Archive for the ‘John Jenkins’ Category

New John Jenkins October Releases!

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE


No. 457 Squadron was a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fighter squadron of World War II. Equipped with Supermarine Spitfire fighters, it was formed in England during June 1941 under Article XV of the Empire Air Training Scheme. The squadron was transferred to Australia in June 1942 and saw combat in the South West Pacific Area before being disbanded in November 1945.

These new WW2 planes have been designed with interchangeable “plug-in” undercarriages.

This will enable those collectors who wish to display their Second World War models on display stands, to display them with the undercarriage correctly closed.

The models will also have opening and closing canopies.

The side door will open only on specific models, marked with the code “D”. Since the hinge is oversize, if the model is displayed with the door closed this may not be acceptable.


The squadron saw combat against both Nazi Germany and the Empire of Japan during the war. From March to May 1942 it was based in southern England and flew missions over German-occupied France during which it shot down at least five Luftwaffe aircraft. After being deployed to Australia, No. 457 Squadron was based near Darwin as part of No. 1 Wing RAAF and intercepted several Japanese raids on Allied bases in northern Australia between March and November 1943. The squadron remained at Darwin and saw almost no combat during 1944, but moved to Morotai and later Labuan in 1945 from where it attacked Japanese positions in the Netherlands East Indies and Borneo as part of Allied offensives in these areas.

No. 457 Squadron flew its first operations from Morotai on 10 February. The squadron’s main roles in this period were to conduct ground attack missions against Japanese camps and shipping as well as escorting other aircraft engaged in attacking these targets. This involved a heavy workload, and the squadron flew over 293 operational sorties between February and the end of April. From May No. 457 Squadron’s Spitfires began using dive bombing tactics as well as strafing targets with their guns.
No. 457 Squadron participated in the Borneo Campaign during the final months of the war. On 27 May it was ordered to prepare for deployment, and on 5 June its personnel and equipment sailed for Labuan island off the north-west coast of Borneo

Please note that one more Spitfire MK VIII for the RAAF at Moratai, will be available later next year, as well as more ground crew and pilots.


Robert Henry Maxwell (Bobby) Gibbes, DSO, DFC & Bar, OAM (6 May 1916 – 11 April 2007) was a leading Australian fighter ace of World War II, and the longest-serving wartime commanding officer of No. 3 Squadron RAAF. He was officially credited with 10¼ aerial victories, although his score is often reported as 12, including two shared. Gibbes was also credited with five aircraft probably destroyed, and a further 16 damaged. He commanded No. 3 Squadron in North Africa from February 1942 to April 1943, apart from a brief period when he was injured.

Born in rural New South Wales, Gibbes worked as a jackaroo and salesman before joining the Royal Australian Air Force in February 1940. Posted to the Middle East in April 1941, he flew with No. 3 Squadron in the Syria–Lebanon Campaign, and became commanding officer during the Western Desert Campaign, where his leadership and fighting skills earned him the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Flying Cross and Bar. Subsequently posted to the South West Pacific, he served with No. 80 Wing of the Australian First Tactical Air Force, and took part in the “Morotai Mutiny” of April 1945. After the war he spent many years in New Guinea developing local industry, for which he was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 2004. He continued to fly until the age of 85, and died five years later in 2007.


JJ WWII Collection

WWI – BRITISH


The importance of motorbikes during the Great War is all too often overlooked. Motorbikes were used for mounted infantry, scouts, dispatch and courier duties, ammunition carriers, medical supply carriers and casualty evacuation. The versatility of these machines clearly helped them play a hugely significant role in the logistics of the war, far more than the automobile.

The use that they were most commonly used for was that of the messenger. Because of the unreliability of communications technology during the war years, the motorbike’s virtue of speed meant that orders, reports and maps could be transferred between units quickly.

It was not only the men who got to ride around on motorbikes. The Women’s Royal Flying Corps made extensive use of motorbikes. The initial aim of the WRAF was to provide female mechanics so that men could be free to serve in the armed forces. Thanks to the high number of women volunteers, many also filled driver positions as well.

Douglas was a British motorcycle manufacturer from 1907–1957 based in Kingswood, Bristol, owned by the Douglas family, and especially known for its horizontally opposed twin cylinder engined bikes and as manufacturers of speedway machines. The company also built a range of cars between 1913 and 1922.

During WW1 some 70,000 of these 349cc twin horizontal cylinder machines were produced for the British military.



British Forces

FRENCH MILITIA



French Militia 1759

THE SOUTH CAROLINA PROVINCIAL REGIMENT



Provincial Regiments 1759

WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

John Jenkins Sneak Peak from the Chicago Show 2017!

Saturday, September 30th, 2017

VOUGHT F4U CORSAIR


On display in the Treefrog Treasures room, under the guidance of Tom Dubel, was the prototype of the iconic second world war carrier fighter, the Vought F4U Corsair.

The Vought F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War 2 and the Korean War.

The Corsair was designed as a carrier based aircraft. Initially its difficulty in landing on carriers, rendered it unsuitable for Navy use until the Royal Navy overcame the landing issues.

After the carrier landing issues had been tackled, it quickly became the most capable carrier based fighter bomber of the Second World War.

The jjDesigns Corsair, can be displayed with wings down, and sitting on two of the jjD BH aircraft carrier decks.

The Undercarriage for the Corsair is interchangeable, and the model can be displayed on any of the jjD Flight Stands.

The wings can also be plugged into the raised position.

This with a single jjD Aircraft carrier base, allows for those with limited space to display their Corsair on a standard shelf unit.

The first Corsair will be available in 2018.

There will be another iconic US carrier plane released early next year, before the Corsair.

LITTLE JULIE II


Captive-taking by Native Americans was surprisingly common in Colonial times. It was also common for captives to choose their Native communities over their Colonial families.

This puzzled the European Americans.They came to America believing that conversion would be easy once Natives saw the superiority of the Europeans’ religion, clothing, agriculture, dwellings, and every comfort known so far to man.

Yet there were very few Indians who converted to English culture, while large numbers of English chose to become Indian. Even Benjamin Franklin pondered, “When an Indian child has been brought up among us, taught our language and habituated to our customs, yet if he goes to see his relations and makes one Indian ramble with them, there is no persuading him ever to return. [But] when white persons of either sex have been taken prisoners young by the Indians, and lived a while among them, tho’ ransomed by their friends, and treated with all imaginable tenderness to prevail with them to stay among the English, yet in a short time they become disgusted with our manner of life, and the care and pains that are necessary to support it, and take the first good opportunity of escaping again into the woods, from whence there is no reclaiming them.”

Amongst the many who were captured was Mary Jemison.

Mary Jemison was born on the ship that brought her Irish parents, brothers and sisters to America in 1743. A few years later her family moved from Philadelphia to a homestead on the Pennsylvania frontier. The family toiled on the edge of civilization transforming the wilderness to cultivated soil. Each new day brought with it the fear of attack by wild beast or hostile indian.

Those fears became a reality on the morning of a spring day in 1758. The British colonies were engulfed in a war against the French. On that spring morning in 1758 a small raiding party made up of French and Indians swooped down on the frontier settlement capturing a number of British colonists including Mary Jemison and most of her family. From that day until her death 78 years later, she was never to leave the Indian culture. Her story of her capture and life amongst the Seneca was first published in 1824.

THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA


A new series from jjDesigns, was previewed at the Sierra Toy Soldier room, at the Chicago Toy Soldier Show 2017.

