Hobby Master – New Arrivals

November 12th, 2017




Hobby Master – New Arrivals

Corgi – New Arrivals

November 12th, 2017



Corgi

New Collectors Showcase November Releases!

November 12th, 2017

Rome



Roman Collection

German WWII




German WWII

Vietnam




Vietnam

120mm Statues


  • CS16005 WWI German Landser
    This WWI 42nd Regiment German Landser is of poly resin and metal construction.
    Beautifully hand painted atop a wooden walnut finished base.
  • CS16006 Fallschirmjager At Rest
    – Our WWII Fallschirmjager is perfect for the battle of Carentan. Beautifully
    hand painted atop a wooden walnut finished base.
  • CS16007 Union Flagbearer 1862
    – Our Union flagbearer 1862 is of polyresin and metal construction. Beautifully
    hand painted atop a wooden walnut finished base.


120mm Statues

Masterworks


  • CS60014 Crazy Horse 1/6th Scale – Crazy Horse exemplifies the grandeur and bravery of the Lakota people. Placed at the right time and place to defend the Indians rights to the lands they had known for centuries: Little Big Horn. Our Crazy Horse statue is a perfect
    bookend to our G.A.Custer statue.
  • CS60015 General Custer 1/6th Scale – G.A. Custer represents the often known American military dichotomy. The officer, one of zeal and bravery and also reckless abandon. Our Custer statue brings forth both.



Masterworks Collection


New Jenkins November Releases!

November 12th, 2017

Gauls




Enemies of Rome

Aztec Empire – Conquest of America


The Aztec Empire flourished between c. 1345 and 1521 and, at its greatest extent, covered most of northern Mesoamerica. Aztec warriors were able to dominate their neighbouring states and permit rulers such as Motecuhzoma II to impose Aztec ideals and religion across Mexico. Highly accomplished in agriculture and trade, the last of the great Mesoamerican civilizations was also noted for its art and architecture which ranks amongst the finest ever produced on the continent.

The empire continued to expand from 1430 and the Aztec military – bolstered by conscription of all adult males, men supplied from allied and conquered states, and such elite groups as the Eagle and Jaguar warriors – swept aside their rivals. Aztec warriors wore padded cotton armour, carried a wooden or reed shield covered in hide, and wielded weapons such as a super sharp obsidian sword-club (macuahuitl), a spear or dart thrower (atlatl), and bow and arrows. Elite warriors also wore spectacular feathered and animal skin costumes and headdresses to signify their rank. Battles were concentrated in or around major cities and when these fell the victors claimed the whole surrounding territory. Regular tributes were extracted and captives were taken back to Tenochtitlan for ritual sacrifice. In this way the Aztec empire came to cover most of northern Mexico, an area of some 135,000 square kilometres.


The War suit, called an OCELOTOTEC, was woven to resemble an animal skin.

In the case of noblemen, this was made from feathers. Men of non-noble birth attaining the rank of Jaguar warrior, usually had to make do with suits made from actual skins. These usually had the clawed paws around the wrists and ankles.

Otherwise Jaguar War Suits came in a variety of colours, mainly blue , but also yellow , red and white.

In most armies uniforms are used to differentiate units. In the Aztec army uniforms served to differentiate men with different levels of military experience within the same unit.
Rank descriptions in uniforms between warriors depended on how many captives each individual hed taken. A soldier who succeded in capturing four of the enemy was awarded a Jaguar suit and helmet.
It was believed that to capture an enemy, honored their gods in a way far greater than killing enemy soldiers in the battlefield. For a warrior to kill an enemy was considered clumsy.
The captured prisoners were offered as a sacrifice to the Aztec gods.



Aztec Empire – Conquest of America

War of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Wheels Across The Desert



Egypt 1915

WWI- Gallipoli




Battle of Gallipoli 1915

WWI- British


A despatch rider (or dispatch) is a military messenger, mounted on horse or motorcycle (and occasionally in Egypt during World War I, on camels

Despatch riders were used by armed forces to deliver urgent orders and messages between headquarters and military units. They had a vital role at a time when telecommunications were limited and insecure. They were also used to deliver carrier pigeons.

In the British Army, motorcycle despatch riders were first used in the World War I by the Royal Engineers Signal Service. When the War Department called for motorcyclists to volunteer with their machines for despatch work at the start of August 1914, the response was huge.

The London office had 2000 more applicants than places, and a similar response was reported in regional centres around the country. If a rider and machine were approved then £10 was paid immediately, £5 to be paid on discharge (unless due to misconduct), and pay was 35s per week. The motor cycle would be taken over at valuation price, or would be replaced with a new one at the close of operations. Enlistment was for one year or as long as the war might last. The preference was for 500cc single cylinder machines and the horizontally-opposed twin cylinder. All machines had to have a “change speed gear”. A list of spare parts was also required to be carried.



British Forces

Flight Stands

There are now available 2 new flight stands.



Flight Stands For John Jenkins WWI Aircraft

WWII



JJ WWII Collection

German WWII


The Jagdpanther ( “hunting panther”) was a tank destroyer built by Nazi Germany during World War II based on the chassis of the Panther tank. It entered service in 1944 during the later stages of the war on the Eastern and Western Fronts. The Jagdpanther combined the 8.8 cm KwK 43 cannon of the Tiger II and the characteristically excellent armor and suspension of the Panther chassis

Mounting the deadly 8.8 cm PaK 43/3 L/71 cannon and protected by well-sloped 80 mm frontal armor, the Jagdpanther proved its worth as the most fearsome German tank destroyer of the war. Although too few were produced to affect the outcome of the war, the Jagdpanther represented an ideal blend of lethality, armor protection, and mobility that could destroy any allied tank with ease.

The GA-01(121) Jagdpanther is painted in a factory tri-camo pattern and features the choice of cannon barrel painted in factory heat resistant grey lacquer, or tri-camo.

During WW2, German tank cannon barrels were delivered to the tank factories and to combat units finished in both grey and Dunkelgelb (dark yellow) heat resistant lacquer.

