The cart is empty.

Your cart contains
{{shoppingcart.totalQuantity}} Item(s)
Subtotal: {{shoppingcart.subtotal}} {{shoppingcart.total}}
View Cart - Checkout

Home Brows My Account Checkout Photo Gallery Search Help

John Jenkins Future Releases #1 - October 2022

Welcome to the October edition. Here we introduce the new announcements. We visit the Battle of Rosebud and then head back the American Revolution and the battle of Cowpens. We hope you enjoy!

The images shown are Prototype images of the sculpted work, prior to master painting.

We hope you enjoy!

THUNDER ON THE PLAINS
THE BLACK HILL WARS 1876-1877
THE BATTLE OF THE ROSEBUD, 17th JUNE 1876 - UNITED STATES INFANTRY

Although the Native Americans hated the US cavalry during the Indian Wars of 1865 through 1891, they learned to respect the infantry.

Crazy Horse called them "Walk-a-Heaps" because they marched into battle.

Duty for the US Army on the frontier consisted mainly of patrolling and small unit actions. For the infantryman this typically involved long, forced marches and counter-marches as they sought contact, which was usually unsuccessful, as the Native Americans were a skilful and elusive foe.

The first day's march for an infantry column was usually limited to no more than 15 miles in order to give the troops an opportunity to adapt themselves to the conditions. For Campaign seasoned troops, 25 miles was considered a good day's march.

Cavalry could travel faster and further, but their grain fed mounts tended to tire after days of continual marching and surprisingly, well trained infantry could outdistance cavalry units over a period of several weeks.

On 28th May 1876, Brigadier General George Crook assumed direct command of the Bighorn and Yellowstone Expedition at Fort Fetterman. Crook had gathered a strong force. Leaving Fort Fetterman on 29th May the 1,051man column consisted of 15 companies from the 2nd and 3rd Cavalry, 5 companies from the 4th and 9th Infantry, 250 mules and 106 wagons.

On the 14th June, the column was joined by 261 Shoshone and Crow allies.

Based on intelligence reports Crook ordered his entire force to prepare for a quick march. Each man was to carry only 1 blanket, 100 rounds of ammunition, and 4 days rations. The wagon train would be left at Goose Creek, and the infantry would be mounted on the pack mules.

On 17 June, Crook's column set out at 0600, marching northward along the south fork of Rosebud Creek. The Crow and Shoshone scouts were particularly apprehensive. Although the column had not yet encountered any sign of Indians, the scouts seemed to sense their presence. The soldiers, particularly the mule-riding infantry, seemed fatigued from the early start and the previous day's 35-mile (56 km) march. Accordingly, Crook stopped to rest his men and animals at 0800. Although he was deep in hostile territory, Crook made no special dispositions for defense. His troops halted in their marching order. The Cavalry battalions led the column, followed by the battalion of mule-borne foot soldiers, and a provisional company of civilian miners and packers brought up the rear.

The Crow and Shoshone scouts remained alert while the soldiers rested. Several minutes later, the soldiers heard the sound of intermittent gunfire coming from the bluffs to the north. As the intensity of fire increased, a scout rushed into the camp shouting, "Lakota, Lakota!" The Battle of the Rosebud had started. By 0830, the Sioux and Cheyenne had hotly engaged Crook's Indian allies on the high ground north of the main body. Heavily outnumbered, the Crow and Shoshone scouts fell back toward the camp, but their fighting withdrawal gave Crook time to deploy his forces. Rapidly firing soldiers drove off the attackers but used up much of the ammunition meant for use later in the campaign. Low on ammunition and with numerous wounded, the General returned to his post.

Historians debate whether Crook's pressing on could have prevented the killing of the five companies of the 7th Cavalry Regiment led by George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

The Sioux troubles increased the need for mounted troops on the frontier, and as early as December 6th 1866, elements of the 18th Infantry were mounted, and operating alongside Cavalry. The practice of using mounted infantry continued until the end of the Indian wars.

THUNDER ON THE PLAINS - THE BLACK HILL WARS 1876-1877
THE BATTLE OF THE ROSEBUD, 17th JUNE 1876 - UNITED STATES CAVALRY

As settlers spread westward across North America after 1780, armed conflicts increased in size, duration, and intensity between settlers and various Indian and First Nation tribes. In 1875, the Great Sioux War of 1876-77 erupted when the Dakota gold rush penetrated the Black Hills. The U.S government decided to stop evicting trespassers from the Black Hills and offered to buy the land from the Sioux. When they refused, the US government decided instead to take the land and gave the Lakota until January 31st, 1876 to return to reservations.