The Aztec Empire flourished between c. 1345 and 1521 and, at its greatest extent, covered most of northern Mesoamerica. Aztec warriors were able to dominate their neighbouring states and permit rulers such as Motecuhzoma II to impose Aztec ideals and religion across Mexico. Highly accomplished in agriculture and trade, the last of the great Mesoamerican civilizations was also noted for its art and architecture which ranks amongst the finest ever produced on the continent.

The empire continued to expand from 1430 and the Aztec military – bolstered by conscription of all adult males, men supplied from allied and conquered states, and such elite groups as the Eagle and Jaguar warriors – swept aside their rivals. Aztec warriors wore padded cotton armour, carried a wooden or reed shield covered in hide, and wielded weapons such as a super sharp obsidian sword-club (macuahuitl), a spear or dart thrower (atlatl), and bow and arrows. Elite warriors also wore spectacular feathered and animal skin costumes and headdresses to signify their rank. Battles were concentrated in or around major cities and when these fell the victors claimed the whole surrounding territory. Regular tributes were extracted and captives were taken back to Tenochtitlan for ritual sacrifice. In this way the Aztec empire came to cover most of northern Mexico, an area of some 135,000 square kilometres.

The first of the Aztec figures will be available in December.

Please note the first of the Conquistadores will be previewed at the December London Toy Soldier show.


DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK


Another new jjDesigns series for 2018, will move the eighteenth century work towards the American Revolution with the “Drums Along The Mohawk” series. Will be available early 2018.

Primarily based on the book of Walter D. Edmonds who wrote about the area of upstate New York, and detailed the lives of pioneer farmers along the Mohawk River during the American Revolution.

Edmonds also wrote “The Matchlock Gun,” which was about a 10-year-old boy defending his home against Indians in colonial New York, and won the Newbery Medal for Children’s Literature in 1942. He also wrote about four women captives of Indians in 1778 in his 1947 book “In the Hands of the Senecas,” Edmonds’ books are considered the richest body of fiction about the time and region since the works of James Fenimore Cooper.

The series will also attempt to cover probably the most significant battle of the American Revolution.

The two Battles of Saratoga were a turning point in the American Revolution. On September 19th, British General John Burgoyne achieved a small, but costly victory over American forces led by Horatio Gates and Benedict Arnold. Though his troop strength had been weakened, Burgoyne again attacked the Americans at Bemis Heights on October 7th, but this time was defeated and forced to retreat. He surrendered ten days later, and the American victory convinced the French government to formally recognize the colonist’s cause and enter the war as their ally.

THE GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN


Turkish figures for the Gallipoli series. This included a two man machine gun team, an officer, as well as a Turkish sniper. The first of these sets should be available in the next few months.

Billy Sing was an elite sniper from Australia and his “duel” with his opposite number from Turkey called Abdul the Terrible, became the basis of Ion Idriess book “Lurking Death; The Stories of Snipers in Gallipoli, Sinai and Palestine”.

“Abdul the Sniper was the pride of the Turkish Army. They named his rifle ‘The Mother of Death’. Because, so declared the Ottoman Guard, ‘her breech gives birth to bullets which destroy the lives of men’,” Idriess wrote. One of the Turkish snipers victims was Private John Simpson Kirkpatrick, “the man with the donkey”. A party of “counter-snipers” led by Lieutenant Thomas Grace, Wellington Battalion NZEF, were briefed to take on the Turkish marksmen. Each sharpshooter had an observer or spotter with a telescope.

An equally terrible Australian sniper emerged who day by day killed man after man. The Australian sniper was trooper Billy Sing from Queensland of the 5th Light Horse. Abdul the Terrible was ordered to locate and kill him.
Idriess says he was one day acting as a spotter for Sing. He writes: “How many enemy this particular sniper shot will never be known but in three months his tally was one hundred and fifty.”
Adbul the Terrible would apparently examine any man who was shot through the head to try to establish the trajectory of the bullet and the likely location of the sniper from whom it was fired. His calculations led him to believe the shots were coming from one spot nearly on top of a trench across on Chatham’s Post.At night Abdul began to dig his cunning fox hole into which he would climb before dawn to lay there all day, staring across at Chatham’s Post.

As Idriess tells it, Abdul ignored other tempting targets but for a long time could not locate Sing, until one evening he reported to the officer in charge. “I have found him. I will kill him tomorrow.”
The next day, according to the account, another Anzac climbed into Sing’s hideout or “possy” but instinct apparently told Abdul this wasn’t the real man he was after and he, accordingly, withheld his fire.
Then Sing got into the possy and his observer suddenly alerted him not to open the loophole. Sing looked through the telescope. “Thus the Australian sniper stared into Abdul the Terrible’s eyes,” according to the text.

What happened next can only be left to Idriess

“The sniper, with his finger, slid back the loophole cover hardly an inch, then cautiously poked his rifle muzzle through…
“Careful,” murmured the observer. “He’s got the eyes of an eagle and – he’s staring straight here.” “It’s me or him,” grunted Sing.

“But had Abdul fired, even had his bullet come through that tiny slit, it wouldn’t have hit the sniper, for the born sniper knows the crouch that means the fractional difference between life and death. Only when the sniper actually had his eye aligned with his rifle sights then –

“That was what Abdul was waiting for. His big eyes staring, his rifle-muzzle slowly rising up… But Abdul did not know that the Australian sniper had seen him.

“Gently the peephole widened, then stopped close around the rifle. Abdul waited with finger on trigger, just awaiting that loophole to open the least fraction more. And – a bullet took him between the eyes.”

The Australian War Memorial states that the Turkish army immediately retaliated, aiming its heavy artillery at Billy’s hiding position and completely destroying it. Fortunately for the Australian sniper and his spotter, they had already evacuated to their unit trenches.

Great War


The Great War “Biker Girl”, will be available in October.

The importance of motorbikes during the Great War is all too often overlooked. Motorbikes were used for mounted infantry, scouts, dispatch and courier duties, ammunition carriers, medical supply carriers and casualty evacuation. The versatility of these machines clearly helped them play a hugely significant role in the logistics of the war, far more than the automobile.

The use that they were most commonly used for was that of the messenger. Because of the unreliability of communications technology during the war years, the motorbike’s virtue of speed meant that orders, reports and maps could be transferred between units quickly.
It was not only the men who got to ride around on motorbikes. The Women’s Royal Air Force (WRAF) made extensive use of motorbikes. The initial aim of the WRAF was to provide female mechanics so that men could be free to serve in the armed forces. Thanks to the high number of women volunteers, many also filled driver positions as well.

ARMIES AND ENEMIES OF ANCIENT ROME – SPARTACUS


Spartacus was a Thracian gladiator. Little is known about his life before he became one of the slave leaders in the Third Servile War, which was the slave uprising war against the Roman Republic.

Spartacus may have served in the Roman army, and it is generally believed he deserted, and led bandit raids. It is known he was captured and sold into slavery.
In 73 BC he escaped from a gladiatorial training school at Capua along with about 70 other gladiators. Taking refuge on Mount Vesuvius, along with other runaway slaves who the gladiators trained in rudimentary combat skills.
Spartacus it is believed became one of several leaders of the Gladiators’ revolt, along with two Gauls, Crixus and Oenamus.

Initially Rome did not regard the slave army as a serious force and did not send first line troops against it. Spartacus’ army outmaneuvered and defeated the first four forces it confronted, which led to more slaves joining the rebellion, and at its peak the army was believed to have been 90,000-120,000 strong.