While the Jagdpanther’s markings are historically accurate for numerous Jagdpanther units, this model is meant to represent a Jagdpanther from schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung 560 (Heavy Tank Destroyer Battalion 560). This German Heer (Army) unit was originally armed with Nashorn tank destroyers but converted to a mixed unit composed of one company of Jagdpanthers and two companies of Jagdpanzer IV L/70 tank destroyers in preparation for the Battle of the Bulge. It was attached to the 12. SS-Panzer Division “Hitlerjugend” and fought with this famous division in the final German offensives against the allies on both the West and East Fronts. First, against the Americans during the Battle of the Bulge and later in 1945 against the Russians during Operation Spring Awakening, the offensive near Lake Balaton in Hungary meant to relieve the siege of Budapest.

This model represents a late production Jagdpanther Ausf. G1 as produced by Mühlenbau und Industrie A.G (MIAG) in October 1944, and includes interior detail, removable schürzen side armor panels, and opening crew hatches, engine compartment, and a choice of Grey or Camouflaged gun Barrell.


JJ WWII Collection

Inter-War


A U.S. Navy Aircraftcarrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

A Landing Signal Officer (LSO) is a naval aviator with additional specialized training to better facilitate recovery operations on the ship. LSOs provide guidance for aircraft making approaches to the carrier. They monitor the approach and remain in contact with the pilot during the approach by hand signals.

Carrier approaches or ‘passes at the boat’, while analogous in technique to an approach to land at a terrestrial airport, require much more precision and have far less margin for error due to the landing area’s small size (75 x 600ft). And the requirement that the plane must impact the deck on speed and on angle of attack within a small area to snag an arrester wire and trap successfully makes this even more difficult.

The Navy has adopted this policy of the landing signal officer as well trained LSOs can quickly dissect problems with the approach and alert the pilot to correct prior to the pilot even becoming aware that there is a problem developing.

In the U.S. Navy, aircraft carrier operations began with USS Langley (CV-1) in 1922. Langleys initial flight operations were on an experimental basis to learn what worked and what didn’t. The first pilots had no signaling system for assistance from shipboard personnel. Langleys first executive officer, Kenneth Whiting, had a hand-cranked movie camera film every landing to aid in evaluation of landing technique. When not flying, Commander Whiting observed all landings from the aft port corner of the flight deck. Commander Whiting’s position remained visible to landing pilots in critical touchdown attitudes when the nose of the aircraft might obscure the pilot’s view straight ahead. Pilots found Commander Whiting’s body language helpful and suggested an experienced pilot be assigned to occupy that position, using agreed signals which evolved with experience. These Landing Signal Officers or Landing Safety Officers (LSOs) faced the incoming plane and held coloured flags for improved visibility. Because LSOs used coloured paddles, flags, or wands well into the jet age, the officers became unofficially known as “paddles” (US), or “batsmen” (UK). They are still referred thus to this day, and the LSO trade is referred to as “waving”.

Life on the flight deck is dangerous and taxing. Spinning propellers, grease everywhere, and a stiff sea wind that never stops are just a few of the things that must be endured for many hours at a time. The night and bad weather throw a whole other set of problems into the mix.

Yellow shirts are also worn by aircraft handlers and aircraft directors that shuttle aircraft around the carrier’s tight and chaotic deck.

Plane Handlers, who work under the direction of the yellow shirt wearing aircraft handlers, assist in moving aircraft around the deck. They also can operate the carrier’s massive aircraft elevators, drive tractors and work as messengers and verbal liaisons.



Inter-War Aviation Collection

Diorama Bases


A series of new diorama bases will now be available for pre-order over the next few months.

The first piece will now be available for pre-order. Please place your order by the end of NOVEMBER, and the diorama piece will be available to ship with the JANUARY 2018 releases.



John Jenkins Diorama Bases

New King & Country November Releases!

November 12th, 2017

King & Country November 2017 Releases!

2018 Calendar


The new KC 2018 Calendar. Available for free with King and Country purchases of $200.00 or more.



King & Country Calendar

Beginners Gift Sets


Three new gift sets, available for a limited time.



Beginner Gift Sets

NOTTINGHAM’S EVIL-DOERS IN ACTION


Although Robin Hood & His Merrie Men may rule the green-leafed glades of Sherwood Forest the dastardly Sherrif of Nottingham and his not-so-merry-men hold considerable sway elsewhere in the Country and Castle that dominates the town of Nottingham itself.
Two more fighting swordsmen and three additional Men-At-Arm’s prepare to join the Sherrif in searching and seeking out the elusive Robin as well as gathering in the taxes for the wicked and equally cruel Prince John…



Robin Hood

Napoleonics


  • NA405 Mounted Aide De Camp – The Emperor employed dozens of these dashing young officers to convey his instructions and orders all over the battlefield and beyond. They would also, on occasion, act as his personal ‘eyes and ears’ reporting on how well officers and
    regiments carried out the instructions and orders carried to them by these
    self-same ADC’s
  • NA410 The Hussar Hussie #1 Monique
    – From ancient times armies have always acquired female ‘camp followers’; women
    who accompanied their men into battle and fed them, tended their wounds,
    sometimes even carried their packs and equipment… as well as providing other
    ‘creature comforts.’ All for the sake of a little protection and safety in a
    distinctly violent and unsettled world. In Napoleonic times the practice
    continued and even increased as Napoleon and his Armies traversed the continent
    and beyond. Different regiments attracted different kinds of female companions.
    The Cavalry being among the smartest turned-out also tended to welcome some of
    the prettiest ladies…
  • NA411 Hussar Hussie #2 Sophie
    – Yet another fetching young lass, ‘Sophie’ is much enamoured with the officers
    of the 3rd Hussars… As they no doubt are with her!
  • NA399 The Old Guard At Rest
    – A standing Grenadier converses with his sitting, pipe-smoking comrade…
  • NA400 Guardsmen at-ease
    It’s fair to say that looking at these 2 x casually-posed Grenadiers on ‘Guard
    Duty’ the enemy must be far-away and certainly nowhere in the close vicinity.



