New John Jenkins April Releases!

March 21st, 2019

ROMAN, PONTOON BRIDGE

Roman-designed pontoon bridges, constructed mostly during wartime for the shock and awe of quick raids, and were a specialty of Julius Caesar’s.

In 55 B.C., he built a pontoon bridge that was around 437 yards (400 meters) long to cross the Rhine river, which was traditionally thought by the Germanic tribes to be safely out of reach of Roman power.

Roman leader Caligula is well-known for his brief stint as the emperor of Rome, from 37 AD through 41 AD. Some say that Caligula displayed signs of madness during his reign. According to historical accounts, one of these displays of madness was Caligula’s demand for the construction of a floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae so that he could ride triumphantly across it. Some historians dispute the building of this bridge. With differing accounts of exactly what happened during Caligula’s reign as emperor, we may never know whether the floating bridge of Baiae was actually constructed, but it remains a lasting story of power, madness, and what happens when the two intertwine.

Please note this is for sale on a pre order basis only. Pre Order period ends March 31st, 2019. Do not miss out.

Roman Pontoon Bridge

Iceni Warrior

Enemies of Rome

Roman Fort

The original design of the Roman Fort was as a facade. John had many requests to turn this into an actual Roman Fort. After much arm twisting john agreed to produce Straight Walls to allow you to construct a full fort if you wished. We do not know the production quantity,
so would recommend ordering sooner rather than later as we think this will be a limited production run.

Roman Army of the Late Republic

Thracian Peltast

Thracians

Conquistadors

The Spanish were known to have had four falconets and ten brass lombards with them when they first landed in 1519. Spanish gunners had a poor reputation, and crews were mainly made up of seamen, and a mix of foreigners from Italy, Netherlands and Portugal.

Conquistadors

Aztec – Tlaxcalans

Talaxcaltecs

2nd Massachusetts Regiment

2nd Massachusetts Regiment

Hessian Jager Corps

Hessian Jager Corps

Continental Army – Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold was an American military officer who served as a general during the American Revolutionary War, fighting for the American Continental Army before defecting to the British in 1780. Arnold was born in the Connecticut Colony and was a merchant operating ships on the Atlantic Ocean when the war began in 1775. He joined the growing army outside Boston and distinguished himself through acts of intelligence and bravery. His actions included the Capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775, defensive and delaying tactics at the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776 which allowed American forces time to prepare New York’s defenses, the Battle of Ridgefield, Connecticut (after which he was promoted to major general), and operations in relief of the Siege of Fort Stanwix.

Arnold was to distinguish himself in both Battles of Saratoga, even though General Gates removed him from field command after the first battle, following a series of escalating disagreements and disputes that culminated in a shouting match.

During the fighting in the second battle, Arnold disobeyed Gates’ orders and took to the battlefield to lead attacks on the British defenses. It was the American forces, led by Major General Benedict Arnold, which managed to take the Breymann Redoubt, which gave them a strong position behind the British lines. The loss of the Redoubt rendered the British position untenable. The British Army was forced to pull back to the river, from which position they would attempt to retreat north the next morning.

Continental Army

The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that saw extensive service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The unit was the first African-American regiment organized in the northern states during the Civil War. Authorized by the Emancipation proclamation, the regiment consisted of African-American enlisted men commanded by white officers.

The The regiment’s first battlefield action took place in a skirmish with Confederate troops on James Island, South Carolina, on July 16. The regiment stopped a Confederate assault, losing 42 men in the process.

The regiment gained recognition on July 18, 1863, when it spearheaded an assault on Fort Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina. 270 of the 600 men who charged Fort Wagner were “killed, wounded or captured.” At this battle Colonel Shaw was killed, along with 29 of his men; 24 more later died of wounds, 15 were captured, 52 were missing in action and never accounted for, and 149 were wounded. The total regimental casualties of 270 would be the highest total for the 54th in a single engagement during the war.

Although Union forces were not able to take and hold the fort (despite taking a portion of the walls in the initial assault), the 54th was widely acclaimed for its valor during the battle, and the event helped encourage the further enlistment and mobilization of African-American troops, a key development that President Abraham Lincoln once noted as helping to secure the final victory. Decades later, Sergeant William Harvey Carney was awarded the Medal of Honor for grabbing the U.S. flag as the flag bearer fell, carrying the flag to the enemy ramparts and back, and singing “Boys, the old flag never touched the ground!” While other African Americans had since been granted the award by the time it was presented to Carney, Carney’s is the earliest action for which the Medal of Honor was awarded to an African American.

The service of the 54th Massachusetts, particularly their charge at Fort Wagner, soon became one of the most famous episodes of the war, interpreted through artwork, poetry and song. More recently, the 54th Massachusetts gained prominence through the award-winning film Glory.

American Civil War, 1861 – 1865

Knights Of The Skies

The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during World War I. The D.III was flown by many top German aces, including Wilhelm Frankl, Erich Löwenhardt, Manfred von Richthofen, Karl Emil Schäfer, Ernst Udet, and Kurt Wolff, and Austro-Hungarian ones, like Godwin von Brumowski.

It was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as “Bloody April” 1917.

Following the successful Albatros D.I and D.II series, the D.III utilized the same semi-monocoque, plywood-skinned fuselage. However, at the request of the Idflieg (Inspectorate of Flying Troops), the D.III adopted a sesquiplane wing arrangement broadly similar to the French Nieuport 11. The upper wingspan was extended, while the lower wing was redesigned with reduced chord and a single main spar. “V” shaped interplane struts replaced the previous parallel struts. For this reason, British aircrews commonly referred to the D.III as the “V-strutter.”