Spartacus advocated crossing the Alps to put distance between the army and Rome and find freedom. One of the leaders, Crixus wanted to attack Rome itself where large numbers of slaves would also join them. This led to Crixus and 30,000 men leaving the main army to raid the countryside, who were eventually defeated and killed.

Spartacus won 3 more engagements and then for unknown reasons turned south instead of crossing the Alps, which threw Rome into a panic. A new Roman force under a competent commander named Marcus Crassus was sent to deal with the rebellious slave army, and after a long period of pursuit and a few engagements, the slave army was defeated near the headwaters of the Siler River in southern Italy.

Spartacus was killed, but his body was never found. The Romans crucified 6,000 rebellious slaves as a warning to others.

The story of Spartacus has served as inspiration for books, movies and tv series. He has often been made into a symbol for oppressed people rebelling to overturn their society, although he actually never attempted to overthrow Roman society, but just tried to lead his army to safety and freedom.

The Spartacus figure and more enemies of Rome will be available in 2018.

ROMAN FORT AND SIEGE DEFENCES


The first three prototype pieces of the Roman/Barbarian fort.

The Battle of Alesia or Siege of Alesia was a military engagement in the Gallic Wars that took place in September, 52 BC, around the Gallic oppidum (fortified settlement) of Alesia, a major centre of the Mandubii tribe. It was fought by the army of Julius Caesar against a confederation of Gallic tribes united under the leadership of Vercingetorix of the Arverni. It was the last major engagement between Gauls and Romans, and is considered one of Caesar’s greatest military achievements and a classic example of siege warfare and investment. The battle of Alesia marked the end of Gallic independence in France and Belgium.

In AD 60, the ICENI of East Anglia who were led by the legendary Boudica, rebelled against Roman rule, and were defeated in a battle fought it is believed somewhere in the midlands.
As a result of the rebellion the Romans built a series of fortifications in the area, which included Fort Lunt, near Coventry.

The Fort Lunt was built around AD60 to act as a supply depot and headquarters for the Roman Army during the final campaign against Boudica.
The Gateway has been inspired by the reconstructed Roman Gateway at Fort Lunt.

Alesia was an oppidum (fortified settlement) on a lofty hill, with two rivers on two different sides. Due to such strong defensive features, Caesar decided on a siege to force surrender by starvation. Considering that about 80,000 men were garrisoned in Alesia, together with the local civilian population, this would not have taken long.

To guarantee a perfect blockade, Caesar ordered the construction of an encircling set of fortifications, a circumvallation, around Alesia. It was eleven Roman miles long (16 km, each mile equivalent to around 1,000 left-foot steps, meaning one stepped with their right, then left) and had 24 redoubts (towers). While work was in progress, the Gauls carried out cavalry sallies to disrupt the construction. Caesar placed the legions in front of the camp in case of a sally by the infantry and got his Germanic allies to pursue the Gallic cavalry

Straight sections and corner sections will be available to produce a complete fort, or a suitable circumvallation defensive perimeter.

The jjDesigns Roman Fort will provide the perfect backdrop to either a Boudica Rebellion, or a Siege of Alesia display.

The Roman fort will be available early in 2018.

New John Jenkins September Releases!

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

THE ANCIENTS COLLECTION – ARMIES AND ENEMIES OF ANCIENT ROME




Enemies of Rome

ROMAN AUXILLIARY CAVALRY


Roman Auxiliary Cavalry were drawn from a wide range of warlike peoples throughout the provinces, especially on the fringes of the empire. They were generally not citizens of the Roman empire.

These auxilia cavalry provided a powerful fighting arm, they were well organized, disciplined, and well trained.

The four horned saddle, which was originally of Celtic origin, was an important part of cavalry equipment.

The four tall horns closed around and gripped the riders thighs, but did not inhibit free movement , which was especially important to spear armed horsemen. In an age which did not have the stirrup, the adoption of the four horned saddle allowed the horsemen to launch a missile effectively, or use both hands confidently to wield a shield and sword, during a melee.



Roman Auxiliary Cavalry

THE WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

THE BATTLE OF BUSHY RUN 1763




Battle of Bushy Run

RAID ON ST. FRANCIS 1959




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

FIRST SUDAN WAR 1884-1885


The Naval Brigade was a generic term used to define a body of Seamen, and Royal Marines, drawn from their ships and landed for active service under the orders of an army commander. Numbers were immaterial and it did not relate to an army Brigade. Often it would not even be of battalion strength.

Generally the armament of the Naval Brigade was made up of what was available from the parent ships, from where the Brigade was drawn.

The Gatling gun or its variants was the main weapon of the Naval Brigade in Egypt and the Sudan.



First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

AIRCRAFT CARRIER BASES


The Aircraft carriers during the second World War mainly had wooden decks.

The colour depended on the class of ship and when it was commissioned

It also depended on whether the ship received upgrades or had battle damage repairs.

To better camouflage the carriers from the air, the decks were treated with a dark blue stain, called “Deck Stain #21”.

It was approximately the same colour as the “Sea Blue” that the tops of the aircraft were painted during the tri colour scheme, but not as dark as the overall “midnight Blue” which aircraft were painted towards the end of the war.

Please note “BH CARRIER BASES” can be used as single, double or as a triple display.

The Double Base 19 ½” x 15” x ¾” (using any 2 of the 3 BH bases) can accommodate most 1/30 scale carrier fighters.

The Triple Base 29 ¼” x 15” x ¾” (using any 3 of the BH bases) can accommodate one 1/30 scale carrier fighter and 1 “parked” carrier fighter.

Please note BH Carrier Bases are designed to be displayed in sets of 3, “running Vertically”, as opposed to the IWA Carrier Bases which are designed to be displayed “running horizontally in sets of 2.


JJ WWII
Collection

New Jenkins August Releases!

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

Enemies of Rome


The Gauls were Celtic peoples inhabiting Gaul in the Iron Age and the Roman period (roughly from the 5th century BC to the 5th century AD).

The Gauls emerged around the 5th century BC as the bearers of the La Tène culture north of the Alps (spread across the lands between the Seine, Middle Rhine and upper Elbe). By the 4th century BC, they spread over much of what is now France, Belgium, Switzerland, Southern Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic by virtue of controlling the trade routes along the river systems of the Rhône, Seine, Rhine, and Danube, and they quickly expanded into Northern Italy, the Balkans, Transylvania and Galatia. Gaul was never united under a single ruler or government, but the Gallic tribes were capable of uniting their forces in large-scale military operations. They reached the peak of their power in the early 3rd century BC. The rising Roman Republic after the end of the First Punic War increasingly put pressure on the Gallic sphere of influence; the Battle of Telamon of 225 BC heralded a gradual decline of Gallic power over the 2nd century, until the eventual conquest of Gaul in the Gallic Wars of the 50s BC. After this, Gaul became a province of the Roman Empire, and the Gauls were culturally assimilated into a Gallo-Roman culture, losing their tribal identities by the end of the 1st century AD.

The carnyx may be described as a type of war trumpet. This instrument was a valveless horn that was made of beaten bronze, and can be easily recognized due to its shape. Another distinct feature of the carnyx is its bell, which often depicts the head of some animal. Such animals include boars, dragons, serpents, birds and wolves. The bells of the carnyx were fashioned after these animals so as to strike fear into enemy warriors. Additionally, some bells were made with joints at the jaws, which would cause the animal’s head to move when the instrument was blown, thus adding to the psychological effect it had on the enemy. Whilst the sight of the carnyx struck fear into the hearts of the enemy, it was the sound of it, which has been described as lugubrious and harsh, that probably had a greater impact on enemy morale. The instrument’s significant height also allowed it to be heard over the heads of the participants in battles or ceremonies.