Napoleonic

THE U.S. ARMY AT WAR 1944/45


Now, they’re taking the war into the very heart of the Third Reich with this latest batch of “Fighting GI’s”…
Decked-out in the Olive Green M1943 field jacket these newest ‘Dogfaces’ come in a range of useful battlefield poses reflecting the reality of street fighting in Nazi Germany in the closing months of WW2.
Here is the first group of 5 X GI’s to be released…

  • DD307 Charging Rifleman – As his buddies provide ‘covering fire’ this GI runs forward from one firing position to the next.
  • DD308 Snap Shooter – This next GI is warily moving forward holding his M1 Garand in the ‘ready’ position in case a sudden ‘target of opportunity’ presents itself. Very much a ‘hunting’ pose.
  • DD311 Machine Gun Team – The .30 cal. machine gun was usually not part of the regular rifle platoon weapons list… They were attached to battalions and companies who would then supply them to platoons whenever or wherever it was deemed necessary.
    Our 2-man team would provide a volume of suppressing fire that would allow the riflemen to position themselves best for an attack on the enemy.
  • DD313 Turnning Bar Gunner – The standard U.S. Army Squad Light Machine Gun was the M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle (the B.A.R.). It used a twenty-round box magazine and performed in a similar squad support role as the British Bren. Our BAR Gunner appears to be looking around a corner to get a better view of the enemy.



D-Day ’44

“THE RATS OF TOBRUK”


This nickname was given in particular by Field Marshal Erwin Rommel to the ‘Diggers’ of the 9th Australian Division (plus one brigade of the 7th) as well as other British, Polish and Indian units defending the besieged Libyan port city of Tobruk.

The siege began in April 1941 and lasted until almost December of that same year.

‘ORIGINS OF THE NAME’

The mainly Australian garrison was extremely adept at utilizing captured enemy equipment and would go out of their way, after every enemy assault, to go forward into the battlefield at night to recover as much as they could that might be reusable.

At the same time the Tobruk defenders dug an extensive network of tunnels and shelters to supplement their trenches… and used them frequently when under heavy bombardment.

‘Lord Haw-Haw’, the British traitor and German propagandist took up Rommel’s description dismissing the garrison as ‘the miserable desert rats of Tobruk’…

The defenders thereafter adopted the title with pride!!!

  • EA124 Trench & Riflemen – Two Australian ’Diggers’ watch over their sand-bagged trench .303 Lee Enfield rifles at the ready.
  • EA125 Trench & Bren Gun Team – As one Aussie scans the horizon for any sign of enemy activity his mate ‘mans’ the trusty Bren Light Machine Gun.
  • EA126 Trench & BOYS Anti-Tank Rifle – One more Australian infantryman together with his ‘BOYS Anti Tank Rifle’ takes aim at an approaching enemy vehicle.
    Although adequate against light tanks and armoured cars in the early part of the war the ‘BOYS’ was ineffective against heavier armour. It was phased out by mid war… but still in use at the time of Tobruk.
  • EA127 Defense Under Fire – Three lying-prone Aussies taking cover from enemy artillery and mortar fire.
  • EA128 Kneeling Rifleman – One more very useful Australian infantryman with his .303 Lee Enfield.



Montgomery’s 8th Army

ACHTUNG TIGER


There’s not a lot to say about the PzKpfw VI, better known as “The Tiger”, that has not been said before… It is, quite simply, the most famous German tank of World War Two… Perhaps, the most famous tank ever and certainly the most popular and the most collected!!!

Given its ‘TIGER’ nickname by its designer Ferdinand Porsche it has been called ‘The most outstanding tank design of its time.’ That it most definitely was BUT it also had some mighty faults… It was over-engineered… it required considerably greater resources of materials and manpower to manufacture it and… its fuel consumption was staggering (at a time when German fuel production was actually dramatically decreasing).

Its heavy armour and mighty ’88 gun were indeed impressive… and did terrify its enemies both on the Eastern and Western Fronts… But its manufacturing cost and its requirement for specially-trained crews meant that it never had the full impact on the Allies that it might have had. Just 1,347 Tigers were actually built between August 1942 and August 1944. After that time production of the Tiger I was phased out in favour of the Tiger II, better known as the ‘King Tiger’.

That all being said its fighting reputation among its opponents spread far and wide and led, in some cases, to almost panic whenever it appeared on the battlefield.

By far the most famous commander and promoter of the ‘Tiger’ legend was a young Waffen SS officer called… Michael Wittmann.

By the winter of 1943, Michael Wittmann had already acquired plenty of battlefield experience with the relatively new Pz. Kpfw. VI “TIGER”.

During the Battle of KURSK in early July, 1943 the young platoon leader had destroyed dozens of Soviet tanks, self-propelled guns and even artillery pieces… He also survived a collision with a burning Red Army tank!

By the Fall and Winter of 1943 he continued to add numerous ‘Kills’ to his tally and was recognized for his achievements by the ‘Top Brass’ with awards and presentations.

One particular ‘presentation’ was special that was when Wittmann and his crew were to meet Jochen Peiper, another noted and popular Waffen SS officer.

For Josef Goebel’s Propaganda Ministry this was a major event to be recorded for posterity… Two Nazi Heroes for the price of one!

These new releases capture the moment…

  • WS344 Wittmann’s Winter Tiger – Although the Tiger’s ‘Winter Whitewash’ is beginning to wear-off the tank stands in all its glory…
    As a ‘Command Tank’, the model sports 3 x Radio Antennas, and 2 x top turret hatches that open and close allowing collectors, if they wish, to place figures in the ‘open’ position or have everything ‘bolted down’ for battle.
    The main gun also elevates and depresses as required. Interestingly, although the tank itself has a battle-worn appearance the ‘kill’ markings on the 88mm gun are brand-new. This was because, for propaganda purposes, it made for a better picture to ‘show the folks back home’ just how successful Michael Wittmann and his crew had been.
    In reality, tank commanders would not have wished to draw even more enemy attention to themselves, their crew and vehicle with such an ostentatious and obvious display.
  • WS345 When Wittman met Peiper – This SIX-FIGURE set portrays the moment when Jochen Peiper, also in black tank uniform, greets the junior officer Michael Wittmann and his crew.
    As you see Peiper gives the almost-casual half ‘Heil Hitler’ salute while the younger Wittmann gives the full, extended right arm salute in reply. Wittmann’s Crew stand-at-attention waiting to be introduced.
  • WS-S01 Wittmann Special Presentation
    Gift Set
    – This combined SET brings together the “WINTER TIGER” and the FULL Six-Figure parade set at a very attractive and affordable combined package price.



