Archive for February, 2019

New Jenkins March Releases!

Saturday, February 23rd, 2019

THE ROMAN ARMY OF THE LATE REPUBLIC

Republican Romans

GERMANIC WARRIORS

Following two decades of Roman occupation, Germania Magna erupted into revolt in AD 9, resulting in the stunning loss of three Roman legions to an alliance of Germanic nations at Teutoburg. The Battle of the Teutoburg Fores, described as the Varian Disaster by Roman historians, took place in the Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions and their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus.

The alliance was led by Arminius, a Germanic officer of Varus’ auxilia. Arminius had acquired Roman citizenship and had received a Roman military education, which enabled him to deceive the Roman commander methodically and anticipate the Roman army’s tactical responses.

Despite several successful campaigns and raids by the Romans in the years after the battle, they never again attempted to conquer the Germanic territories east of the Rhine river. The victory of the Germanic tribes against Rome’s legions in the Teutoburg Forest would have far-reaching effects on the subsequent history of both the ancient Germanic peoples and the Roman Empire. Contemporary and modern

historians have generally regarded Arminius’ victory over Varus as “Rome’s greatest defeat”, one of the most decisive battles recorded in military history, and as “a turning-point in world history”

The Cherusci nation, was a Germanic tribe that fought at the Teutoburg Pass, Weser River, Idistaviso and the Agrivarian Wall under its war chief Arminius. These warriors were perfectly equipped for the Germanic landscape of open fields, forests and swamps. The weapons which were used included the long lance or Framea, which could be swung, thrust or thrown at an opponent.

Hair was grown long and often tied up in a figure of eight or “Suebian” knot.

In the Cherusci warrior the Roman Legionary met a formidable opponent. The Germanic warrior was a well trained, battle-hardened, combat ready and motivated fighter, who excelled in irregular warfare, ambushes, raids and petty warfare. In an ambush the lightly armed Germanic fighter could decisively defeat a heavily equipped legionary by using surprise and the terrain to his advantage.

In a set-piece battle the German could stand up to the Roman Leginary discipline and formations for a while, but in close quarters combat the advantage eventually shifted to the legionary, as at the Battle of Idistaviso, and the Angrivarian Wall.

Enemies of Rome

THRACIANS

Thracians

THE AZTEC EMPIRE

This Aztec chieftain wears a sleeveless corselet called an “ehuatl”, which was a garment of feather-covered cloth worn over cotton armour. Senior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of blue feathers. Junior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of red feathers.

Additional armour was provided by greaves, armbands and wristlets, and a helmet made from wood, and bone which was ornately decorated with feathers.

The greaves and armbands were generally made of gilded leather, bark or thin gold.

This figure does not carry a standard on the back, instead has a “skin drum”. These drums were used to transmit certain orders on the battlefield.

Aztec Empire

THE TLAXCALTECS

The Tlaxcalans, or Talaxcaltecs, are an indigenous group of Nahua ethnicity who inhabited the republic of Tlaxcala and present-day Mexican state of Tlaxcala.

Despite early attempts by the Mexica, the Tlaxcalteca were never conquered by the Aztec Triple Alliance. The Aztecs allowed them to maintain their independence so that they could participate in the xochiyaoyatl (flower wars) with them to facilitate human sacrifice

The Tlaxcaltecs served as allies to Hernán Cortés and his fellow Spanish conquistadors, and were instrumental in the invasion of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire, helping the Spanish reach the Valley of Anahuac and providing a key contingent of the invasion force

A flower war or flowery war (Nahuatl languages: xōchiyāōyōtl, Spanish: guerra florida) was a ritual war fought intermittently between the Aztec Triple Alliance and its enemies from the “mid-1450s to the arrival of the Spaniards in 1519.

The Aztecs practiced human sacrifice. Most of the people sacrificed were not residents of the Aztec’s major cities, rather they were captured in wars, both wars of conquest and “wars of the flowers”. The Aztec term for wars for captives was Xochiyayoyotl.

The Xochiyayoyotl came about after a long famine, from 1450 to 1454. Crops failed all over the Valley of Mexico due to bad weather. To the Aztecs, it showed the gods were displeased; they needed more blood and human hearts. Montezuma I reigned during the great famine. His brother Tlacaelel was Montezuma’s Snake Woman or first adviser, a general in the Aztec army and of the highest warrior order, the Shorn Ones.

When bad weather continued the famine, Tlacaelel suggested a ritual or ceremonial war to provide captives for sacrifice for the Aztecs and their enemies. The nearby Tlaxcala were the Triple Alliance’s main enemy. They had also experienced the famine. Through human sacrifice, the gods would be assuaged for both sides.