Enemies of Rome

THE SECOND WORLD WAR – GERMAN ARMOUR


The Panzer I was a light tank produced in Germany in the 1930s. The name is short for the German Panzerkampfwagen I (“armored fighting vehicle mark I”), abbreviated PzKpfw I. The tank’s official German ordnance inventory designation was SdKfz 101 (“special purpose vehicle 101”).

Design of the Panzer I began in 1932 and mass production began in 1934. Intended only as a training tank to introduce the concept of armored warfare to the German Army, the Panzer I saw combat in Spain during the Spanish Civil War, in Poland, France, the Soviet Union and North Africa during the Second World War, and in China during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Experiences with the Panzer I during the Spanish Civil War helped shape the German Panzerwaffes’ invasion of Poland in 1939 and France in 1940. By 1941, the Panzer I chassis design was used as the basis of tank destroyers and assault guns. There were attempts to upgrade the Panzer I throughout its service history, including by foreign nations, to extend the design’s lifespan. It continued to serve in the Spanish Armed Forces until 1954.

The Panzer I’s performance in combat was limited by its thin armour and light armament of two machine guns. As a design intended for training, the Panzer I was not as capable as other light tanks of the era, such as the Soviet T-26. Although weak in combat, it formed a large part of Germany’s tank forces and was used in all major campaigns between September 1939 and December 1941. The small, vulnerable light tank would be surpassed in importance by other German tanks, such as the Panzer IV, Panther, and Tiger; nevertheless, the Panzer I’s contribution to the early victories of Nazi Germany during World War II was significant.

Lesson learned from the Panzerkampfwagen I provided the German designers and manufacturers with valuable experience in designing and producing the next generation of new panzers that were soon to come. Although, Panzerkampfwagen I was not a truly valuable combat tank, it proved to be an excellent training tank and most of the panzer crews were trained on Panzerkampfwagen I until the end of the war or operated it in combat as their first armoured vehicle.

There have been many requests over the years for jjDesigns to produce Pz 1A’s for the Second World War. Although GA-10A has generic markings, there will be other tanks produced with specific unit markings, to represent tanks from The Invasion of Poland through and even Chiang Kai-shek’s National Government Army in China.

THE INVASION OF POLAND, 1st September 1939


On 1 September 1939, Germany invaded Poland The invasion was swift and the last Polish pockets of resistance surrendered on 6 October. The entire campaign had lasted five weeks and the success of Germany’s tanks in the campaign was summed up in response to Hitler on 5 September: when asked if it had been the dive bombers who destroyed a Polish artillery regiment, Guderian replied, “No, our panzers!”

GA-11A represents a Panzer Division tank from the opening of the war in Poland. The Panzer I Ausf A represents a fighting vehicle of the 5. Kompanie while the Panzer I Ausf B (available at a later date) represents a staff tank of the I. Abteilung, Panzer Regiment 35.

The 4th Panzer Division, as part of the XVI. Armeekorps, was one of the first divisions of Heeresgruppe Süd (Army Group South) to cross the Polish border on September 1st, 1939. It fought against Polish cavalry at the Battle of Mokra and was the first German unit to reach Warsaw. It suffered heavy casualties in its initial direct assault to take the city and in subsequent attempts to take the city fighting alongside the Liebstandarte SS Adolf Hitler Regiment. Later it fought in the Battle of the Bazura (Battle of Kutno), the largest battle of the Polish campaign.

After Poland, the division fought against the British Expeditionary Force during the Battle of France and then on the Eastern Front for the remainder of the war.

Jagdpanther


I apologize that many customers were not able to get the first Jagdpanter. I have decided to re-stock this item, but as I had already made several small changes to the original prototype I was unable to produce an exact replica of the GA-01 model.
For example the front machine gun on the original GA-01 did not move. I have now re-worked the prototype so that the front machine gun now moves. Therefore I have decided to re-stock the model and re-number the tank #121.
If you are still interested in purchasing this new version, contact us. All pre-orders for GA-01(121) received by the 31st August will be produced.


JJ WWII
Collection

Interwar Aviation


The Boeing P-12/F4B was an American pursuit aircraft that was operated by the United States Army Air Corps and United States Navy. Though best known in later years for producing large bomber or transport aircraft, Boeing produced a series of excellent fighters from 1923 to 1933. The most famous of those biplane fighters, the F4B, was the refinement of design experience gained from its FB, F2B and F3B predecessors. Nimble, rugged and reliable, the F4B-4’s debut coincided nicely with advances in carrier operations aboard the new carriers Lexington (CV-2) and Saratoga (CV-3). The aircraft remained the Navy and Marine Corps’ first-line fighter until replaced by faster and more powerful Grumman biplanes.

VF-6B, known as the “Fighting Six” had as their mascot, “Felix The Cat”, a well known cartoon character of the time. The lit bomb he carries relates to when the squadron first started as a Bombing Squadron in 1929. “Felix The Cat” is one of the longest serving squadron insignia in the US Navy.

The white tails of the aircraft were the squadron’s carrier identification colour during their service aboard the USS Saratoga.

The Navy Bureau Number (BuNo.) 9020 was the Section Leader in the Squadron’s Fourth Section, whose identification colour was black. The Section leader carried a full black cowl, the second aircraft displayed a top half black cowl, and the third a bottom half black cowl. All aircraft displayed wing chevrons in the section colour, and their individual aircraft number on their upperwing.

SECTION MARKINGS OF SQUADRONS

In December 1930, the US Bureau of Aeronautics directed that all aircraft under construction be painted using a scheme of section markings that would visually identify their position in the squadron. The normal squadron strength was 18 aircraft. This was divided into two divisions of three sections, and each section was made up of three aircraft. The first division was made up of sections, 1,2,3 and the second division was made up of sections 4,5,and 6. Normally the squadron Commander would lead the first division as Section Leader of Section 1, and his Executive officer would lead the second division as Section Leader of Section 4.

CARRIER TAIL MARKINGS

The first instruction to allocate a colour to all squadrons operating from the same carrier came in 1935, as it was creating confusion by the different tail colours that squadrons were selecting. In the 1935 directive the colours were white for USS Saratoga.

INTERWAR AVIATION AIRCRAFT CARRIER BASES

USS Saratoga (CV-3) was a Lexington-class aircraft carrier built for the United States Navy during the 1920s. Originally designed as a battlecruiser, she was converted into one of the Navy’s first aircraft carriers during construction to comply with the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. The ship entered service in 1928 and was assigned to the Pacific Fleet for her entire career. Saratoga and her sister ship, Lexington, were used to develop and refine carrier tactics in a series of annual exercises before World War II. On more than one occasion these included successful surprise attacks on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. She was one of three prewar US fleet aircraft carriers, along with Enterprise and Ranger, to serve throughout World War II.