Russian Front Winter 1941

Streets of Old Hong Kong


Two hard-working ‘Coolies’ (labourers) enjoy a well-earned rest from their labours and tuck into some simple but nourishing soup and vegetables.


Orient

CHRISTMAS COMES BUT ONCE A YEAR


Someone, somewhere is dreaming of a White Christmas and this GI has decided to brighten up the drab wartime Yule Tide with a visit to a local orphanage!

Using typical ‘GI ingenuity’ this soldier has found an old Santa / St. Nick costume, ‘borrowed’ a military motorcycle and side car and loaded it up with whatever toys and gifts he and his fellow GI’S could find. They’ve even donated a whole case of a popular, well-known American drink that these kids have never tasted before.

This will be one wartime Christmas they will never forget!



Christmas – Limited Edition


New First Legion October Releases!

October 15th, 2017

Retreat from Russia


We are extremely pleased to present a wonderful expansion to our Retreat from Russia Series and by far our largest “Vignette”, the Burning of the Eagles! On the late afternoon of November 28th, facing the grim reality of the situation in which the tattered remnant of the Grand Armee found itself, Napoleon ordered the burning of his papers and many of the army’s standards to prevent them from falling into enemy hands. Now, it is very much debated whether or not the standards were actually burned, however, the subject makes for such a wonderful vignette that we felt it was a must add to the series. The Berezina is a battle in particular where Napoleon’s old energy returned to him and the escape of the French Army from a seemingly impossible situation was nothing short of miraculous. We have presented the scene here as inspired by several paintings of the same topic, most notably that by Wojciech Kossak (1857-1942).



Retreat From Russia

Battle of Normandy




Battle of Normandy

Unpainted Metal Kits




Unpainted Metal Kits – Scale 60mm and 75mm

King & Country October 2017 Releases!

October 15th, 2017

AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE


This coming 31st October 2017 marks the centenary of the epic charge of the Australian Light Horse to capture the town and water wells of BEERSHEBA in what was then Palestine but is now part of modern-day Israel.

The Australian horsemen, against fierce Turkish opposition, charged the enemy’s lines and frontline trenches scattering their opponents and then galloping on into the town itself to capture the all-important water wells. It proved to be one of the major turning points of the War in the Desert during WW1.

  • AL090 The Morning Snack – Light Horseman were tremendously attached to their horses called Australian Walers, a breed of horse developed in Australia from horses that were brought over from Britain and Ireland in the 19th Century.
    A ‘special’ bond developed between horse and rider that was unique. At the end of the war, however when the Australian horsemen were to be returned to Australia the decision was made to leave their horses behind and for them to be either euthanized or sold off to the local Arabs. Many horsemen themselves preferred to shoot their own mount before leaving it to a far worse fate.
    But in this happier scene a young trooper is feeding his animal an apple as he awaits orders to ‘mount-up’.
  • AL091 The Fond Farewell – A dismounted NCO (non commissioned officer) takes a young nurse into his arms… He is leaving for parts unknown and this maybe their last chance to meet for some time. Are they lovers… or perhaps an older brother and younger sister…? Whichever it is… it makes for a poignant scene.
  • AL092 Skippy the Mascot & His Handler – From time immemorial soldiers and armies have had animal mascots… In Egypt and Palestine, during the First World War, the Australian Light Horse had a kangaroo called “Skippy” as one of their divisional mascots.
    Here, we see him with his personal “handler” having a polite conversation…
  • AL093 Light Horse Bugler – Back a hundred years ago bugle calls ‘ruled’ a soldier’s life from ‘reveille’ first thing in the morning till “lights-out” last thing at night!
    Almost every duty or task a soldier might be ordered to do would and could be announced by the sound of a bugle call. Here is the camp bugler doing what buglers do!

AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE ‘SECOND EDITION’


In December 2009, King & Country launched our very first Australian Light Horse figures to an unsuspecting collecting audience around the world.

We were modestly confident that we would ‘find’ a market for these mounted figures in Australia itself BUT were not so sure about the rest of the collecting world…

Now, eight years later, I am happy to report that the ALH series (Australian Light Horse) has its devoted admirers and collectors all over the globe… and not just in the ‘Land Down Under’! Some of our biggest and most enthusiastic collectors of ALH are in countries as diverse and far apart as Russia… Indonesia… Japan… and the Czech Republic to name but a few.

Not only that but a steady stream of new ALH collectors keep arriving in part, of course, thanks to the hard work and efforts of our three dedicated Aussie Dealers in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne.

As ‘newbies’ arrive they often seek out some of the original, older pieces now long since retired as well as the more current production.

MARKING THE CENTENARY…

To help celebrate the hundred years since the Light Horse’s remarkable charge at Beersheba K&C are issuing a ‘Second Edition’ of 7 the earliest and most popular first releases of ALH with one noticeable change… the horse colours of the individual mounts. This is to ensure that collectors owning the original pieces will know and recognize a ‘First Edition’ piece or … this newer ‘Second Edition’ horse and rider at a glance.

It also allows newer collectors of the series to obtain those extremely useful earlier pieces without having to pay higher costs on the ‘secondary’ market.

