Archive for September 9th, 2017

New John Jenkins September Releases!

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

THE ANCIENTS COLLECTION – ARMIES AND ENEMIES OF ANCIENT ROME




Enemies of Rome

ROMAN AUXILLIARY CAVALRY


Roman Auxiliary Cavalry were drawn from a wide range of warlike peoples throughout the provinces, especially on the fringes of the empire. They were generally not citizens of the Roman empire.

These auxilia cavalry provided a powerful fighting arm, they were well organized, disciplined, and well trained.

The four horned saddle, which was originally of Celtic origin, was an important part of cavalry equipment.

The four tall horns closed around and gripped the riders thighs, but did not inhibit free movement , which was especially important to spear armed horsemen. In an age which did not have the stirrup, the adoption of the four horned saddle allowed the horsemen to launch a missile effectively, or use both hands confidently to wield a shield and sword, during a melee.



Roman Auxiliary Cavalry

THE WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

THE BATTLE OF BUSHY RUN 1763




Battle of Bushy Run

RAID ON ST. FRANCIS 1959




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

FIRST SUDAN WAR 1884-1885


The Naval Brigade was a generic term used to define a body of Seamen, and Royal Marines, drawn from their ships and landed for active service under the orders of an army commander. Numbers were immaterial and it did not relate to an army Brigade. Often it would not even be of battalion strength.

Generally the armament of the Naval Brigade was made up of what was available from the parent ships, from where the Brigade was drawn.

The Gatling gun or its variants was the main weapon of the Naval Brigade in Egypt and the Sudan.



First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

AIRCRAFT CARRIER BASES


The Aircraft carriers during the second World War mainly had wooden decks.

The colour depended on the class of ship and when it was commissioned

It also depended on whether the ship received upgrades or had battle damage repairs.

To better camouflage the carriers from the air, the decks were treated with a dark blue stain, called “Deck Stain #21”.

It was approximately the same colour as the “Sea Blue” that the tops of the aircraft were painted during the tri colour scheme, but not as dark as the overall “midnight Blue” which aircraft were painted towards the end of the war.

Please note “BH CARRIER BASES” can be used as single, double or as a triple display.

The Double Base 19 ½” x 15” x ¾” (using any 2 of the 3 BH bases) can accommodate most 1/30 scale carrier fighters.

The Triple Base 29 ¼” x 15” x ¾” (using any 3 of the BH bases) can accommodate one 1/30 scale carrier fighter and 1 “parked” carrier fighter.

Please note BH Carrier Bases are designed to be displayed in sets of 3, “running Vertically”, as opposed to the IWA Carrier Bases which are designed to be displayed “running horizontally in sets of 2.


JJ WWII
Collection