Inter-War Aviation Collection

War of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Battle of the
Plains of Abraham


The 78th Regiment, (Highland) Regiment of Foot otherwise known as the 78th Fraser Highlanders was a British infantry regiment of the line raised in Scotland in 1757, to fight in the Seven Years’ War . The 78th Regiment was one of the first three Highland Regiments to fight in North America.
The regiment was raised in Inverness by Lieutenant-Colonel Simon Fraser of Lovat as the 2nd Highland Battalion and ranked as the 62nd Regiment of Foot in 1757. It was re-ranked as the 63rd Regiment of Foot later in the year. The regiment embarked for Halifax, Nova Scotia in July 1757 and, having been renamed the 78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot, or Fraser’s Highlanders in June 1758, it took part in the Siege of Louisbourg later that month, the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in September 1759 and the capture of Montreal in August 1760. It was disbanded in Quebec in December 1763. In the Seven Years’ War, the regiment at 103 soldiers killed and 383 wounded.



Battle of the Plains of Abraham

WWI – Egypt 195




Egypt 1915

New John Jenkins June Releases!

Saturday, June 3rd, 2017

Knights of the Skies


The Airco DH.2 was a single-seat biplane “pusher” aircraft which operated as a fighter during the First World War. It was the second pusher design by Geoffrey de Havilland for Airco, based on his earlier DH.1 two-seater. The DH.2 was the first effectively armed British single-seat fighter and enabled Royal Flying Corps (RFC) pilots to counter the “Fokker Scourge” that had given the Germans the advantage in the air in late 1915. Until the British developed a synchronisation gear to match the German system, pushers such as the DH.2 and the F.E.2b carried the burden of fighting and escort duties.

This was the plane flown by Maj. Hawker on 23rd November 1916, when he had his fateful encounter with Ltn Manfred Von Richthofen of Jasta 2.

**PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO THE STRUCTURAL POSITION OF THE UNDERCARRIAGE THE NORMAL FLIGHT STAND SCREWS AND WASHERS WILL NOT BE SUITABLE. A SPECIAL NEW LONGER SCREW AND WASHER WILL BE INCLUDED IN EACH SET. THESE CAN BE USED WITH ANY OF THE FLIGHT STANDS.**



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Battle of Gallipoli 1915


In 1914, all infantry battalions, and Mounted Rifles Regiments were equipped with a machine gun section of two guns, which was increased to four in February 1915.

Machine guns inflicted appalling casualties in World War One. Men who went over-the-top in trenches stood little chance when the enemy opened up with their machine guns. Machine guns were one of the main killers in the war and accounted for many thousands of deaths.


Battle of Gallipoli 1915

Raid on St Francis




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Provincial Regiments




Provincial Regiments 1759

Jacobite Rebellion 1745




Jacobite Rebellion 1745

War of the Roses


Rhys ap Thomas (1449–1525),is a Welsh name meaning, Rhys son of Thomas, and was a Welsh soldier and landholder who rose to prominence during the Wars of the Roses, and was instrumental in the victory of Henry Tudor at the Battle of Bosworth. He remained a faithful supporter of Henry and was rewarded with lands and offices in South Wales. Some sources claim that he personally delivered the death blow to King Richard III at Bosworth with his poleaxe.

Rhys ap Thomas had declined to support Buckingham’s earlier uprising. In the aftermath, when Richard appointed officers to replace those who had joined the revolt, he made Rhys ap Thomas his principal lieutenant in south west Wales and granted him an annuity for life of 40 marks. Rhys was required to send his son Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Thomas to the King’s court at Nottingham as a hostage, but he excused himself from this obligation by claiming that nothing could bind him to his duty more strongly than his conscience. He is supposed to have taken an oath that
“Whoever ill-affected to the state, shall dare to land in those parts of Wales where I have any employment under your majesty, must resolve with himself to make his entrance and irruption over my belly.”

On 1 August 1485, Henry set sail from Harfleur in France. With fair winds, he landed at Mill Bay near Dale on the north side of Milford Haven, close to his birthplace in Pembroke Castle, with a force of English exiles and French mercenaries. At this point, Rhys should have engaged him. However, Rhys instead joined Henry. Folklore has it that the Bishop of St. David’s offered to absolve him from his previous oath to Richard. The Bishop also suggested that Rhys fulfil the strict letter of his vow by lying down and letting Henry step over him. This undignified procedure might have weakened Rhys’s authority over his men, so instead, Rhys is said to have stood under the Mullock Bridge about 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Dale while Henry marched over it.

Henry’s and Rhys’s forces marched separately through Wales, with Rhys recruiting 500 men as he proceeded. They rejoined at Welshpool before crossing into England. Rhys’s Welsh force was described as being large enough to have “annihilated” the rest of Henry’s army. On 22 August, they met Richard’s army near Market Bosworth. In the resulting Battle of Bosworth, Richard launched an attack led by John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. According to a contemporary ballad, Rhys’s men halted the assault. “Norfolk’s line began to break under pressure from Rhys ap Thomas’s men” and the Duke was killed by an arrow shot. Hoping to turn the tide and win the battle rapidly by killing his rival, Richard and his companion knights charged directly at Henry. The king was unhorsed and surrounded. The poet Guto’r Glyn implies that Rhys himself was responsible for killing Richard, possibly with a poll axe. Referring to Richard’s emblem of a boar, the poet writes that Rhys “killed the boar, shaved his head” (“Lladd y baedd, eilliodd ei ben”). However, this may only mean that one of Rhys’s Welsh halberdiers killed the king, since the Burgundian chronicler Jean Molinet, says that a Welshman, one of Rhys’ men suspected to be Wyllyam Gardynyr, struck the death-blow with a halberd. Guto’r Glyn himself says that Rhys was “like the stars of a shield with the spear in their midst on a great steed” (“A Syr Rys mal sŷr aesaw, Â’r gwayw’n eu mysg ar gnyw mawr”). He was knighted on the field of battle.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

New John Jenkins May Releases!

Saturday, April 29th, 2017

Knights Of The Skies


The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during World War I. It was the pre-eminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as “Bloody April” 1917.

Early D.IIIs featured a radiator in the center of the upper wing, where it tended to scald the pilot if punctured. From the 290th D.III onward, the radiator was offset to the right, on production machines while others were soon moved to the right as a field modification. Aircraft deployed in Palestine used two wing radiators, to cope with the warmer climate.

Von Richthofen and most other German aces won the majority of their victories on the D.III, and it even turned out to be more successful than its alleged successor, and continued in production for several months after the introduction of the D.V.

Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft on the Western Front. 1,866 Albatros D.III planes were produced.

The D.III did not disappear with the end of production, however. It remained in frontline service well into 1918.

As late as March 1918, there were still nearly 200 D.IIIs in service on the Western Front, eight months even after the introduction of its successor.
identified as the machine flown by Ltn. Erich Lowenhardt of Jasta 10. This DIII had a white wavy “snake –line” applied to the fuselage sides and top surface of the upper wing. The standard yellow Jasta 10 nose colour was also applied, as well as a small personal number “15”.

** PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A RE-STOCK of ACE-07 BUT UPGRADED WITH NEW DETAILS AND MATERIALS**



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Wheels of the Desert


The 1st Light Car Patrol was formed in Melbourne during 1916 as part of the Australian Imperial Force during World War I.

First named the 1st Armoured Car Section, it was also known as the 1st Armoured Car Battery.

The unit fought against the Senussi in the Sudan and Western Desert. The 1st Armoured Car Section became the 1st Light Car Patrol on 3 December.

As their original three armoured car vehicles became worn out from hard use in the Western Desert and were irreparable due to shortages of spare parts, the unit was re-equipped with six model T-Ford light cars.

The cars were given names: Anzac, Billzac, Osatal, Silent Sue, Imshi and Bung.

These were traded in for six new Fords on 11 December 1917.