Here are the four amended mounted ‘Second Editions’:

  • AL094 Australian Light Horse Officer w/Pistol – Charging to the front, service revolver held firmly in the air.
  • AL095 Australian Light Horse Bugler – – Lee Enfield .303 slung across his back this bugler sounds the ‘charge’!
  • AL096 Australian Light Horse Trooper w/Rifle – Holding his .303 in his left hand this trooper charges forward.
  • AL097 Australian Light Horse Trooper Charging w/Bayonet – The ‘classic’ iconic image of the Light horseman at Beersheba… sword bayonet held forward to the front as horse and rider gallop towards glory!
  • AL098 Turkish Officer with Flag – A very, very popular figure when released BUT had a bad tendency to fall over due to the heavy all-metal Turkish flag!!! Now, the flag is sturdy, light-weight polyresin and the ‘problem’ is a thing of the past. Also, we have repainted the officer with a brand-new Turkish officer’s uniform… Very smart and, I think, better than the original!
  • AL099 Standing Horse #1 – Both of these ‘retired’ empty horses have been much requested by both dealers and collectors because of the number of ALH dismounted figures currently available to make up camp scenes… Obviously if you have dismounted troopers sitting and standing around you must have their unmounted horses nearby.
  • AL100 Standing Horse #2



Australian Light Horse

Invasion of Malaya


Although the Japanese troops that invaded Malaya in December 1941 were outnumbered 2-1 by their British and Empire opponents they were fast-moving and surprisingly innovative… Among the many ways they constantly outflanked and out-paced their opposition was by the use of captured and abandoned functioning military vehicles left behind by the retreating British and Empire troops… and many thousands of bicycles commandeered from the native population and/or hundreds of others strategically left by Japanese merchants along the main roads and routes in the days, weeks and months prior to the outbreak of war.
Here are just a few examples…

  • JN043 Japanese Soldier Carrying His Bicycle – Hard and brutal campaigning was no stranger to the average Japanese soldier in Malaya. Most of them were veterans of the China War and were tough, battle-hardened and resourceful.
  • JN044 Japanese Riding Their Bicycles– TWO of those Army cyclists peddling along as fast as they can go to get closer and closer to their ultimate goal… ‘SINGAPORE’!



Invasion of Malaya

Saving Private Ryan


“SAVING PRIVATE RYAN” is quite simply one of the finest war films ever made. Directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks and Matt Damon it tells the story of a squad of U.S. Army Rangers tasked with finding and bringing back safely the last surviving brother (of four) who is somewhere in Normandy during the days after the D.Day Invasion of June 1944.

Next year marks the 20th Anniversary of the release of this fine motion picture. As a tribute to the men who made ‘SAVING PRIVATE RYAN’ and the real heroes who inspired it K&C are producing no less than TWO sets of the 8-man squad that went searching for PFC James F. Ryan of the 101st Airborne behind the German lines… The first set, is currently available and now we have…



Gang of Heroes

SOMEWHERE ON THE GOLAN HEIGHTS


For many years Syria had fortified and built up their defenses on these heights over-looking the northern flank of Israel. During this time the Syrians had almost constantly shelled Israeli kibbutzes and communities from this elevated position.

When war broke out Israel was determined to capture it and safeguard its northern border from these Syrian attacks.

On the morning of June 9, 1967, three days after the war had begun, Israel attacked. First with sustained air strikes and then with infantry, artillery and armour including their elite paratroopers. The fighting was hard and bloody… but ultimately successful.

Here are 3 more important additions to our new ‘SIX-DAY WAR’ series…

SPECIAL NOTE: A special ‘stand-alone’ figure of PFC James F. Ryan is already in development.

  • IDF011 Prisoner & Escort – An Israeli Para pushes his Syrian prisoner towards the P.O.W. ‘Cage’. On the Para’s back is the Syrian’s AK47 Assault Rifle. The Israeli himself is armed with the ubiquitous ‘UZI’.
  • IDF015 Israeli Para… Pointing – Belgian-made FN rifle held aloft this other Para is indicating in which direction ‘Prisoner & Escort’ should go.
  • IDF017 Israeli M38 Jeep with 106mm Recoilless Rifle – This U.S. made, 1950’s vintage M38 Jeep was very much in evidence in the IDF’s military inventory during and after the ’67 War.
    Our set includes the driver and vehicle commander together with an extra ‘UZI’ for protection. The main vehicle protection however is the jeep-mounted GPMG (General Purpose Machine Gun) sighted in front of the vehicle passenger position. All in … a great-looking set and a worthy and useful addition to this ‘young’ collection…


Six Day War

Tota Tora!


Note: Only 150 of this “Imperial Japanese Navy A6M ‘Zero’” are being released.

  • JN046 Imperial Japanese Navy A6M “Zero” (Just 150 of this aircraft are being released) – K&C’s first THREE Naval A6M ‘Zeroes’ are long sold out but still we have collectors who ‘want’ that pale grey, black nose ‘classic’ naval aircraft.
    This fourth IJN ‘Zero’ belongs to the IJN Carrier Zuikaku, flown by Petty Officer 1st Class Tetsuzo Iwamoto, as part of the Combat Air Patrol over the Task Force during the Pearl Harbor operation. Petty Officer 1st Class Iwamoto already had fourteen ‘kills’ claimed over China by 7 December 1941 and was ultimately credited with eighty victories by the end of World War Two and flew on ‘Combat Air Patrol’ above the Japanese Fleet as it released all of its attack aircraft on an unsuspecting Pearl Harbor on that fateful morning of 7 December, 1941.
  • JN-S01 Pre Flight Walkaround – Before every flight each pilot performs a 360 degree inspection of his aircraft.
  • JN-S02 Armorers & Mechanics – Each aircraft had its own designated team of armorers under the supervision of a petty officer mechanic.



Tora!Tora!Tora!

Tarawa


  • USMC018 Marine Reloading – A lying ‘Leatherneck’ holds a fresh clip of 8 rounds in his hand as he prepares to reload his M1.
  • USMC020 Crouching Marine Firing Rifle – Staying low to make a smaller target (hopefully) this Marine fires off a few rounds from his M1 ‘Garand’ rifle.
  • USMC022 Kneeling Marine Tommy Gunner – The Thompson Sub Machine Gun was the favored weapon of senior NCO’S (non commissioned officers) and some junior officers… Strong, sturdy, unlikely to jam it had real ‘stopping-power’.



Battle of TARAWA

Rome




Romans

STREETS OF OLD HONG KONG



Orient

STREETS OF OLD BERLIN!

These typical ‘Berlin Poster Drum Columns’ were a familiar sight in the Reich’s capital city… Our first version covered the 1930’s and the Rise of the Third Reich… This new Drum Column reflects a much grimmer, less optimistic outlook typical of the latter days of the war.



Berlin’38 Leibstandarte

CHRISTMAS COMES BUT ONCE A YEAR…




Christmas – Limited Edition

New Britain’s Fall 2017 Catalog – Expected in 2018!