Though there were undoubtedly more reasons for Flower wars, such as further terrorizing the surrounding areas, they began during the great famine. Tenochtitlan reached an agreement with its enemies the Tlaxcala, Cholula and Huejotzingo, to war for captives. Their warriors would be told not to kill enemy warriors, but to capture them. Once each side had enough captives, the battle would end. The captured warriors would then be taken for sacrifice by both sides in the battle.

Thus, from time to time, Aztecs would arrange a Flower war when the need for human captives arose. In essence, these were ceremonial in nature, with all the details arranged beforehand by the leaders involved. Nevertheless, they were still a matter of life and death for the warriors; to be captured meant being sacrificed. While a sacrifice was considered an honorable death, no doubt most warriors would prefer to avoid it.

Whether a Flower war was arranged simply to satisfy religious demands for sacrificial victims, to train young warriors and to ensure social advancement for warriors or if it had underlying purposes of wearing down the enemy and terrorizing neighboring lands is still debated by scholars.

Some scholars maintain that the Flower wars were more like tournaments, with no more political purpose than to satisfy warriors in vying for advancement and provide ritual bloodletting and sacrifices. Other scholars see darker political aspects to these ritual wars: to demonstrate Aztec might, to wear down the enemy through attrition and to allow Aztec leaders to subjugate their own people through fear of losing loved ones.

The Aztecs had never managed to conquer the Tlaxcala. While the Tlaxcala were also Aztecs, they refused to pay tribute to the Triple Alliance. Montezuma might have thought that through the Flower wars, the Triple Alliance would be able to wear down the Tlaxcala and capture more of their warriors than they could afford to lose. If so, the Tlaxcala delivered the final blow: they allied with the Spanish in conquering and defeating the Aztec Empire.

Many sources depict high status warriors wearing the distinctive back ornaments of their communities. The great white heron represented the house of Tizatlan. The “Tlahuiztli” is covered in large yellow feathers, and the warrior wears the red and white headband which was an attribute of Tlaxcallan nationality.

Talaxcaltecs

SPANISH CONQUISTADORS

The Spanish were known to have had four falconets and ten brass lombards with them when they first landed in 1519. Spanish gunners had a poor reputation, and crews were mainly made up of seamen, and a mix of foreigners from Italy, Netherlands and Portugal.

Conquistadors

American Revolution – NEILSON’S FARMHOUSE.

A young and ambitious John Neilson came to this area in 1772 from just outside Elizabeth, NJ. He went to work in the village of Stillwater, two miles south of the house, on the farm of Abner Quitterfield. Only three years later, in 1775, he leased 150 acres of land, and ‘married the boss’s daughter,’ Lydia. Within a year or two, they built this small house on the lot he had leased.

In 1777, a British army was invading southward from Canada into New York. Their route would take them through the Neilsons’ back yard. John took Lydia and their possessions to the safety of her parents’ home in Stillwater. He then exchanged his home for a tent, serving with his local militia regiment—some of whom would be encamped nearby.

American army officers moved into his empty house on September 12, 1777. About ten miles north, British forces steadily descended the Hudson River Valley as American troops hastily built menacing defenses 3/4 of a mile east on Bemus Heights—a ridge of bluffs overlooking the Hudson. The American army used this house as a divisional and brigade headquarters. Ephraim Woodworth’s house, 1/2 mile south of Neilson’s, was headquarters for the American army commanding general, Horatio Gates.

The only account from the time of the battles says General Enoch Poor of New Hampshire and General Benedict Arnold of Connecticut were quartered here.

Fighting came within about one mile of this house. As Gates’ army moved on, though, they left behind a farm in near-ruins. John and Lydia returned shortly after the army’s departure and began restoring the farm. Their crops had been ravaged, and their fields torn up. John filed a damage claim in May 1778, in the amount of £100 (about three times a soldier’s annual salary), but he was not reimbursed.

The Neilsons continued with their family life, eventually having eight children. As the family grew, a small house would no longer do; the first U.S. Census from 1790 lists eleven people living here. By 1830, they had built a larger, two-story home.

By the 1890s, they had pushed back the original part of the house and added a carriage barn.

This house is based on the reproduction of Neilson,s Farmhouse, now standing in the grounds of the SARATOGA BATTLEFIELD NATIONAL PARK.

The model can be suitable for the French Indian War, American Revolution, and of course the American Civil War.

The model has a lift off roof, with basic interior detail, and a front door which can be opened or closed..

Drums along the Mohawk

MORGAN’S RIFLEMEN

Morgans Riflemen

THE 1st CANADIAN REGIMENT

1st Canadian Regiment

New Hobby Master Announcements Expected August 2019!

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

Modern Air Power

New Releases Expected August 2019!

Modern Air Power Collection

Air Power – 1:48 Scale

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

New Britain’s Releases Expected Late February!

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

Museum Collection

Expected late February / March 2019!

Museum Collection

Brunswickers

Brunswickers

American Civil war

American Civil War

WWI – Battle of Somme

Battle of the Somme

New King & Country February Releases!

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

VIETNAM FIRE SUPPORT!

When American troops first deployed in force to South Vietnam in 1965 they were supported by a number of brand-new airfield and ground installations that required a low altitude defense system.

The anti aircraft system then in operation with U.S. Forces worldwide was provided by HAWK missile batteries… These however proved inadequate in Vietnam and an alternative had to be found and so the U.S. Army began recalling the older M42 ‘Duster’ anti aircraft guns back into service and organizing them into Air Defense Artillery battalions (ADA).

Beginning in the Fall of 1966 three battalions of ‘Dusters’ were operational in Vietnam each consisting of a headquarters battery and four ‘Duster’ batteries, each augmented by one Quad .50 battery and an artillery searchlight battery.

Despite a few early ‘air kills’, a major air threat from North Vietnam never materialized and ADA crews found themselves increasingly involved in ground support missions. Most often those involved point security… convoy escort and / or perimeter defense.

Probably the ‘Duster’s’ finest hour came at the time of the TET Offensive in 1968 when M42’s and their twin 40mm guns made short work of massed VC and NVA infantry attacks and helped knock out enemy bunker and defence positions.

U.S. Army and Marine units came to place a high value on the mobile close artillery support the M42 ‘Duster’ provided time and time again.

Perhaps the Grunts’ own graffiti scrawled on one M42 said it all… “Have Guns Will Travel!”

  • VN033 The M42 DUSTER – During the Korean War (1950-53) the U.S. Army decided it needed a mobile anti aircraft gun that could utilize the existing chassis of the M41 Tank. Since 40mm guns were seen as the most effective twin gun mounting, similar to those on most U.S. Navy ships of that era, they were ‘married’ to a M41 chassis and designated the M42. The first M42’s entered service in late 1953 with production halted in 1960 after some 3,700 vehicles had been produced.These in turn began to be replaced by the HAWK Surface to Air Missile units in the early 1960’s. By 1963 most ‘Dusters’ had been transferred to National Guard units… Until Vietnam! Our King & Country model, made up of over 95 separate parts, is typical of the U.S. Army “Dusters” of the late 1960’s period during the Vietnam War. Two seated Gunners man the twin 40mm ‘Bofors ’ guns and the vehicle also comes with double radio antennas and a side-mounted M60 machine gun. Painted in standard U.S. Army Olive Drab this particular M42 is nicknamed ‘Double Trouble’ and stands ready for action… anytime, anywhere.
  • VN042 Duster Add-On Crew – Two essential add-ons to complete your M42 in action… A kneeling NCO rifleman observes the battle as his buddy prepares to load a ‘clip’ of 40mm shells into one of the guns.
  • VN046 Crouching Marine Firing M72 LAW – The M72 LAW (Light Anti Tank Weapon) was a portable, one-shot, 66mm unguided anti tank weapon first adopted by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps in 1963. Although originally intended for anti armoured vehicle use U.S. ground forces frequently used it against enemy bunker and fixed defence positions especially in urban areas.Our Marine crouches as he aims the weapon at his target… One shot, one hit!
  • VN049 Dead or Alive – M16 pointing directly at the enemy this Marine is taking no chances as he approaches a North Vietnamese Army (NVA) casualty.

Vietnam – Tet 68

SAME MARINES… DIFFERENT WAR

  • USMC051 Softly, Softly – Like his Vietnam counterpart VN049, this WW2 “Leatherneck” cautiously edges forward towards some Japanese dead or perhaps he is moving carefully through a possible minefield… you make the decision.
  • USMC052 Pacific War Dog – During WW2 the Marine Corps trained a small number of ‘War Dogs’ for service in the Pacific. They were first used on Bougainville and Peleliu but saw most active duty on Guam where 60 war dogs and their handlers went ashore and twenty were killed or believed ‘missing-in-action.’ Some other war dogs served as ‘messenger dogs’ while more were used as ‘sentries’ or on the ‘point’ of patrols where their superior animal senses often negated any surprise attack or ambush by the Japanese.Not surprisingly Marine ‘war dogs’ were expert at ‘flushing-out’ hidden enemies and, alas, suffered heavy losses especially on Iwo Jima.‘War Dogs’ were mostly recruited from civilian owners and screened to eliminate high-strung or vicious animals. Mongrels often proved the best adapted to their military duties followed by German Shepherds… Dobermans however turned out to be ‘too nervous’.Our kneeling Marine handler, complete with Winchester Shotgun and holstered M1911 Colt Automatic gets ready for the next operation together with his brown & black cross breed called ‘Sailor’.