In May 1917 the unit was redeployed to Palestine by rail, and served throughout the campaign there. Like similar British units of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force it was used to conduct long range reconnaissance and patrol duties, often operating well in advance of forward cavalry units. By November 1918 they had reached Aleppo with the British Indian 5th Cavalry Division, where they were believed to be the furthest advanced Australian unit at the conclusion of the campaign.

The Long Range Desert Group was the brain child of Major Ralph Gagnold, Royal Signal Corps. To understand how the LRDG came about we must go back to 1916.

Italy had occupied Lybia in 1911, and although had been at war with the Senussi, an Islamic Religious sect, with Germany’s help they were able to persuade the Senussi to join the fight against the British.

The Senussi were expert raiders who could seemingly strike from nowhere and then disappear. Their usual method of attack was on camel back, and the Senussi were better fighters on camel back and they knew the desert well than the British camel mounted regiments which were initially formed to combat the Senussi threat.

The senussi camels were however vulnerable to artillery and machine gun fire. But mobility was needed to chase down the raiders. The answer came from the use of armoured cars, specifically the Rolls-Royce, but they could not keep pace with the fast moving camels, and were quick to bog down in the desert.

What was needed was a lighter more reliable car, that could move swiftly and carry the additional fire power. This was the modified Ford Model T and gave birth to the Light Car Patrols.
The LCP patrols operated in modified Ford Model T’s armed with Lewis machine guns, had wider tires, radiator condensers, and primitive sun compasses.

By a combination of LCP’s, Rolls Royce armoured cars, camel corps, and BE2 aircraft, the British were able to defeat the Senussi. With the end of WW1 the LCP was disbanded, however the lessons were not forgotten.


Egypt
1915

Conestoga wagon


The Conestoga wagon is a heavy, covered wagon that was used extensively during the late eighteenth century and the nineteenth century in the eastern United States and Canada. It was large enough to transport loads up to 6 tons.

It was drawn by horses, mules, or oxen.

It was designed to help keep its contents from moving about when in motion and to aid it in crossing rivers and streams, though it sometimes leaked unless caulked.

The term “Conestoga wagon” refers specifically to this type of vehicle; it is not a generic term for “covered wagon”. The wagons used in the westward expansion of the United States were, for the most part, ordinary farm wagons fitted with canvas covers. A true Conestoga wagon was too heavy for use on the prairies.

The first known mention of a “Conestoga wagon” was by James Logan on December 31, 1717 in his accounting log after purchasing it from James Hendricks.It was named after the “Conestoga River” or “Conestoga Township” in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and thought to have been introduced by Mennonite German settlers. The Brethren of Lancaster County, an offshoot sect of the Mennonites, said that there was a local Native American tribe called the Conestoga.

The left horse near the wagon was referred to as the wheel horse and was sometimes ridden. The Conestoga wagon began the custom of “driving” on the right-hand side of the road.

**PLEASE NOTE THE WAGON COMES PACKED WITH SEPARATE WHEELS ….. and a pair of tweezers**

**PLEASE NOTE HORSES ARE NOT INCLUDED, PLEASE USE BAL-03 HORSE SETS**



Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Birch Bark Canoes


Birch Bark Canoes were the main type and mode of transportation used by the Native American tribes who inhabited the Northeast woodlands, and eastern Canada. The design and style of the birch bark canoes were based on the natural resources that were available to the tribes, in this instance the people made use of the numerous birch trees found in the forests and woodlands of their tribal lands. The tribes built canoes made from the bark of the birch trees over a wooden frame. These canoes were broad enough to float in shallow streams, strong enough to shoot dangerous rapids, and light enough for one man to easily carry a canoe on his back.

The birch bark canoes were built in many different sizes. They could be used by a single person but were usually built for 4 – 6 people. Some of the war canoes could take up to 12 Native Indians

The Huron canoes measured about 21 feet long (7 metres) and 3 feet wide (1 metre) and could carry four or five men and about 200 pounds of cargo (91 kilograms). Their ability to travel long distances was seen as great assets by the French who quickly allied with the Huron to gain an advantage in the lucrative beaver fur trade

These sets are perfect for collectors wishing to add some extra elements to their dioramas. Also the canoes can be used with the additional Indian sets CAN-04 and CAN-07.

Additional Woodland Indian and French militia sets will be added in the future.


Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Wars of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Battle of Bushy Run


The Battle of Bushy Run was fought on August 5-6, 1763, in western Pennsylvania, between a British column under the command of Colonel Henry Bouquet and a combined force of Delaware, Shawnee, Mingo, and Huron warriors. This action occurred during Pontiac’s Rebellion. Though the British suffered serious losses, they routed the Native American Tribesmen and successfully relieved the garrison of Fort Pitt.

It was to become a situation that closely resembled the predicament of Braddock years earlier at the Battle on the Monongahela. An advance guard ran into hostiles, then support was sent forward, musket fire broke out, from the woods on both flanks and the rear of the main British force.

It seemed it was Braddock’s Defeat all over again. The difference it seems was the maintenance of order and the troops’ confidence in their commander.

Colonel Henry Bouquet formed up in a near-hollow square on a hillside.

During the second day of fighting, Bouquet decided upon trickery. He feigned a retreat, lured the woodland Indian tribesmen in, then hit them on the flanks with his light infantry companies.

The maneuver was successful. Though Indian casualties were lighter than that of the British, the Battle of Bushy Run, August 5 & 6, 1763, was over, and broke the back of Indian resistance in these parts. Fort Pitt was relieved. The settlements came and a great city would one day stand at this fork in a wilderness river.

The relief column under Colonel Henry Bouquet, consisted of about 500 British soldiers, from the 60th Royal Americans, 42nd Highland Regiment, and the 77th Highland Regiment.

The 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot was a Scottish infantry regiment in the British Army also known as the Black Watch. Originally titled Crawford’s Highlanders or The Highland Regiment and numbered 43rd in the line, in 1748, on the disbanding of Oglethorpe’s Regiment of Foot, they were renumbered 42nd and in 1751 formally titled the 42nd (Highland) Regiment of Foot.

The 77th Regiment of Foot (Montgomerie’s Highlanders) was a Highland Regiment raised in 1757. The regiment was raised at Stirling by Major Archibald Montgomerie as the 1st Highland Battalion and ranked as the 62nd Regiment of Foot in 1757. It was renamed the 77th Regiment of Foot (Montgomery’s Highlanders) in June 1758. The regiment participated in the capture of Fort Duquesne in November 1758. It sailed for the West Indies in June 1761 and took part in the Invasion of Martinique in January 1762 and the Battle of Havana in June 1762. It went on to New York City in October 1762 and saw action at the Battle of Bushy Run in August 1763 after which it was disbanded later in the year.



Battle of Bushy Run

10th Anniversary


Another of John’s aims for the 10th Anniversary was to release a 2006/2007 Collectors Club Annual. Unfortunately, again due to circumstances beyond his control he was unable to produce the Annual. The Annual was to be accompanied by a special 44th Regiment of foot, Grenadier figure, to commemorate the first set that was released. Since he had managed to produce the figure, this has now been released on its own without the Annual. The 2006/2007 Annual will not now be produced.



Battle of Monongahela, 1755

John Jenkins's Fokker DVII

Sunday, March 26th, 2017

John Jenkins’s Fokker DVII


We thought you may enjoy 3 paintings inspired by John Jenkins World War One Aircraft. The paintings are by a very talented artist and a great customer Robert Horvath. He was nice enough to share these with us. Hope you enjoy.