October 15th, 2017

American Civil War


New Britain”s 2017 Fall Releases – Expected Availability 2018!


American Civil War

Clash of Empires



Clash of Empires

Museum Collection




Museum Collection

WWII Collection




WWII Collection

Zulu Wars




Rorke’s Drift – Matte Version

New John Jenkins October Releases!

October 5th, 2017

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE


No. 457 Squadron was a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fighter squadron of World War II. Equipped with Supermarine Spitfire fighters, it was formed in England during June 1941 under Article XV of the Empire Air Training Scheme. The squadron was transferred to Australia in June 1942 and saw combat in the South West Pacific Area before being disbanded in November 1945.

These new WW2 planes have been designed with interchangeable “plug-in” undercarriages.

This will enable those collectors who wish to display their Second World War models on display stands, to display them with the undercarriage correctly closed.

The models will also have opening and closing canopies.

The side door will open only on specific models, marked with the code “D”. Since the hinge is oversize, if the model is displayed with the door closed this may not be acceptable.


The squadron saw combat against both Nazi Germany and the Empire of Japan during the war. From March to May 1942 it was based in southern England and flew missions over German-occupied France during which it shot down at least five Luftwaffe aircraft. After being deployed to Australia, No. 457 Squadron was based near Darwin as part of No. 1 Wing RAAF and intercepted several Japanese raids on Allied bases in northern Australia between March and November 1943. The squadron remained at Darwin and saw almost no combat during 1944, but moved to Morotai and later Labuan in 1945 from where it attacked Japanese positions in the Netherlands East Indies and Borneo as part of Allied offensives in these areas.

No. 457 Squadron flew its first operations from Morotai on 10 February. The squadron’s main roles in this period were to conduct ground attack missions against Japanese camps and shipping as well as escorting other aircraft engaged in attacking these targets. This involved a heavy workload, and the squadron flew over 293 operational sorties between February and the end of April. From May No. 457 Squadron’s Spitfires began using dive bombing tactics as well as strafing targets with their guns.
No. 457 Squadron participated in the Borneo Campaign during the final months of the war. On 27 May it was ordered to prepare for deployment, and on 5 June its personnel and equipment sailed for Labuan island off the north-west coast of Borneo

Please note that one more Spitfire MK VIII for the RAAF at Moratai, will be available later next year, as well as more ground crew and pilots.


Robert Henry Maxwell (Bobby) Gibbes, DSO, DFC & Bar, OAM (6 May 1916 – 11 April 2007) was a leading Australian fighter ace of World War II, and the longest-serving wartime commanding officer of No. 3 Squadron RAAF. He was officially credited with 10¼ aerial victories, although his score is often reported as 12, including two shared. Gibbes was also credited with five aircraft probably destroyed, and a further 16 damaged. He commanded No. 3 Squadron in North Africa from February 1942 to April 1943, apart from a brief period when he was injured.

Born in rural New South Wales, Gibbes worked as a jackaroo and salesman before joining the Royal Australian Air Force in February 1940. Posted to the Middle East in April 1941, he flew with No. 3 Squadron in the Syria–Lebanon Campaign, and became commanding officer during the Western Desert Campaign, where his leadership and fighting skills earned him the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Flying Cross and Bar. Subsequently posted to the South West Pacific, he served with No. 80 Wing of the Australian First Tactical Air Force, and took part in the “Morotai Mutiny” of April 1945. After the war he spent many years in New Guinea developing local industry, for which he was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 2004. He continued to fly until the age of 85, and died five years later in 2007.


JJ WWII Collection

WWI – BRITISH


The importance of motorbikes during the Great War is all too often overlooked. Motorbikes were used for mounted infantry, scouts, dispatch and courier duties, ammunition carriers, medical supply carriers and casualty evacuation. The versatility of these machines clearly helped them play a hugely significant role in the logistics of the war, far more than the automobile.

The use that they were most commonly used for was that of the messenger. Because of the unreliability of communications technology during the war years, the motorbike’s virtue of speed meant that orders, reports and maps could be transferred between units quickly.

It was not only the men who got to ride around on motorbikes. The Women’s Royal Flying Corps made extensive use of motorbikes. The initial aim of the WRAF was to provide female mechanics so that men could be free to serve in the armed forces. Thanks to the high number of women volunteers, many also filled driver positions as well.

Douglas was a British motorcycle manufacturer from 1907–1957 based in Kingswood, Bristol, owned by the Douglas family, and especially known for its horizontally opposed twin cylinder engined bikes and as manufacturers of speedway machines. The company also built a range of cars between 1913 and 1922.

During WW1 some 70,000 of these 349cc twin horizontal cylinder machines were produced for the British military.



British Forces

FRENCH MILITIA



French Militia 1759

THE SOUTH CAROLINA PROVINCIAL REGIMENT



Provincial Regiments 1759

WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

John Jenkins Sneak Peak from the Chicago Show 2017!

September 30th, 2017

VOUGHT F4U CORSAIR


On display in the Treefrog Treasures room, under the guidance of Tom Dubel, was the prototype of the iconic second world war carrier fighter, the Vought F4U Corsair.

The Vought F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War 2 and the Korean War.

The Corsair was designed as a carrier based aircraft. Initially its difficulty in landing on carriers, rendered it unsuitable for Navy use until the Royal Navy overcame the landing issues.

After the carrier landing issues had been tackled, it quickly became the most capable carrier based fighter bomber of the Second World War.

The jjDesigns Corsair, can be displayed with wings down, and sitting on two of the jjD BH aircraft carrier decks.

The Undercarriage for the Corsair is interchangeable, and the model can be displayed on any of the jjD Flight Stands.

The wings can also be plugged into the raised position.

This with a single jjD Aircraft carrier base, allows for those with limited space to display their Corsair on a standard shelf unit.

The first Corsair will be available in 2018.

There will be another iconic US carrier plane released early next year, before the Corsair.

LITTLE JULIE II


Captive-taking by Native Americans was surprisingly common in Colonial times. It was also common for captives to choose their Native communities over their Colonial families.