Battle of TARAWA

ROME AT WAR

  • ROM031 Pilum Thrower – As this Roman soldier runs forward he protects his body with his shield as he launches his Pilum at the enemy…

Romans – King and Country

THE REAL WEST

Not so long ago several of our ‘Real West’ collectors suggested to us that we should produce different colour variations of a few of ‘Custer’s Last Stand’ figures. And so, after carefully considering their suggestions we selected a few figures on either side that might be perfect candidates for an ‘alternative’ version…

  • TRW148 Single-handed First Aid – Gripping the cloth in his teeth this wounded trooper attempts to bandage his bleeding wrist while still holding his ‘Army’ Colt in one hand.
  • TRW149 Dismounted & Trapped! – With his horse shot from under him and collapsed on top of his left leg this trooper is already doomed. Defiantly, he raises himself to aim his pistol at attacking Indians.
  • TRW151 Dazed & Bleeding – Another forlorn trooper has been struck in the head by an Indian warrior’s club or tomahawk… Partially blinded by his wound he attempts to crawl to safety…
  • TRW154 Medicine Crow – Although most of the hostile Indians Custer faced at the Little Big Horn were Sioux and Cheyenne a number of other tribes were also present… Among them a young warrior chief called ‘Medicine Crow’ seen here letting loose an arrow at the beleaguered ‘Long Knives’.
  • TRW158 Dog Wolf – A kneeling dismounted Cheyenne warrior, ‘Dog Wolf’ takes careful aim with his captured U.S. Cavalry carbine.

Battle of Little Big Horn June 25/26, 1876.

TOMMY ATKINS ESQ. IN ACTION

‘Tommy Atkins’ (often just Tommy) has been slang for a common soldier in the British Army for over two centuries. The origins of the name go as far back as the Napoleonic Wars. One common belief is that the name was chosen by the Duke of Wellington himself after having been inspired by the bravery of one of his private soldiers during the Peninsula War. After one particular battle the Duke came upon a certain severely wounded soldier and asked after his condition. The terribly injured soldier simply replied, “I’m all right sir… All in a day’s work” and died shortly afterwards.

Sometime later the Duke was asked what generic British name should be used on all army forms… He remembered the brave but gravely wounded soldier from his Peninsula days and also his name… ‘Tommy Atkins’.

Here are some welcome British Army infantry of the Napoleonic era that would be proud to bear the name Tommy Atkins.

  • NA417 Colonel of the Regiment – This mounted senior officer bellows out his orders in the heat of battle.
  • NA418 Infantry Captain – As bullet, shot and shell erupt about him this officer remains cool, calm and collected… sword in hand. The epitome of the British ‘stiff upper lip’.
  • NA419 Infantryman with Pike Staff – This private soldier has momentarily put aside his ‘Brown Bess’ Musket to pick up a long pike staff from a dead sergeant… All the better to reach out and stab any attacking French cavalryman.
  • NA420 Drummer Boy – Every Line Company in British infantry regiments had its own ‘Drummer Boy’, some as young as 11 or 12 but usually about 15 years of age. Many of these young lads were orphans of the regiment and had grown up within it when their parents were still alive.
  • NA421 Reaching For A Cartridge – This standing infantryman stands ready to repel the enemy as he reaches back into his ammunition pouch for a fresh cartridge.
  • NA422 Kneeling Cocking His Musket – Weapon fully loaded this kneeling ‘Red Coat’ pulls back the hammer of his musket.
  • NA423 Kneeling Ready – Weapon loaded, bayonet fixed and awaiting further orders.
  • NA424 Lying Prone Firing – Lying on the ground in front of the ranks of his kneeling and standing comrades this ‘Tommy Atkins’ takes careful aim.
  • NA425 Hors de Combat – Out of action due to injury or damage this crawling soldier tries to seek cover in the midst of the action.
  • NA-S07 Blood, Bullets & Cold Steel – A combined ‘Extra Value Added Set’ that brings all of these great figures together and offers them to dealers and collectors at a GREAT PRICE!

British Napoleonic Infantry & Artillery