My association with John Jenkins and Sierra Toy Soldier Company goes back a number of years. One of the first of John’s AC I purchased was the Nieuport 17. After I received the model I had some email back and forth with John about the plane and told him I was going to use it as my “model” for a few paintings dealing with the Lafayette Escadrille. I prepared sketches for the first painting and sent them along to John. He suggested I write something for his annual about the creation of that painting and I did.


We also discussed German AC with Lozenge Camouflage and he sent me photos of the prototype of Wilhelm Leusch Fokker DVII emblazoned with the dragon. I wanted to do a painting for John and I decided to do this particular Fokker. I started the painting a year and a half ago. In the process of painting it I was preparing to retire, sell our home (with studio) and move. The painting was put on the back burner for a long time and was finally finished last Fall.

I love WWI aviation and the models John is making are really beautiful pieces of art. I have all of WWI aircraft except the Sopwith Camel and I should rectify this.


Bob Horvath

New John Jenkins Future Releases – Announced at the London Show!

Saturday, March 25th, 2017



NEW – ARMIES AND ENEMIES OF ROME
Coming soon, Ancient Celts!

The first wave of Ancient Celts/Gauls will start to be available soon.
I have split the release into two, half the figures (7 pieces) will be previewed at the March London show, with the other 8 figures previewed at the June London show.

NEW – WARS OF THE ROSES PROTOTYPES
Five new prototypes for the Wars of The Roses series were previewed at the March London show.
These will be available in the second half of this year.



The first of several casualty figures, will be the mounted knight on the falling wounded horse.
This period was interesting as it was the domination of the longbow, which led to a major change in medieval warfare tactics. Knights now would only ride their mounts to the battlefield, as it was impossible to fully armour the horses to protect against the arrows, during the actual battle.
Therefore the Battle Of Bosworth Field is fairly unique in that there was a cavalry charge!


Apart from a couple of casualty figures, these will be the final archer figures.




As the series progresses I will plan to add a few new retinues.
This new figure will represent Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1443 – 21 May 1524), who was the only son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by his first wife, Katherine Moleyns.

NEW – WHEELS ACROSS THE DESERT
The first three Model T Ford cars with crews were previewed at the London show.


The 1st Light Car Patrol was formed in Melbourne during 1916 as part of the Australian Imperial Force during World War I.
First named the 1st Armoured Car Section, it was also known as the 1st Armoured Car Battery.
The unit fought against the Senussi in the Sudan and Western Desert. The 1st Armoured Car Section became the 1st Light Car Patrol on 3 December.
As their original three armoured car vehicles became worn out from hard use in the Western Desert and were irreparable due to shortages of spare parts, the unit was re-equipped with six model T-Ford light cars.

The cars were given names: Anzac, Billzac, Osatal, Silent Sue, Imshi and Bung.
These were traded in for six new Fords on 11 December 1917.
In May 1917 the unit was redeployed to Palestine by rail, and served throughout the campaign there. Like similar British units of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force it was used to conduct long range reconnaissance and patrol duties, often operating well in advance of forward cavalry units. By November 1918 they had reached Aleppo with the British Indian 5th Cavalry Division, where they were believed to be the furthest advanced Australian unit at the conclusion of the campaign.
The Long Range Desert Group was the brain child of Major Ralph Gagnold, Royal Signal Corps. To understand how the LRDG came about we must go back to 1916.


Italy had occupied Lybia in 1911, and although had been at war with the Senussi, an Islamic Religious sect, with Germany’s help they were able to persuade the Senussi to join the fight against the British.
The Senussi were expert raiders who could seemingly strike from nowhere and then disappear. Their usual method of attack was on camel back, and the Senussi were better fighters on camel back and they knew the desert well than the British camel mounted regiments which were initially formed to combat the Senussi threat.
The senussi camels were however vulnerable to artillery and machine gun fire. But mobility was needed to chase down the raiders.
The answer came from the use of armoured cars, specifically the Rolls-Royce, but they could not keep pace with the fast moving camels, and were quick to bog down in the desert.
What was needed was a lighter more reliable car, that could move swiftly and carry the additional fire power.
This was the modified Ford Model T and gave birth to the Light Car Patrols.


The LCP patrols operated in modified Ford Model T’s armed with Lewis machine guns, had wider tires, radiator condensers, and primitive sun compasses.
By a combination of LCP’s, Rolls Royce armoured cars, camel corps, and BE2 aircraft, the British were able to defeat the Senussi.
With the end of WW1 the LCP was disbanded, however the lessons were not forgotten.

NEW – WW2 SERIES


SCALE 1/30
The first WW2 German Tank, by jjDesigns, will be a JAGPANTHER G1(Late Version)
This will have, opening doors and hatches, interior detail, engine detail, and removable/interchangeable side panels.

The Jagdpanther (“hunting panther”) was a tank destroyer built by Germany during World War II based on the chassis of the Panther tank. It entered service late in the war (1944) and saw service on the Eastern and Western Fronts. The Jagdpanther combined the very powerful 8.8 cm KwK 43 cannon of the Tiger II and the characteristically excellent armor and suspension of the Panther chassis


It was manned by a crew of five: a driver, radio-operator, commander, gunner and a loader. Figures will be available separately at a later date.


A total of 415 Jagdpanthers were produced from January 1944 by three manufacturers. MIAG produced 270 from January 1944 until the end of the war. Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen-Hannover (MNH) produced 112 from November 1944. Maschinenbau und Bahnbedarf (MBA) produced 37 vehicles from December 1944. Planned production had been 150 a month, but the disruption to German manufacturing had made this impossible.


Jagdpanthers equipped heavy antitank battalions (schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung) and served mainly on the Eastern Front.
In the West, they were first encountered in very small numbers late in the Battle of Normandy, where the German 654 schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung (“654th Heavy Antitank Battalion”) deployed about 12 Jagdpanthers against British units.
Later, significant numbers were concentrated in the West for the Ardennes Offensive.






New John Jenkins April Releases!

Saturday, March 25th, 2017

KNIGHTS OF THE SKIES


The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during World War I. It was the pre-eminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as “Bloody April” 1917.

Early D.IIIs featured a radiator in the center of the upper wing, where it tended to scald the pilot if punctured. From the 290th D.III onward, the radiator was offset to the right, on production machines while others were soon moved to the right as a field modification. Aircraft deployed in Palestine used two wing radiators, to cope with the warmer climate.

Von Richthofen and most other German aces won the majority of their victories on the D.III, and it even turned out to be more successful than its alleged successor, and continued in production for several months after the introduction of the D.V.

Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft on the Western Front. 1,866 Albatros D.III planes were produced.

The D.III did not disappear with the end of production, however. It remained in frontline service well into 1918.

As late as March 1918, there were still nearly 200 D.IIIs in service on the Western Front, eight months even after the introduction of its successor.

The WW1 German lozenge patterns are some of the most interesting and distinctive camouflage schemes ever devised.

During the early stages of the Great War, the Germans were looking for a way to effectively camouflage the aircraft of the Luftstreitkräfte to inhibit enemy observation of the aircraft while it was in the air as well as when at rest on the ground. Large, irregular blotches with two or three colors were used on the upper surfaces of the wing which led to the development of the Buntfarbenanstrich, the lozenge camouflage made up of repeating patterns of irregularly shaped four-, five- or six-sided polygons. Because painting such a pattern was very time consuming, and the paint added considerably to the weight of the aircraft, the patterns were printed on fabric, and the fabric was then used to cover the aircraft. This printed fabric was used in various forms and colors from late 1916 until the end of the war.