This puzzled the European Americans.They came to America believing that conversion would be easy once Natives saw the superiority of the Europeans’ religion, clothing, agriculture, dwellings, and every comfort known so far to man.

Yet there were very few Indians who converted to English culture, while large numbers of English chose to become Indian. Even Benjamin Franklin pondered, “When an Indian child has been brought up among us, taught our language and habituated to our customs, yet if he goes to see his relations and makes one Indian ramble with them, there is no persuading him ever to return. [But] when white persons of either sex have been taken prisoners young by the Indians, and lived a while among them, tho’ ransomed by their friends, and treated with all imaginable tenderness to prevail with them to stay among the English, yet in a short time they become disgusted with our manner of life, and the care and pains that are necessary to support it, and take the first good opportunity of escaping again into the woods, from whence there is no reclaiming them.”

Amongst the many who were captured was Mary Jemison.

Mary Jemison was born on the ship that brought her Irish parents, brothers and sisters to America in 1743. A few years later her family moved from Philadelphia to a homestead on the Pennsylvania frontier. The family toiled on the edge of civilization transforming the wilderness to cultivated soil. Each new day brought with it the fear of attack by wild beast or hostile indian.

Those fears became a reality on the morning of a spring day in 1758. The British colonies were engulfed in a war against the French. On that spring morning in 1758 a small raiding party made up of French and Indians swooped down on the frontier settlement capturing a number of British colonists including Mary Jemison and most of her family. From that day until her death 78 years later, she was never to leave the Indian culture. Her story of her capture and life amongst the Seneca was first published in 1824.

THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA


A new series from jjDesigns, was previewed at the Sierra Toy Soldier room, at the Chicago Toy Soldier Show 2017.

The Aztec Empire flourished between c. 1345 and 1521 and, at its greatest extent, covered most of northern Mesoamerica. Aztec warriors were able to dominate their neighbouring states and permit rulers such as Motecuhzoma II to impose Aztec ideals and religion across Mexico. Highly accomplished in agriculture and trade, the last of the great Mesoamerican civilizations was also noted for its art and architecture which ranks amongst the finest ever produced on the continent.

The empire continued to expand from 1430 and the Aztec military – bolstered by conscription of all adult males, men supplied from allied and conquered states, and such elite groups as the Eagle and Jaguar warriors – swept aside their rivals. Aztec warriors wore padded cotton armour, carried a wooden or reed shield covered in hide, and wielded weapons such as a super sharp obsidian sword-club (macuahuitl), a spear or dart thrower (atlatl), and bow and arrows. Elite warriors also wore spectacular feathered and animal skin costumes and headdresses to signify their rank. Battles were concentrated in or around major cities and when these fell the victors claimed the whole surrounding territory. Regular tributes were extracted and captives were taken back to Tenochtitlan for ritual sacrifice. In this way the Aztec empire came to cover most of northern Mexico, an area of some 135,000 square kilometres.

The first of the Aztec figures will be available in December.

Please note the first of the Conquistadores will be previewed at the December London Toy Soldier show.


DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK


Another new jjDesigns series for 2018, will move the eighteenth century work towards the American Revolution with the “Drums Along The Mohawk” series. Will be available early 2018.

Primarily based on the book of Walter D. Edmonds who wrote about the area of upstate New York, and detailed the lives of pioneer farmers along the Mohawk River during the American Revolution.

Edmonds also wrote “The Matchlock Gun,” which was about a 10-year-old boy defending his home against Indians in colonial New York, and won the Newbery Medal for Children’s Literature in 1942. He also wrote about four women captives of Indians in 1778 in his 1947 book “In the Hands of the Senecas,” Edmonds’ books are considered the richest body of fiction about the time and region since the works of James Fenimore Cooper.

The series will also attempt to cover probably the most significant battle of the American Revolution.

The two Battles of Saratoga were a turning point in the American Revolution. On September 19th, British General John Burgoyne achieved a small, but costly victory over American forces led by Horatio Gates and Benedict Arnold. Though his troop strength had been weakened, Burgoyne again attacked the Americans at Bemis Heights on October 7th, but this time was defeated and forced to retreat. He surrendered ten days later, and the American victory convinced the French government to formally recognize the colonist’s cause and enter the war as their ally.

THE GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN


Turkish figures for the Gallipoli series. This included a two man machine gun team, an officer, as well as a Turkish sniper. The first of these sets should be available in the next few months.

Billy Sing was an elite sniper from Australia and his “duel” with his opposite number from Turkey called Abdul the Terrible, became the basis of Ion Idriess book “Lurking Death; The Stories of Snipers in Gallipoli, Sinai and Palestine”.

“Abdul the Sniper was the pride of the Turkish Army. They named his rifle ‘The Mother of Death’. Because, so declared the Ottoman Guard, ‘her breech gives birth to bullets which destroy the lives of men’,” Idriess wrote. One of the Turkish snipers victims was Private John Simpson Kirkpatrick, “the man with the donkey”. A party of “counter-snipers” led by Lieutenant Thomas Grace, Wellington Battalion NZEF, were briefed to take on the Turkish marksmen. Each sharpshooter had an observer or spotter with a telescope.

An equally terrible Australian sniper emerged who day by day killed man after man. The Australian sniper was trooper Billy Sing from Queensland of the 5th Light Horse. Abdul the Terrible was ordered to locate and kill him.
Idriess says he was one day acting as a spotter for Sing. He writes: “How many enemy this particular sniper shot will never be known but in three months his tally was one hundred and fifty.”
Adbul the Terrible would apparently examine any man who was shot through the head to try to establish the trajectory of the bullet and the likely location of the sniper from whom it was fired. His calculations led him to believe the shots were coming from one spot nearly on top of a trench across on Chatham’s Post.At night Abdul began to dig his cunning fox hole into which he would climb before dawn to lay there all day, staring across at Chatham’s Post.

As Idriess tells it, Abdul ignored other tempting targets but for a long time could not locate Sing, until one evening he reported to the officer in charge. “I have found him. I will kill him tomorrow.”
The next day, according to the account, another Anzac climbed into Sing’s hideout or “possy” but instinct apparently told Abdul this wasn’t the real man he was after and he, accordingly, withheld his fire.
Then Sing got into the possy and his observer suddenly alerted him not to open the loophole. Sing looked through the telescope. “Thus the Australian sniper stared into Abdul the Terrible’s eyes,” according to the text.

What happened next can only be left to Idriess

“The sniper, with his finger, slid back the loophole cover hardly an inch, then cautiously poked his rifle muzzle through…
“Careful,” murmured the observer. “He’s got the eyes of an eagle and – he’s staring straight here.” “It’s me or him,” grunted Sing.

“But had Abdul fired, even had his bullet come through that tiny slit, it wouldn’t have hit the sniper, for the born sniper knows the crouch that means the fractional difference between life and death. Only when the sniper actually had his eye aligned with his rifle sights then –

“That was what Abdul was waiting for. His big eyes staring, his rifle-muzzle slowly rising up… But Abdul did not know that the Australian sniper had seen him.

“Gently the peephole widened, then stopped close around the rifle. Abdul waited with finger on trigger, just awaiting that loophole to open the least fraction more. And – a bullet took him between the eyes.”

The Australian War Memorial states that the Turkish army immediately retaliated, aiming its heavy artillery at Billy’s hiding position and completely destroying it. Fortunately for the Australian sniper and his spotter, they had already evacuated to their unit trenches.

Great War


The Great War “Biker Girl”, will be available in October.

The importance of motorbikes during the Great War is all too often overlooked. Motorbikes were used for mounted infantry, scouts, dispatch and courier duties, ammunition carriers, medical supply carriers and casualty evacuation. The versatility of these machines clearly helped them play a hugely significant role in the logistics of the war, far more than the automobile.

The use that they were most commonly used for was that of the messenger. Because of the unreliability of communications technology during the war years, the motorbike’s virtue of speed meant that orders, reports and maps could be transferred between units quickly.
It was not only the men who got to ride around on motorbikes. The Women’s Royal Air Force (WRAF) made extensive use of motorbikes. The initial aim of the WRAF was to provide female mechanics so that men could be free to serve in the armed forces. Thanks to the high number of women volunteers, many also filled driver positions as well.

ARMIES AND ENEMIES OF ANCIENT ROME – SPARTACUS


Spartacus was a Thracian gladiator. Little is known about his life before he became one of the slave leaders in the Third Servile War, which was the slave uprising war against the Roman Republic.

Spartacus may have served in the Roman army, and it is generally believed he deserted, and led bandit raids. It is known he was captured and sold into slavery.
In 73 BC he escaped from a gladiatorial training school at Capua along with about 70 other gladiators. Taking refuge on Mount Vesuvius, along with other runaway slaves who the gladiators trained in rudimentary combat skills.
Spartacus it is believed became one of several leaders of the Gladiators’ revolt, along with two Gauls, Crixus and Oenamus.

Initially Rome did not regard the slave army as a serious force and did not send first line troops against it. Spartacus’ army outmaneuvered and defeated the first four forces it confronted, which led to more slaves joining the rebellion, and at its peak the army was believed to have been 90,000-120,000 strong.

Spartacus advocated crossing the Alps to put distance between the army and Rome and find freedom. One of the leaders, Crixus wanted to attack Rome itself where large numbers of slaves would also join them. This led to Crixus and 30,000 men leaving the main army to raid the countryside, who were eventually defeated and killed.

Spartacus won 3 more engagements and then for unknown reasons turned south instead of crossing the Alps, which threw Rome into a panic. A new Roman force under a competent commander named Marcus Crassus was sent to deal with the rebellious slave army, and after a long period of pursuit and a few engagements, the slave army was defeated near the headwaters of the Siler River in southern Italy.

Spartacus was killed, but his body was never found. The Romans crucified 6,000 rebellious slaves as a warning to others.

The story of Spartacus has served as inspiration for books, movies and tv series. He has often been made into a symbol for oppressed people rebelling to overturn their society, although he actually never attempted to overthrow Roman society, but just tried to lead his army to safety and freedom.

The Spartacus figure and more enemies of Rome will be available in 2018.

ROMAN FORT AND SIEGE DEFENCES


The first three prototype pieces of the Roman/Barbarian fort.

The Battle of Alesia or Siege of Alesia was a military engagement in the Gallic Wars that took place in September, 52 BC, around the Gallic oppidum (fortified settlement) of Alesia, a major centre of the Mandubii tribe. It was fought by the army of Julius Caesar against a confederation of Gallic tribes united under the leadership of Vercingetorix of the Arverni. It was the last major engagement between Gauls and Romans, and is considered one of Caesar’s greatest military achievements and a classic example of siege warfare and investment. The battle of Alesia marked the end of Gallic independence in France and Belgium.

In AD 60, the ICENI of East Anglia who were led by the legendary Boudica, rebelled against Roman rule, and were defeated in a battle fought it is believed somewhere in the midlands.
As a result of the rebellion the Romans built a series of fortifications in the area, which included Fort Lunt, near Coventry.

The Fort Lunt was built around AD60 to act as a supply depot and headquarters for the Roman Army during the final campaign against Boudica.
The Gateway has been inspired by the reconstructed Roman Gateway at Fort Lunt.

Alesia was an oppidum (fortified settlement) on a lofty hill, with two rivers on two different sides. Due to such strong defensive features, Caesar decided on a siege to force surrender by starvation. Considering that about 80,000 men were garrisoned in Alesia, together with the local civilian population, this would not have taken long.

To guarantee a perfect blockade, Caesar ordered the construction of an encircling set of fortifications, a circumvallation, around Alesia. It was eleven Roman miles long (16 km, each mile equivalent to around 1,000 left-foot steps, meaning one stepped with their right, then left) and had 24 redoubts (towers). While work was in progress, the Gauls carried out cavalry sallies to disrupt the construction. Caesar placed the legions in front of the camp in case of a sally by the infantry and got his Germanic allies to pursue the Gallic cavalry

Straight sections and corner sections will be available to produce a complete fort, or a suitable circumvallation defensive perimeter.

The jjDesigns Roman Fort will provide the perfect backdrop to either a Boudica Rebellion, or a Siege of Alesia display.

The Roman fort will be available early in 2018.