The D.III entered squadron service in December 1916, and was immediately acclaimed by German aircrews for its maneuverability and rate of climb. Two faults with the new aircraft were soon identified. Like the D.II, early D.IIIs featured a Teves und Braun airfoil-shaped radiator in the center of the upper wing, where it tended to scald the pilot if punctured. From the 290th D.III onward, the radiator was offset to the right on production machines while others were soon moved to the right as a field modification.

Aircraft deployed in Palestine used two wing radiators, to cope with the warmer climate.

Albatros built approximately 500 D.III aircraft at its Johannisthal factory.

In the spring of 1917, D.III production shifted to Albatros’ subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW), to permit Albatros to concentrate on development and production of the D.V.

Between April and August 1917, Idflieg issued five separate orders for a total of 840 D.IIIs. The OAW variant underwent its Typenprüfung in June 1917. Production commenced at the Schneidemühl factory in June and continued through December 1917. OAW aircraft were distinguishable by their larger, rounded rudders.

Werner Voss, during his period with Jasta Boelcke, flew this highly decorated Albatros DIII. Whilst the cowling remained grey, the nose on Voss’s plane was painted red, which was common for almost all the planes in Jasta 2. The plywood fuselage had a red heart , edged white, similar to a Valentine’s Day chocolate box on each side, and later a third heart was painted on the top of the fuselage. Also on each side of the plane , a white swastika surrounded by an olive wreath was painted. This was considered a sign of good luck or fortune, and was a common symbol which could be found on many planes from almost every nation during WW1.

Werner Voss (13 April 1897 – 23 September 1917) was a World War I German flying ace credited with 48 aerial victories.

By 6 April 1917, Voss had scored 24 victories and awarded Germany’s highest award, the Pour le Mérite. The medal’s mandatory month’s leave removed Voss from the battlefield during Bloody April; in his absence, Richthofen scored 13 victories. Nevertheless, Richthofen regarded Voss as his only possible rival as top scoring ace of the war.

His last flight came on 23 September 1917, just hours after his 48th victory. After he fell in solo opposition to eight British aces, he was described by his preeminent foe, James McCudden, as “the bravest German airman.

Von Richthofen and most other German aces won the majority of their victories on the D.III, and it even turned out to be more successful than its alleged successor, and continued in production for several months after the introduction of the D.V.

Peak service was in November 1917, with 446 aircraft on the Western Front. 1,866 Albatros D.III planes were produced.

The D.III did not disappear with the end of production, however. It remained in frontline service well into 1918.

As late as March 1918, there were still nearly 200 D.IIIs in service on the Western Front, eight months even after the introduction of its successor.

Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Inter-War Aviation

A U.S. Navy Aircraft carrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

During flight operations, fire fighters and crash crews usually had at least two men standing by wearing asbestos suits as a fire rescue team.

These were nicknamed “Hot Papas”, and it was their job to literally pull men out of burning planes.

Inter-War Aviation Collection

Second World War Aircraft

A U.S. Navy Aircraft carrier’s deck crew exists to do one thing: to consistently put aircraft into the air and safely recover them after they launch. In order to make this happen, there exists a small army of flight deck facilitators, and each individual has their own role primarily designated by the color of the shirt they wear.

During flight operations, fire fighters and crash crews usually had at least two men standing by wearing asbestos suits as a fire rescue team.

These were nicknamed “Hot Papas”, and it was their job to literally pull men out of burning planes.

JJD Second World War Aircraft Collection

New King & Country March Releases!

March 2nd, 2019

A WINTER WARRIOR

Most armies, given the choice, prefer NOT to fight their wars and battles in wintertime… It’s cold, miserable, damp and the daylight hours can be very short.

All that being said the decision where, and importantly, when armies ‘take to the field’ is usually left for their commanders to decide.

Two of the most uncomfortable locations to fight a winter battle or a campaign in was the Eastern Front between 1942 and 1945 and the Ardennes Forest in December 1944.

As many collectors know the Sturmgeschutz Ⅲ more commonly referred to as the StuGⅢ was Germany’s second most-produced armoured fighting vehicle during World War 2.

Built on the chassis of the already-proven PanzerⅢ, it replaced the Panzer turret with an armoured, fixed superstructure mounting a more powerful 7.5cm main gun. This was originally intended as a mobile assault gun for direct-fire infantry support. Later, the StuGⅢ adopted in addition another role, similar to that of the Jagdpanzer… tank destroyer!

As secondary armament the StuGⅢ mounted the tried and tested MG34 machine gun complete with protective shield.

Approximately 10,000 StuGⅢ’s of various types were built between 1942 and 1945 with the vast majority being supplied to the Wehrmacht. Small numbers were however sold to Finland, Romania, Bulgaria, Spain and Hungary. A few even turned up in Syria and took part in the 1967 Arab / Israeli War.

This “winterized” StuGⅢ has been given by its crew a ‘winter whitewash’ coat of camouflage and could be placed somewhere in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944… or perhaps on the Russian Front in the latter half of WW2.

SPECIAL NOTE: Just 200 of this version are available and each one comes with a well-wrapped up vehicle commander scanning the horizon for any enemy activity.

Battle of the Bulge

ROMANS & BARBARIANS

  • RnB020 Centurion & His Prisoner – This Centurion, sword in hand, is taking no chances with this captured Celtic warrior. Although trussed up in a heavy wooden stock some prisoners are capable of anything even when ‘locked-up’ in this manner.
  • RnB022 Kneel & Obey – A kneeling Gallic prisoner is told to pay attention and watch the fate of other Roman captives as they are being punished.
  • RnB034 Galloping Gaul – Spear held aloft and ready to be thrown at the hated Roman invaders this mounted Gaul is not impressed by the might of Rome.
  • RnB037 Charging Gaul – Totally unafraid this Gaul charges towards the enemy.
  • RnB039 Shouting Celt – Sword in one hand, shield in the other, this red-haired Celt screams defiance at the enemy.

Romans

RETURN TO THE ALAMO

SIX additional reinforcements for the beleaguered garrison still holding off Santa Anna’s army at the little mission in San Antonio, Texas.

  • RTA107 Tennessee Woodsman – One of Davy Crockett’s backwoods volunteers who journeyed with him to Texas to join the fight for Texan independence.
  • RTA108 James Murray Brown – This Pennsylvania native was born in 1800 and moved to Texas in 1835. He took part in the siege of Bexar and became part of the Alamo garrison where he perished on the morning of March 6, 1836.
  • RTA110 The Flagbearer – Micajah Autry, originally from North Carolina was born in 1793 and fought previously in the War of 1812. A well-read and educated man he had been a farmer, teacher and a lawyer before enlisting in the ‘Volunteer Auxiliary Corps of Texas’ in early 1836 just in time to take part in the Alamo struggle. Here he carries one of several flags that are said to have flown over the Alamo itself… This one was the Mexican tricolor complete with ‘1824’ sewn in black in the middle of the tricolour’s white strip. Like all the other defenders he died on the morning of March 6.
  • RTA116 Thomas R. Miller – Tom Millar was a member of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers. Under the command of Lieut. George C. Kimble and Capt. Albert Martin, Millar and 30 other men successfully passed through Santa Anna’s besieging army and galloped into the Alamo on February 23, 1836 never to leave.
  • RTA117 George Neggan of South Carolina – Another horseman of the Gonzales Ranging Company armed only with a pistol.
  • RTA120 James C. Gwynne – Originally born in England he moved to Texas from Mississippi where he had been a farmer. At the Alamo he was a member of Capt. William Carey’s artillery company. Here, however, he’s taken up his musket to fire at the attacking Mexican infantry.

Remember the Alamo

THE KING’S GERMANS

For 13 years between 1803 and 1816, there was one major British Army unit that primarily consisted of German expatriates… The King’s German Legion.

Under overall British command the Legion earned the unique distinction of being the only German military force to fight without interruption against the French during the Napoleonic Wars!

After the occupation of Hanover by Napoleon’s troops in 1803 many former Hanoverian officers and soldiers fled to Britain where GeorgeⅢ King of Great Britain was also Elector of Hanover.

The King sanctioned a volunteer corps of all arms infantry, artillery and cavalry to be raised and named them, ‘The King’s German Legion’.

Soon, it grew to a strength of 14,000 officers and men and played a vital role in Britain’s defeat of the French emperor.

Among the Legion’s most famous regiments were two Regiments of Light Dragoons. Here, for the first time, are King & Country’s mounted tribute to these fine German horsemen.

  • NA427 KGL Dragoon w/Sabre Down  – Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • NA429 KGL Dragoon Advancing at the Gallup – Based on a classic illustration of a mounted charging Dragoon of the Napoleonic era this figure looks about to engage an enemy infantryman or perhaps a gunner!
  • NA430 KGL Dragoon Charge – You can almost hear the shout as this particular Dragoon charges forward to engage the opposition sabre held menacingly over his head.
  • NA431 KGL Dragoon Moving Forward – This Dragoon rests his sabre on his shoulder as he prepares to change from the gallup to the full charge.

The King’s German Legion

Vietnam

Here are some great-looking USMC reinforcements fighting their way into the old Imperial capital.

  • VN040 The Scout – Cautiously edging forward this ‘Grunt’ takes a look at what is just around the corner…
  • VN043 Hunkered-Down – Another Marine is also interested in seeing what’s just around the next corner.
  • VN044 Wait – One hand stretched back to tell his buddies to halt this Marine is watching and waiting.
  • VN045 Kneeling LAW Gunner – In the close-quarter fighting that took place all over HUE the M72 LAW (Light Anti Tank Weapon) proved invaluable at taking out enemy bunkers, buildings and machine gun ‘nests’… One shot… One kill!
  • VN050 Vietnam War Dog – War dogs could be trained to sniff-out explosives or uncover hidden exits and entrances to underground bunkers and tunnels. This Marine handler and his German Shepherd seem to be on the trail of something… or someone.

Vietnam – Tet’68

Streets of Old Hong Kong

  • HK283 Grain & Grocery Store – This three-level façade is typical of the kind of general food store that used to be found all over Hong Kong and other Chinese cities. On display are various kinds of ‘smoked and cured meats’ as well as large display buckets of different types of rice… the main staple of many Asian diets.
  • HK286M Chinese Grocer – The perfect ‘companion piece’ for HK283, or indeed any of our traditional Chinese Shop / House facades. Our grocer is dressed in the style of a late 19th Century, businessman… prosperous to show that he is successful but not ‘too prosperous’ to reveal that he might be charging too much for his goods and services!!!
  • HK286G Chinese Grocer

Orient

John Jenkins Roman Pontoon Bridge

March 2nd, 2019

ROMAN, PONTOON BRIDGE

Roman-designed pontoon bridges, constructed mostly during wartime for the shock and awe of quick raids, and were a specialty of Julius Caesar’s.

In 55 B.C., he built a pontoon bridge that was around 437 yards (400 meters) long to cross the Rhine river, which was traditionally thought by the Germanic tribes to be safely out of reach of Roman power.

Roman leader Caligula is well-known for his brief stint as the emperor of Rome, from 37 AD through 41 AD. Some say that Caligula displayed signs of madness during his reign. According to historical accounts, one of these displays of madness was Caligula’s demand for the construction of a floating bridge across the Bay of Baiae so that he could ride triumphantly across it. Some historians dispute the building of this bridge. With differing accounts of exactly what happened during Caligula’s reign as emperor, we may never know whether the floating bridge of Baiae was actually constructed, but it remains a lasting story of power, madness, and what happens when the two intertwine.

Please note this is for sale on a pre order basis only. Pre Order period ends March 31st, 2019. Do not miss out.

Roman Pontoon Bridge

New Jenkins March Releases!

February 23rd, 2019

THE ROMAN ARMY OF THE LATE REPUBLIC

Republican Romans

GERMANIC WARRIORS

Following two decades of Roman occupation, Germania Magna erupted into revolt in AD 9, resulting in the stunning loss of three Roman legions to an alliance of Germanic nations at Teutoburg. The Battle of the Teutoburg Fores, described as the Varian Disaster by Roman historians, took place in the Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions and their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus.

The alliance was led by Arminius, a Germanic officer of Varus’ auxilia. Arminius had acquired Roman citizenship and had received a Roman military education, which enabled him to deceive the Roman commander methodically and anticipate the Roman army’s tactical responses.

Despite several successful campaigns and raids by the Romans in the years after the battle, they never again attempted to conquer the Germanic territories east of the Rhine river. The victory of the Germanic tribes against Rome’s legions in the Teutoburg Forest would have far-reaching effects on the subsequent history of both the ancient Germanic peoples and the Roman Empire. Contemporary and modern

historians have generally regarded Arminius’ victory over Varus as “Rome’s greatest defeat”, one of the most decisive battles recorded in military history, and as “a turning-point in world history”

The Cherusci nation, was a Germanic tribe that fought at the Teutoburg Pass, Weser River, Idistaviso and the Agrivarian Wall under its war chief Arminius. These warriors were perfectly equipped for the Germanic landscape of open fields, forests and swamps. The weapons which were used included the long lance or Framea, which could be swung, thrust or thrown at an opponent.

Hair was grown long and often tied up in a figure of eight or “Suebian” knot.

In the Cherusci warrior the Roman Legionary met a formidable opponent. The Germanic warrior was a well trained, battle-hardened, combat ready and motivated fighter, who excelled in irregular warfare, ambushes, raids and petty warfare. In an ambush the lightly armed Germanic fighter could decisively defeat a heavily equipped legionary by using surprise and the terrain to his advantage.

In a set-piece battle the German could stand up to the Roman Leginary discipline and formations for a while, but in close quarters combat the advantage eventually shifted to the legionary, as at the Battle of Idistaviso, and the Angrivarian Wall.

Enemies of Rome

THRACIANS

Thracians

THE AZTEC EMPIRE

This Aztec chieftain wears a sleeveless corselet called an “ehuatl”, which was a garment of feather-covered cloth worn over cotton armour. Senior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of blue feathers. Junior chieftains are described as wearing a “ehuatl” of red feathers.

Additional armour was provided by greaves, armbands and wristlets, and a helmet made from wood, and bone which was ornately decorated with feathers.

The greaves and armbands were generally made of gilded leather, bark or thin gold.

This figure does not carry a standard on the back, instead has a “skin drum”. These drums were used to transmit certain orders on the battlefield.

Aztec Empire

THE TLAXCALTECS

The Tlaxcalans, or Talaxcaltecs, are an indigenous group of Nahua ethnicity who inhabited the republic of Tlaxcala and present-day Mexican state of Tlaxcala.

Despite early attempts by the Mexica, the Tlaxcalteca were never conquered by the Aztec Triple Alliance. The Aztecs allowed them to maintain their independence so that they could participate in the xochiyaoyatl (flower wars) with them to facilitate human sacrifice

The Tlaxcaltecs served as allies to Hernán Cortés and his fellow Spanish conquistadors, and were instrumental in the invasion of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire, helping the Spanish reach the Valley of Anahuac and providing a key contingent of the invasion force

A flower war or flowery war (Nahuatl languages: xōchiyāōyōtl, Spanish: guerra florida) was a ritual war fought intermittently between the Aztec Triple Alliance and its enemies from the “mid-1450s to the arrival of the Spaniards in 1519.

The Aztecs practiced human sacrifice. Most of the people sacrificed were not residents of the Aztec’s major cities, rather they were captured in wars, both wars of conquest and “wars of the flowers”. The Aztec term for wars for captives was Xochiyayoyotl.

The Xochiyayoyotl came about after a long famine, from 1450 to 1454. Crops failed all over the Valley of Mexico due to bad weather. To the Aztecs, it showed the gods were displeased; they needed more blood and human hearts. Montezuma I reigned during the great famine. His brother Tlacaelel was Montezuma’s Snake Woman or first adviser, a general in the Aztec army and of the highest warrior order, the Shorn Ones.

When bad weather continued the famine, Tlacaelel suggested a ritual or ceremonial war to provide captives for sacrifice for the Aztecs and their enemies. The nearby Tlaxcala were the Triple Alliance’s main enemy. They had also experienced the famine. Through human sacrifice, the gods would be assuaged for both sides.

Though there were undoubtedly more reasons for Flower wars, such as further terrorizing the surrounding areas, they began during the great famine. Tenochtitlan reached an agreement with its enemies the Tlaxcala, Cholula and Huejotzingo, to war for captives. Their warriors would be told not to kill enemy warriors, but to capture them. Once each side had enough captives, the battle would end. The captured warriors would then be taken for sacrifice by both sides in the battle.

Thus, from time to time, Aztecs would arrange a Flower war when the need for human captives arose. In essence, these were ceremonial in nature, with all the details arranged beforehand by the leaders involved. Nevertheless, they were still a matter of life and death for the warriors; to be captured meant being sacrificed. While a sacrifice was considered an honorable death, no doubt most warriors would prefer to avoid it.

Whether a Flower war was arranged simply to satisfy religious demands for sacrificial victims, to train young warriors and to ensure social advancement for warriors or if it had underlying purposes of wearing down the enemy and terrorizing neighboring lands is still debated by scholars.

Some scholars maintain that the Flower wars were more like tournaments, with no more political purpose than to satisfy warriors in vying for advancement and provide ritual bloodletting and sacrifices. Other scholars see darker political aspects to these ritual wars: to demonstrate Aztec might, to wear down the enemy through attrition and to allow Aztec leaders to subjugate their own people through fear of losing loved ones.

The Aztecs had never managed to conquer the Tlaxcala. While the Tlaxcala were also Aztecs, they refused to pay tribute to the Triple Alliance. Montezuma might have thought that through the Flower wars, the Triple Alliance would be able to wear down the Tlaxcala and capture more of their warriors than they could afford to lose. If so, the Tlaxcala delivered the final blow: they allied with the Spanish in conquering and defeating the Aztec Empire.

Many sources depict high status warriors wearing the distinctive back ornaments of their communities. The great white heron represented the house of Tizatlan. The “Tlahuiztli” is covered in large yellow feathers, and the warrior wears the red and white headband which was an attribute of Tlaxcallan nationality.

Talaxcaltecs

SPANISH CONQUISTADORS

The Spanish were known to have had four falconets and ten brass lombards with them when they first landed in 1519. Spanish gunners had a poor reputation, and crews were mainly made up of seamen, and a mix of foreigners from Italy, Netherlands and Portugal.

Conquistadors

American Revolution – NEILSON’S FARMHOUSE.

A young and ambitious John Neilson came to this area in 1772 from just outside Elizabeth, NJ. He went to work in the village of Stillwater, two miles south of the house, on the farm of Abner Quitterfield. Only three years later, in 1775, he leased 150 acres of land, and ‘married the boss’s daughter,’ Lydia. Within a year or two, they built this small house on the lot he had leased.

In 1777, a British army was invading southward from Canada into New York. Their route would take them through the Neilsons’ back yard. John took Lydia and their possessions to the safety of her parents’ home in Stillwater. He then exchanged his home for a tent, serving with his local militia regiment—some of whom would be encamped nearby.

American army officers moved into his empty house on September 12, 1777. About ten miles north, British forces steadily descended the Hudson River Valley as American troops hastily built menacing defenses 3/4 of a mile east on Bemus Heights—a ridge of bluffs overlooking the Hudson. The American army used this house as a divisional and brigade headquarters. Ephraim Woodworth’s house, 1/2 mile south of Neilson’s, was headquarters for the American army commanding general, Horatio Gates.

The only account from the time of the battles says General Enoch Poor of New Hampshire and General Benedict Arnold of Connecticut were quartered here.

Fighting came within about one mile of this house. As Gates’ army moved on, though, they left behind a farm in near-ruins. John and Lydia returned shortly after the army’s departure and began restoring the farm. Their crops had been ravaged, and their fields torn up. John filed a damage claim in May 1778, in the amount of £100 (about three times a soldier’s annual salary), but he was not reimbursed.

The Neilsons continued with their family life, eventually having eight children. As the family grew, a small house would no longer do; the first U.S. Census from 1790 lists eleven people living here. By 1830, they had built a larger, two-story home.

By the 1890s, they had pushed back the original part of the house and added a carriage barn.

This house is based on the reproduction of Neilson,s Farmhouse, now standing in the grounds of the SARATOGA BATTLEFIELD NATIONAL PARK.

The model can be suitable for the French Indian War, American Revolution, and of course the American Civil War.

The model has a lift off roof, with basic interior detail, and a front door which can be opened or closed..

Drums along the Mohawk

MORGAN’S RIFLEMEN

Morgans Riflemen

THE 1st CANADIAN REGIMENT

1st Canadian Regiment

New Hobby Master Announcements Expected August 2019!

February 3rd, 2019

Modern Air Power

New Releases Expected August 2019!

Modern Air Power Collection

Air Power – 1:48 Scale

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

New Britain’s Releases Expected Late February!

February 3rd, 2019

Museum Collection

Expected late February / March 2019!

Museum Collection

Brunswickers

Brunswickers

American Civil war

American Civil War

WWI – Battle of Somme

Battle of the Somme

New King & Country February Releases!

February 3rd, 2019

VIETNAM FIRE SUPPORT!

When American troops first deployed in force to South Vietnam in 1965 they were supported by a number of brand-new airfield and ground installations that required a low altitude defense system.

The anti aircraft system then in operation with U.S. Forces worldwide was provided by HAWK missile batteries… These however proved inadequate in Vietnam and an alternative had to be found and so the U.S. Army began recalling the older M42 ‘Duster’ anti aircraft guns back into service and organizing them into Air Defense Artillery battalions (ADA).

Beginning in the Fall of 1966 three battalions of ‘Dusters’ were operational in Vietnam each consisting of a headquarters battery and four ‘Duster’ batteries, each augmented by one Quad .50 battery and an artillery searchlight battery.

Despite a few early ‘air kills’, a major air threat from North Vietnam never materialized and ADA crews found themselves increasingly involved in ground support missions. Most often those involved point security… convoy escort and / or perimeter defense.

Probably the ‘Duster’s’ finest hour came at the time of the TET Offensive in 1968 when M42’s and their twin 40mm guns made short work of massed VC and NVA infantry attacks and helped knock out enemy bunker and defence positions.

U.S. Army and Marine units came to place a high value on the mobile close artillery support the M42 ‘Duster’ provided time and time again.

Perhaps the Grunts’ own graffiti scrawled on one M42 said it all… “Have Guns Will Travel!”

  • VN033 The M42 DUSTER – During the Korean War (1950-53) the U.S. Army decided it needed a mobile anti aircraft gun that could utilize the existing chassis of the M41 Tank. Since 40mm guns were seen as the most effective twin gun mounting, similar to those on most U.S. Navy ships of that era, they were ‘married’ to a M41 chassis and designated the M42. The first M42’s entered service in late 1953 with production halted in 1960 after some 3,700 vehicles had been produced.These in turn began to be replaced by the HAWK Surface to Air Missile units in the early 1960’s. By 1963 most ‘Dusters’ had been transferred to National Guard units… Until Vietnam! Our King & Country model, made up of over 95 separate parts, is typical of the U.S. Army “Dusters” of the late 1960’s period during the Vietnam War. Two seated Gunners man the twin 40mm ‘Bofors ’ guns and the vehicle also comes with double radio antennas and a side-mounted M60 machine gun. Painted in standard U.S. Army Olive Drab this particular M42 is nicknamed ‘Double Trouble’ and stands ready for action… anytime, anywhere.
  • VN042 Duster Add-On Crew – Two essential add-ons to complete your M42 in action… A kneeling NCO rifleman observes the battle as his buddy prepares to load a ‘clip’ of 40mm shells into one of the guns.
  • VN046 Crouching Marine Firing M72 LAW – The M72 LAW (Light Anti Tank Weapon) was a portable, one-shot, 66mm unguided anti tank weapon first adopted by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps in 1963. Although originally intended for anti armoured vehicle use U.S. ground forces frequently used it against enemy bunker and fixed defence positions especially in urban areas.Our Marine crouches as he aims the weapon at his target… One shot, one hit!
  • VN049 Dead or Alive – M16 pointing directly at the enemy this Marine is taking no chances as he approaches a North Vietnamese Army (NVA) casualty.

Vietnam – Tet 68

SAME MARINES… DIFFERENT WAR

  • USMC051 Softly, Softly – Like his Vietnam counterpart VN049, this WW2 “Leatherneck” cautiously edges forward towards some Japanese dead or perhaps he is moving carefully through a possible minefield… you make the decision.
  • USMC052 Pacific War Dog – During WW2 the Marine Corps trained a small number of ‘War Dogs’ for service in the Pacific. They were first used on Bougainville and Peleliu but saw most active duty on Guam where 60 war dogs and their handlers went ashore and twenty were killed or believed ‘missing-in-action.’ Some other war dogs served as ‘messenger dogs’ while more were used as ‘sentries’ or on the ‘point’ of patrols where their superior animal senses often negated any surprise attack or ambush by the Japanese.Not surprisingly Marine ‘war dogs’ were expert at ‘flushing-out’ hidden enemies and, alas, suffered heavy losses especially on Iwo Jima.‘War Dogs’ were mostly recruited from civilian owners and screened to eliminate high-strung or vicious animals. Mongrels often proved the best adapted to their military duties followed by German Shepherds… Dobermans however turned out to be ‘too nervous’.Our kneeling Marine handler, complete with Winchester Shotgun and holstered M1911 Colt Automatic gets ready for the next operation together with his brown & black cross breed called ‘Sailor’.

Battle of TARAWA

ROME AT WAR

  • ROM031 Pilum Thrower – As this Roman soldier runs forward he protects his body with his shield as he launches his Pilum at the enemy…

Romans – King and Country

THE REAL WEST

Not so long ago several of our ‘Real West’ collectors suggested to us that we should produce different colour variations of a few of ‘Custer’s Last Stand’ figures. And so, after carefully considering their suggestions we selected a few figures on either side that might be perfect candidates for an ‘alternative’ version…

  • TRW148 Single-handed First Aid – Gripping the cloth in his teeth this wounded trooper attempts to bandage his bleeding wrist while still holding his ‘Army’ Colt in one hand.
  • TRW149 Dismounted & Trapped! – With his horse shot from under him and collapsed on top of his left leg this trooper is already doomed. Defiantly, he raises himself to aim his pistol at attacking Indians.
  • TRW151 Dazed & Bleeding – Another forlorn trooper has been struck in the head by an Indian warrior’s club or tomahawk… Partially blinded by his wound he attempts to crawl to safety…
  • TRW154 Medicine Crow – Although most of the hostile Indians Custer faced at the Little Big Horn were Sioux and Cheyenne a number of other tribes were also present… Among them a young warrior chief called ‘Medicine Crow’ seen here letting loose an arrow at the beleaguered ‘Long Knives’.
  • TRW158 Dog Wolf – A kneeling dismounted Cheyenne warrior, ‘Dog Wolf’ takes careful aim with his captured U.S. Cavalry carbine.

Battle of Little Big Horn June 25/26, 1876.

TOMMY ATKINS ESQ. IN ACTION

‘Tommy Atkins’ (often just Tommy) has been slang for a common soldier in the British Army for over two centuries. The origins of the name go as far back as the Napoleonic Wars. One common belief is that the name was chosen by the Duke of Wellington himself after having been inspired by the bravery of one of his private soldiers during the Peninsula War. After one particular battle the Duke came upon a certain severely wounded soldier and asked after his condition. The terribly injured soldier simply replied, “I’m all right sir… All in a day’s work” and died shortly afterwards.

Sometime later the Duke was asked what generic British name should be used on all army forms… He remembered the brave but gravely wounded soldier from his Peninsula days and also his name… ‘Tommy Atkins’.

Here are some welcome British Army infantry of the Napoleonic era that would be proud to bear the name Tommy Atkins.

  • NA417 Colonel of the Regiment – This mounted senior officer bellows out his orders in the heat of battle.
  • NA418 Infantry Captain – As bullet, shot and shell erupt about him this officer remains cool, calm and collected… sword in hand. The epitome of the British ‘stiff upper lip’.
  • NA419 Infantryman with Pike Staff – This private soldier has momentarily put aside his ‘Brown Bess’ Musket to pick up a long pike staff from a dead sergeant… All the better to reach out and stab any attacking French cavalryman.
  • NA420 Drummer Boy – Every Line Company in British infantry regiments had its own ‘Drummer Boy’, some as young as 11 or 12 but usually about 15 years of age. Many of these young lads were orphans of the regiment and had grown up within it when their parents were still alive.
  • NA421 Reaching For A Cartridge – This standing infantryman stands ready to repel the enemy as he reaches back into his ammunition pouch for a fresh cartridge.
  • NA422 Kneeling Cocking His Musket – Weapon fully loaded this kneeling ‘Red Coat’ pulls back the hammer of his musket.
  • NA423 Kneeling Ready – Weapon loaded, bayonet fixed and awaiting further orders.
  • NA424 Lying Prone Firing – Lying on the ground in front of the ranks of his kneeling and standing comrades this ‘Tommy Atkins’ takes careful aim.
  • NA425 Hors de Combat – Out of action due to injury or damage this crawling soldier tries to seek cover in the midst of the action.
  • NA-S07 Blood, Bullets & Cold Steel – A combined ‘Extra Value Added Set’ that brings all of these great figures together and offers them to dealers and collectors at a GREAT PRICE!

British Napoleonic Infantry & Artillery

New Hobby Master July Releases

January 20th, 2019

Air Power – 1:32

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:72 & 1:32 Scale.

Air Power – 1:48

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

Modern Air Power

Modern Air Power Collection

Ground Power

Ground Power Collection

Sea Power

Scale 1:700

Sea Power Series Scale 1:700

New John Jenkins February Releases!

January 20th, 2019

Second World War

The iconic Sturmgeschütz III (Assault Gun) was conceived by none other than Field Marshal Erich von Manstein. Created by mating an armored casemate to a Panzer III chassis, the StuG III was intended to support infantry forces with direct fire. Originally armed with a short barrel, low velocity 75mm cannon, it served admirably in this role. However, following German encounters with the heavily armored Russian T-34, KV-1 and KV-2, in 1942 the StuG III was modified to mount the powerful long barreled, high velocity 75mm StuK40/L48 cannon. With this heavier armament, the StuG III shifted roles to that of a tank destroyer, where its powerful cannon, heavy armor, and low silhouette made it a deadly opponent for Allied armor.

The most prolific model StuG was the Ausf G, with 7,720 produced from December 1942 until March 1945. It remained in service due to it’s reliability, excellent combat performance, and inexpensive cost. In 1944, a StuG III cost 82,500 Rechsmarks to produce. In contrast, the Panther cost 117,100 Reichsmarks and a Tiger 250,800 Reichmarks. The StuG III served on all fronts, and even after the introduction of more advanced tanks by the Allies, the StuG III’s 75mm cannon and 80mm of armor protection still proved a deadly combination, especially when used in ambush positions. By wars end, thousands of Allied tanks fell victim to the StuG III.

The GA-20 model represents a StuG III Ausf G produced by Alkett in early 1943 and employed by Panzergrenadier Division “Grossdeutschland” at the Battle of Kursk. Grossdeutschland was the German Heer’s elite formation and from the beginning of Operation Barbarossa it fought exclusively on the Eastern Front against the Russians. Lavishly equipped, at Kursk Grossdeutschland possessed a full Sturmgeschütz Abteilung in addition to its Panther Brigade and a company of the legendary Tiger tanks. Sturmgeschütz Abteilung “GD” fought admirably at Kursk (arguably better than the division’s Panzer units) where it was ably led by Knight’s Cross winner Hauptman Peter Frantz.

The Grossdeutschland StuG III Ausf G features a two-color camo pattern of Dunkelgelb and Olivgrun common at Kursk, individually removable schürzen side armor panels (meant to protect the StuG from Soviet anti-tank rifles), opening loaders hatch, and two machine-gun mounts. Additionally, it has common modifications StuG Abteilung “GD” made to their vehicles, including extra track links mounted on the front as additional armor, extra road wheels that can be mounted on the sides of the StuG, and a stowage rail on the rear engine deck

WWII

Second World War Aircraft

Planes returning from combat missions often carried wounded pilots and crews on board. Flight deck medical teams were always on alert to administer first aid on the spot or to rush the wounded to the ship’s hospital bay. Medical teams often wore a white jersey marked with a red cross.

JJD Aircraft Collection

American Revolution – Drums along the Mohawk

The Breymann Redoubt guarded the British right flank, it was defended by 200 German soldiers. It was overwhelmed and captured in an assault led by Benedict Arnold.

Drums along the Mohawk

Raid on St Francis

In Eastern Woodlands society, there were clear-cut family roles for both the men and women.

Men were responsible for all the hunting and fishing, and sometimes traveled great distances to catch food.

Women generally stayed near the home to look after the children. They tended to any crops, and collected food, nuts, berries and edible plants. Women prepared the animal skins and made and repaired all the clothing.

A moccasin is a shoe, made of deerskin or other soft leather, consisting of a sole (made with leather that has not been “worked”) and sides made of one piece of leather, stitched together at the top, and sometimes with a vamp (additional panel of leather). The sole is soft and flexible and the upper part often is adorned with embroidery or beading. Historically, it is the footwear of many indigenous people of North America; moreover, hunters, traders, and European settlers wore them.

The moccasin derives from the Algonquian language Powhatan word makasin.

Moccasins protect the foot while allowing the wearer to feel the ground. The Plains Indians wore hard-sole moccasins, given that their territorial geography featured rock and cacti. The eastern Indian tribes wore soft-sole moccasins, for walking in leaf-covered forest ground.

Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Aztec

The Peasant levy made up the core of the Aztec army. These commoners had no access to extravagant armour, and usually wore simple quilted cotton armour. The majority of these troops were armed with a bow. These archers were sometimes accompanied by shield-bearers, who were trained to defend the archers and were experts at deflecting arrows with their shields.

Aztec Empire – Conquest of America

Roman – Late Republic

Roman Army of the Late Republic

Gauls

Enemies of Rome

Conquistadors

Aztec Empire – Conquest of America

American Revolution – 2nd New York Regiment

2nd New York Regiment

American Revolution – Hessian Jager

Hessian Jager Corps

Inter War

Inter-War Aviation

New Thomas Gunn January Releases!

January 20th, 2019

Napoleonic

The 1st (Emperor Alexander) Guards Grenadiers were an elite infantry regiment of the Guards Corps within the Prussian army and a Guards Grenadier regiment of the Imperial German army.

The regiments tradition dates back to 1626 when the regiment was established during the 30 years war as a permanent mercenary unit. The 1st Grenadier regiment was formed towards the end of the Naploeonic wars in 1814 by Fredeick WIlliam 111 of Prussia and named in honour of Alexander 1 who was its first Colonel in Chief.

The regiment later saw action in the Franco-Prussian war and also during WW1.

Thomas Gunn are proud to introduce this new range of figures resplendent in their parade uniforms, with officers, drummers and flag bearers to accompany these in the near future, much like we have done with the Pavlowski grenadiers. As the uniforms for this regiment date for the period 1900-1914 we have included them in the GW series for file reference.

Napoleonic

WWI German

Thomas-Gunn-World-War-One

WWII Allied

The Super Snipe was introduced by Humber in October 1938, it was derived by combining the four litre engine from the Humber Pullman with the chassis of the Humber Snipe. The enhanced power made the Super Snipe a fast car for its day, capable of reaching 79 MPH. The design is attributed to American engineer Delmar Roos, something of a engineering genius who worked for Studebaker at one time.

The Super Snipe was marketed to upper-middle-class managers, professional people and government officials. It was relatively low-priced for its large size and performance, and was similar to American cars in appearance, concept and in providing value for money.

Within a year of introduction, WW II broke out in Europe, however the car continued in production as a military staff car. The Car as a 4-seater 4×2, while the same chassis was used for the Humber armoured reconnaissance car. The Humber was generally used by higher ranking officers and as such we have decorated ours in the colours and markings of one of Britains most famous Field Marshalls Bernard Montgomery. However it will fit well in any diorama be it Normandy, the middle eastand the far east.

The A and C versions are in a middle east/Italian front colour scheme and the B and D versions in a NW Europe/far east olive drab colour scheme. Monty nicknamed the Desert vehicle ‘Old Faithful’ and once he left for Europe it was used by various other British officers, it now stands in the Imperial War Museum where it has just undergone a major renovation.

Thomas-Gunn-WWII-Europe-Allied

WWII German

An SS infanteer with ammunition bandolier and ammunition case stands on parade, works as a great accompaniment to the previous SS parade figures we released last month.

Thomas-Gunn-WWII-Europe-German