Lozenge camouflage was a German military camouflage scheme in the form of patterned cloth or painted designs, used by some aircraft in the last two years of World War I.

It takes its name from the repeated polygon shapes incorporated in the designs, many of which resembled lozenges.

In Germany it was called Buntfarbenaufdruck (multi-colored print) but this designation includes other camouflage designs such as Splittermuster and Leibermuster, and does not include hand-painted camouflage.

Some modern German sources refer to lozenge camouflage as Lozenge-Tarnung, as tarnung means concealment, cloaking or camouflage.


GEORGES GUYNEMAR ,24 December 1894 – 11 September 1917 missing) was a top fighter ace for France with 54 victories during World War I, and a French national hero.

Guynemer was lionized by the French press and became a national hero. The French government encouraged the publicity to boost morale and take the people’s minds off the terrible losses in the trenches. Guynemer was embarrassed by the attention, but his shyness only increased the public’s appetite to know everything about him.

Guynemer’s death was a profound shock to France; nevertheless, he remained an icon for the duration of the war. Only 22 at his death, he continued to inspire the nation with his advice, “Until one has given all, one has given nothing.”

Guynemer started flying this machine in late July, and went on to score his 53rd victory on 20th August 1917. Unfortunately this was the plane in which Guynemer was to mysteriously go missing in, on 11th September 1917.

Guynemer failed to return from the combat mission on 11 September 1917. At 08:30, with rookie pilot Jean Bozon-Verduraz, Guynemer took off in his Spad XIII S.504 n°2. His mission was to patrol the Langemark area. At 09:25, near Poelkapelle, Guynemer sighted a lone Rumpler, a German observation plane, and dove toward it. Bozon-Verduraz saw several Fokkers above him, and by the time he had shaken them off, his leader was nowhere in sight, so he returned alone. Guynemer never came back.

It was a French journalist who explained to schoolchildren, “Captain Guynemer flew so high he could not come down again.”



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

THE PENINSULAR WAR 1807-1814




Peninsular War 1807-1814

Jacobite Rebellion




Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Raid on St Francis


Birch Bark Canoes were the main type and mode of transportation used by the Native American tribes who inhabited the Northeast woodlands, and eastern Canada. The design and style of the birch bark canoes were based on the natural resources that were available to the tribes, in this instance the people made use of the numerous birch trees found in the forests and woodlands of their tribal lands. The tribes built canoes made from the bark of the birch trees over a wooden frame. These canoes were broad enough to float in shallow streams, strong enough to shoot dangerous rapids, and light enough for one man to easily carry a canoe on his back.

The birch bark canoes were built in many different sizes. They could be used by a single person but were usually built for 4 – 6 people. Some of the war canoes could take up to 12 Native Indians

The Huron canoes measured about 21 feet long (7 metres) and 3 feet wide (1 metre) and could carry four or five men and about 200 pounds of cargo (91 kilograms). Their ability to travel long distances was seen as great assets by the French who quickly allied with the Huron to gain an advantage in the lucrative beaver fur trade.

PLEASE NOTE IT IS POSSIBLE TO ADD EXTRA FIGURES TO THE LARGE CANOE. THESE ARE AVAILABLE BY USING FIGURES FROM SETS CAN-04A and CAN-04B, OR THE NEW CAN-07.

UP TO FIVE FIGURES CAN FIT INTO THE LARGE CANOE.

PLEASE NOTE IF EXTRA FIGURES ARE ADDED, THE ACCESSORY PIECES WILL NOT BE ABLE TO FIT.

ALSO PLEASE NOTE THAT CANOE SETS WITHOUT FIGURES WILL BE AVAILABLE NEXT MONTH. **PLEASE NOTE THAT IT IS POSSIBLE TO ADD CAN-04 TO THE CAN-06 SET



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

FRENCH MILITIA




French Militia 1759

THE WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

jjDESIGNS 10th ANNIVERSARY


Therefore for FEBRUARY we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with THREE more “BOOSTER/STARTER” Sets!

These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of MARCH or until stock runs out.



Australian Imperial Force

New John Jenkins March Releases

Sunday, February 19th, 2017

War of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Provincial Regiments




Provincial Regiments 1759

10th Anniversery Sets


These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of MARCH or until stock runs out.



Provincial Regiments 1759

French Militia




French Militia 1759

Peninsular War 1807-1814


Baron Dominique Jean Larrey served as Surgeon-in-chief of the French Napoleonic armies from Italy in 1797 to Waterloo in 1815. During this time, he implemented the modern method of having an Army Surgery, field hospitals and a system of ambulances. After he had seen the speed with which the carriages of the French artillery managed to maneuver around the battlefields, Larrey adapted a similar system of Ambulances for rapid transportation of the wounded, and also manned them with trained crews of drivers, and litter bearers.

Larrey also increased the mobility and improved the organization of field hospitals, effectively creating a forerunner of the modern MASH units. He established a rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the seriousness of their injuries and urgency of need for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality. Soldiers of enemy armies, as well as those of the French and their allies, were treated.



Peninsular War 1807-1814

Knights of the Skies


The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918.
In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft. The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.

This aircraft was flown by Wilhelm Leusch and featured a fire breathing dragon on the fuselage inspired by an Unterberg & Helme company advertisement.
Leusch was made commander of Jasta 19 in October 1918 and scored 5 victories. He was only 29 when he died in a glider accident in August 1921.

Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel 19 was founded on 25th October 1916, and was designated a “Hunting Group”, (i.e. a fighter squadron)
It flew its first combat patrols five days before Christmas, 1916. The new Jasta drew first blood on 6 April 1917, credit being given to Leutnant Walter Böning. On 2 February 1918, Jasta 19 was detailed into Jagdgeschwader II along with Jasta 12, Jasta 13, and Jasta 15.

The unit would score 92 verified aerial victories, including ten wins over enemy observation balloons. In turn, their casualties for the war would amount to eleven pilots killed in action, four wounded in action, and one taken prisoner of war.
Jasta 19 commander, Lt. Oliver von Beaulieu-Marconnay, was killed in action and superceded by Ltn R Wilhelm Leusch in October 1918. He led Jasta 19 until the end of the war, while the unit was based in Trier.

The overall paint scheme is typical of Jasta 19 markings, when the yellow nose was representative, while the blue fuselage was the Jagdgeschwader II marking. Jagdgeswader II units were Jasta 12 with a white nose, Jasta 13 with a green nose, Jasta 15 with a red nose and the already noted yellow nose of Jasta 19.


At the outbreak of hostilities in August 1914 Crossley Motors moved almost totally to war production. The only model made was the 20/25 which was supplied to the forces in huge numbers with production running at up to 45 a week. The first had been supplied to the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) in 1913 and at the outbreak of war they had 56. By the time of the armistice this had risen to over 6000.
Every squadron in the RFC was supposed to be equipped with nine Tenders and one Staff Touring Car but it seems likely that most never had the full complement. Vehicles went to France, Belgium, Mesopotamia, Salonica, Egypt, Russia, India and several parts of Africa.

The 34 cwt Tender had room for eleven men, three in front with the remainder facing each other on bench seats down each side of the rear. Weather protection was by two hoods, one for the front and one for the rear.

After the war the 20/25 continued in use by the RAF for several years and saw service in Iraq, Persia and India. The 20/25 model was also the first vehicle to be supplied to London’s Metropolitan Police Flying Squad in 1920, some of which were fitted with radio equipment.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI