Julius Caesar’s.

In 55 B.C., he built a pontoon bridge that was around 437 yards (400 meters) long to cross the Rhine river, which was traditionally thought by the Germanic tribes to be safely out of reach of Roman power.

Roman leader Caligula is well-known for his brief stint as the emperor of Rome, from 37 AD through 41 AD. Some say that Caligula displayed signs of madness during his reign. According to historical accounts, one of these displays of madness was Caligula’s demand for the construction of a floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae so that he could ride triumphantly across it. Some historians dispute the building of this bridge. With differing accounts of exactly what happened during Caligula’s reign as emperor, we may never know whether the floating bridge of Baiae was actually constructed, but it remains a lasting story of power, madness, and what happens when the two intertwine.

Please note this is for sale on a pre order basis only. Pre Order period ends March 31st, 2019. Do not miss out.

Roman Pontoon Bridge

Iceni Warrior

Enemies of Rome

Roman Fort

The original design of the Roman Fort was as a facade. John had many requests to turn this into an actual Roman Fort. After much arm twisting john agreed to produce Straight Walls to allow you to construct a full fort if you wished. We do not know the production quantity,
so would recommend ordering sooner rather than later as we think this will be a limited production run.

Roman Army of the Late Republic

Thracian Peltast

Thracians

Conquistadors

The Spanish were known to have had four falconets and ten brass lombards with them when they first landed in 1519. Spanish gunners had a poor reputation, and crews were mainly made up of seamen, and a mix of foreigners from Italy, Netherlands and Portugal.

Conquistadors

Aztec – Tlaxcalans

Talaxcaltecs

2nd Massachusetts Regiment

2nd Massachusetts Regiment

Hessian Jager Corps

Hessian Jager Corps

Continental Army – Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold was an American military officer who served as a general during the American Revolutionary War, fighting for the American Continental Army before defecting to the British in 1780. Arnold was born in the Connecticut Colony and was a merchant operating ships on the Atlantic Ocean when the war began in 1775. He joined the growing army outside Boston and distinguished himself through acts of intelligence and bravery. His actions included the Capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775, defensive and delaying tactics at the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776 which allowed American forces time to prepare New York’s defenses, the Battle of Ridgefield, Connecticut (after which he was promoted to major general), and operations in relief of the Siege of Fort Stanwix.

Arnold was to distinguish himself in both Battles of Saratoga, even though General Gates removed him from field command after the first battle, following a series of escalating disagreements and disputes that culminated in a shouting match.

During the fighting in the second battle, Arnold disobeyed Gates’ orders and took to the battlefield to lead attacks on the British defenses. It was the American forces, led by Major General Benedict Arnold, which managed to take the Breymann Redoubt, which gave them a strong position behind the British lines. The loss of the Redoubt rendered the British position untenable. The British Army was forced to pull back to the river, from which position they would attempt to retreat north the next morning.

Continental Army

The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that saw extensive service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The unit was the first African-American regiment organized in the northern states during the Civil War. Authorized by the Emancipation proclamation, the regiment consisted of African-American enlisted men commanded by white officers.

The The regiment’s first battlefield action took place in a skirmish with Confederate troops on James Island, South Carolina, on July 16. The regiment stopped a Confederate assault, losing 42 men in the process.

The regiment gained recognition on July 18, 1863, when it spearheaded an assault on Fort Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina. 270 of the 600 men who charged Fort Wagner were “killed, wounded or captured.” At this battle Colonel Shaw was killed, along with 29 of his men; 24 more later died of wounds, 15 were captured, 52 were missing in action and never accounted for, and 149 were wounded. The total regimental casualties of 270 would be the highest total for the 54th in a single engagement during the war.

Although Union forces were not able to take and hold the fort (despite taking a portion of the walls in the initial assault), the 54th was widely acclaimed for its valor during the battle, and the event helped encourage the further enlistment and mobilization of African-American troops, a key development that President Abraham Lincoln once noted as helping to secure the final victory. Decades later, Sergeant William Harvey Carney was awarded the Medal of Honor for grabbing the U.S. flag as the flag bearer fell, carrying the flag to the enemy ramparts and back, and singing “Boys, the old flag never touched the ground!” While other African Americans had since been granted the award by the time it was presented to Carney, Carney’s is the earliest action for which the Medal of Honor was awarded to an African American.

The service of the 54th Massachusetts, particularly their charge at Fort Wagner, soon became one of the most famous episodes of the war, interpreted through artwork, poetry and song. More recently, the 54th Massachusetts gained prominence through the award-winning film Glory.

American Civil War, 1861 – 1865

Knights Of The Skies

The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during World War I. The D.III was flown by many top German aces, including Wilhelm Frankl, Erich Löwenhardt, Manfred von Richthofen, Karl Emil Schäfer, Ernst Udet, and Kurt Wolff, and Austro-Hungarian ones, like Godwin von Brumowski.

It was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as “Bloody April” 1917.

Following the successful Albatros D.I and D.II series, the D.III utilized the same semi-monocoque, plywood-skinned fuselage. However, at the request of the Idflieg (Inspectorate of Flying Troops), the D.III adopted a sesquiplane wing arrangement broadly similar to the French Nieuport 11. The upper wingspan was extended, while the lower wing was redesigned with reduced chord and a single main spar. “V” shaped interplane struts replaced the previous parallel struts. For this reason, British aircrews commonly referred to the D.III as the “V-strutter.”

The D.III entered squadron service in December 1916, and was immediately acclaimed by German aircrews for its maneuverability and rate of climb. Two faults with the new aircraft were soon identified. Like the D.II, early D.IIIs featured a Teves und Braun airfoil-shaped radiator in the center of the upper wing, where it tended to scald the pilot if punctured. From the 290th D.III onward, the radiator was offset to the right on production machines while others were soon moved to the right as a field modification.

Aircraft deployed in Palestine used two wing radiators, to cope with the warmer climate.

Albatros built approximately 500 D.III aircraft at its Johannisthal factory.

In the spring of 1917, D.III production shifted to Albatros’ subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW), to permit Albatros to concentrate on development and production of the D.V.

Between April and August 1917, Idflieg issued five separate orders for a total of 840 D.IIIs. The OAW variant underwent its Typenprüfung in June 1917. Production commenced at the Schneidemühl factory in June and continued through December 1917. OAW aircraft were distinguishable by their larger, rounded rudders.

Werner Voss, during his period with Jasta Boelcke, flew this highly decorated Albatros DIII. Whilst the cowling remained grey, the nose on Voss’s plane was painted red, which was common for almost all the planes in Jasta 2. The plywood fuselage had a red heart , edged white, similar to a Valentine’s Day chocolate box on each side, and later a third heart was painted on the top of the fuselage. Also on each side of the plane , a white swastika surrounded by an olive wreath was painted. This was considered a sign of good luck or fortune, and was a common symbol which could be found on many planes from almost every nation during WW1.

Werner Voss (13 April 1897 – 23 September 1917) was a World War I German flying ace credited with 48 aerial victories.

By 6 April 1917, Voss had scored 24 victories and awarded Germany’s highest award, the Pour le Mérite. The medal’s mandatory month’s leave removed Voss from the battlefield during Bloody April; in his absence, Richthofen scored 13 victories. Nevertheless, Richthofen regarded Voss as his only possible rival as top scoring ace of the war.

His last flight came on 23 September 1917, just hours after his 48th victory. After he fell in solo opposition to eight British aces, he was described by his preeminent foe, James McCudden, as “the bravest German airman.

Von Richthofen and most other German aces won the majority of their victories on the D.III, and it even turned out to be more successful than its alleged successor, and continued in production for several months after the introduction of the D.V.

Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft on the Western Front. 1,866 Albatros D.III planes were produced.

The D.III did not disappear with the end of production, however. It remained in frontline service well into 1918.

As late as March 1918, there were still nearly 200 D.IIIs in service on the Western Front, eight months even after the introduction of its successor.

Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Inter-War Aviation

A U.S. Navy Aircraft carrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

During flight operations, fire fighters and crash crews usually had at least two men standing by wearing asbestos suits as a fire rescue team.

These were nicknamed “Hot Papas”, and it was their job to literally pull men out of burning planes.

Inter-War Aviation Collection

Second World War Aircraft

A U.S. Navy Aircraft carrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

During flight operations, fire fighters and crash crews usually had at least two men standing by wearing asbestos suits as a fire rescue team.

These were nicknamed “Hot Papas”, and it was their job to literally pull men out of burning planes.

JJD Second World War Aircraft Collection

New King & Country March Releases!

Saturday, March 2nd, 2019

A WINTER WARRIOR

Most armies, given the choice, prefer NOT to fight their wars and battles in wintertime… It’s cold, miserable, damp and the daylight hours can be very short.

All that being said the decision where, and importantly, when armies ‘take to the field’ is usually left for their commanders to decide.

Two of the most uncomfortable locations to fight a winter battle or a campaign in was the Eastern Front between 1942 and 1945 and the Ardennes Forest in December 1944.

As many collectors know the Sturmgeschutz Ⅲ more commonly referred to as the StuGⅢ was Germany’s second most-produced armoured fighting vehicle during World War 2.

Built on the chassis of the already-proven PanzerⅢ, it replaced the Panzer turret with an armoured, fixed superstructure mounting a more powerful 7.5cm main gun. This was originally intended as a mobile assault gun for direct-fire infantry support. Later, the StuGⅢ adopted in addition another role, similar to that of the Jagdpanzer… tank destroyer!

As secondary armament the StuGⅢ mounted the tried and tested MG34 machine gun complete with protective shield.

Approximately 10,000 StuGⅢ’s of various types were built between 1942 and 1945 with the vast majority being supplied to the Wehrmacht. Small numbers were however sold to Finland, Romania, Bulgaria, Spain and Hungary. A few even turned up in Syria and took part in the 1967 Arab / Israeli War.

This “winterized” StuGⅢ has been given by its crew a ‘winter whitewash’ coat of camouflage and could be placed somewhere in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944… or perhaps on the Russian Front in the latter half of WW2.

SPECIAL NOTE: Just 200 of this version are available and each one comes with a well-wrapped up vehicle commander scanning the horizon for any enemy activity.

Battle of the Bulge

ROMANS & BARBARIANS

  • RnB020 Centurion & His Prisoner – This Centurion, sword in hand, is taking no chances with this captured Celtic warrior. Although trussed up in a heavy wooden stock some prisoners are capable of anything even when ‘locked-up’ in this manner.
  • RnB022 Kneel & Obey – A kneeling Gallic prisoner is told to pay attention and watch the fate of other Roman captives as they are being punished.
  • RnB034 Galloping Gaul – Spear held aloft and ready to be thrown at the hated Roman invaders this mounted Gaul is not impressed by the might of Rome.
  • RnB037 Charging Gaul – Totally unafraid this Gaul charges towards the enemy.
  • RnB039 Shouting Celt – Sword in one hand, shield in the other, this red-haired Celt screams defiance at the enemy.

Romans

RETURN TO THE ALAMO

SIX additional reinforcements for the beleaguered garrison still holding off Santa Anna’s army at the little mission in San Antonio, Texas.

  • RTA107 Tennessee Woodsman – One of Davy Crockett’s backwoods volunteers who journeyed with him to Texas to join the fight for Texan independence.
  • RTA108 James Murray Brown – This Pennsylvania native was born in 1800 and moved to Texas in 1835. He took part in the siege of Bexar and became part of the Alamo garrison where he perished on the morning of March 6, 1836.
  • RTA110 The Flagbearer – Micajah Autry, originally from North Carolina was born in 1793 and fought previously in the War of 1812. A well-read and educated man he had been a farmer, teacher and a lawyer before enlisting in the ‘Volunteer Auxiliary Corps of Texas’ in early 1836 just in time to take part in the Alamo struggle. Here he carries one of several flags that are said to have flown over the Alamo itself… This one was the Mexican tricolor complete with ‘1824’ sewn in black in the middle of the tricolour’s white strip. Like all the other defenders he died on the morning of March 6.
  • RTA116 Thomas R. Miller – Tom Millar was a member of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers. Under the command of Lieut. George C. Kimble and Capt. Albert Martin, Millar and 30 other men successfully passed through Santa Anna’s besieging army and galloped into the Alamo on February 23, 1836 never to leave.
  • RTA117 George Neggan of South Carolina – Another horseman of the Gonzales Ranging Company armed only with a pistol.
  • RTA120 James C. Gwynne – Originally born in England he moved to Texas from Mississippi where he had been a farmer. At the Alamo he was a member of Capt. William Carey’s artillery company. Here, however, he’s taken up his musket to fire at the attacking Mexican infantry.

Remember the Alamo

THE KING’S GERMANS

For 13 years between 1803 and 1816, there was one major British Army unit that primarily consisted of German expatriates… The King’s German Legion.

Under overall British command the Legion earned the unique distinction of being the only German military force to fight without interruption against the French during the Napoleonic Wars!

After the occupation of Hanover by Napoleon’s troops in 1803 many former Hanoverian officers and soldiers fled to Britain where GeorgeⅢ King of Great Britain was also Elector of Hanover.

The King sanctioned a volunteer corps of all arms infantry, artillery and cavalry to be raised and named them, ‘The King’s German Legion’.

Soon, it grew to a strength of 14,000 officers and men and played a vital role in Britain’s defeat of the French emperor.

Among the Legion’s most famous regiments were two Regiments of Light Dragoons. Here, for the first time, are King & Country’s mounted tribute to these fine German horsemen.

  • NA427 KGL Dragoon w/Sabre Down  – Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • NA429 KGL Dragoon Advancing at the Gallup – Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • NA430 KGL Dragoon Charge – You can almost hear the shout as this particular Dragoon charges forward to engage the opposition sabre held menacingly over his head.
  • NA431 KGL Dragoon Moving Forward – This Dragoon rests his sabre on his shoulder as he prepares to change from the gallup to the full charge.

The King’s German Legion

Vietnam

Here are some great-looking USMC reinforcements fighting their way into the old Imperial capital.

  • VN040 The Scout – Cautiously edging forward this ‘Grunt’ takes a look at what is just around the corner…
  • VN043 Hunkered-Down – Another Marine is also interested in seeing what’s just around the next corner.
  • VN044 Wait – One hand stretched back to tell his buddies to halt this Marine is watching and waiting.
  • VN045 Kneeling LAW Gunner – In the close-quarter fighting that took place all over HUE the M72 LAW (Light Anti Tank Weapon) proved invaluable at taking out enemy bunkers, buildings and machine gun ‘nests’… One shot… One kill!
  • VN050 Vietnam War Dog – War dogs could be trained to sniff-out explosives or uncover hidden exits and entrances to underground bunkers and tunnels. This Marine handler and his German Shepherd seem to be on the trail of something… or someone.

Vietnam – Tet’68

Streets of Old Hong Kong

  • HK283 Grain & Grocery Store – This three-level façade is typical of the kind of general food store that used to be found all over Hong Kong and other Chinese cities. On display are various kinds of ‘smoked and cured meats’ as well as large display buckets of different types of rice… the main staple of many Asian diets.
  • HK286M Chinese Grocer – The perfect ‘companion piece’ for HK283, or indeed any of our traditional Chinese Shop / House facades. Our grocer is dressed in the style of a late 19th Century, businessman… prosperous to show that he is successful but not ‘too prosperous’ to reveal that he might be charging too much for his goods and services!!!
  • HK286G Chinese Grocer

Orient

John Jenkins Roman Pontoon Bridge

Saturday, March 2nd, 2019

ROMAN, PONTOON BRIDGE

Roman-designed pontoon bridges, constructed mostly during wartime for the shock and awe of quick raids, and were a specialty of Julius Caesar’s.

In 55 B.C., he built a pontoon bridge that was around 437 yards (400 meters) long to cross the Rhine river, which was traditionally thought by the Germanic tribes to be safely out of reach of Roman power.

Roman leader Caligula is well-known for his brief stint as the emperor of Rome, from 37 AD through 41 AD. Some say that Caligula displayed signs of madness during his reign. According to historical accounts, one of these displays of madness was Caligula’s demand for the construction of a floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae so that he could ride triumphantly across it. Some historians dispute the building of this bridge. With differing accounts of exactly what happened during Caligula’s reign as emperor, we may never know whether the floating bridge of Baiae was actually constructed, but it remains a lasting story of power, madness, and what happens when the two intertwine.

Please note this is for sale on a pre order basis only. Pre Order period ends March 31st, 2019. Do not miss out.

Roman Pontoon Bridge