An United States cavalry regiment in 1876 consisted of 12 companies. A cavalry company, at full strength had 3 officers and 70 enlisted men. The US cavalry of 1876 used Lt. Col. Emory Upton's Cavalry Tactics, which was an unified system of drill, which was compatible among the cavalry, infantry and artillery. This meant an officer could move from one branch of service to another. Upton's tactics incorporated a "set of fours" as the basic, or smallest, cavalry unit or squad. This was designed to simplify operations, increase speed, and eliminate cumbersome manoeuvres.

Dismounted skirmishing became the main cavalry mode of engagement with the enemy, which facilitated the dispersal of men on a firing line. On campaign and in battle, cavalrymen did not always perform as mounted skirmishers but rather served as mounted infantry. By dismounting and kneeling under fire, the trooper presented a much smaller target for the enemy and could take aim much more accurately. The preparatory command "to fight on foot", followed by "As skirmishers", required each cavalryman to dismount and deploy along a firing line at 5yd intervals, with 15yd gaps between each set of four men. Odd numbered skirmishers in each set of four fired a round on command and then reloaded as even numbered skirmishers fired on order. Each man then continued to fire roughly in an odd-even sequence without regard to the others until "Cease fire" command was given. Skirmish tactics could be employed by the platoon, company, battalion or even at regimental level. Dismounted skirmishing required one of every four men, designated as a horse holder, to remain with the horses of the other three. Horse holders retired to a safe position in the rear.

The Cheyenne named, the more commonly known The Battle Of The Rosebud, The Battle Where The Girl Saved Her Brother. This was because of an incident during the fight involving the Cheyenne woman Buffalo Calf Road Woman, and her brother Chief Comes In Sight. The battle took place on June 17th 1876 in the Montana territory , between the United States Army and its Crow and Shoshoni allies, against a force consisting mostly of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. Led by Crazy Horse, the Sioux and Cheyenne managed to halt the offensive of General George Crook, untill August.

On 28th May 1876, Brigadier General George Crook assumed direct command of the Bighorn and Yellowstone Expedition at Fort Fetterman. Crook had gathered a strong force. Leaving Fort Fetterman on 29th May the 1,051man column consisted of 15 companies from the 2nd and 3rd Cavalry, 5 companies from the 4th and 9th Infantry, 250 mules and 106 wagons.

On the 14th June, the column was joined by 261 Shoshone and Crow allies.

Based on intelligence reports Crook ordered his entire force to prepare for a quick march. Each man was to carry only 1 blanket, 100 rounds of ammunition, and 4 days rations. The wagon train would be left at Goose Creek, and the infantry would be mounted on the pack mules.

On 17 June, Crook's column set out at 0600, marching northward along the south fork of Rosebud Creek. The Crow and Shoshone scouts were particularly apprehensive. Although the column had not yet encountered any sign of Indians, the scouts seemed to sense their presence. The soldiers, particularly the mule-riding infantry, seemed fatigued from the early start and the previous day's 35-mile (56 km) march. Accordingly, Crook stopped to rest his men and animals at 0800. Although he was deep in hostile territory, Crook made no special dispositions for defense. His troops halted in their marching order. The Cavalry battalions led the column, followed by the battalion of mule-borne foot soldiers, and a provisional company of civilian miners and packers brought up the rear.

The Crow and Shoshone scouts remained alert while the soldiers rested. Several minutes later, the soldiers heard the sound of intermittent gunfire coming from the bluffs to the north. As the intensity of fire increased, a scout rushed into the camp shouting, "Lakota, Lakota!" The Battle of the Rosebud had started. By 0830, the Sioux and Cheyenne had hotly engaged Crook's Indian allies on the high ground north of the main body. Heavily outnumbered, the Crow and Shoshone scouts fell back toward the camp, but their fighting withdrawal gave Crook time to deploy his forces. Rapidly firing soldiers drove off the attackers but used up much of the ammunition meant for use later in the campaign. Low on ammunition and with numerous wounded, the General returned to his post.

Historians debate whether Crook's pressing on could have prevented the killing of the five companies of the 7th Cavalry Regiment led by George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of the Little Bighorn

THE AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1775 - 1783
THE BATTLE OF COWPENS, JANUARY 17th, 1781. - THE BRITISH LEGION - "TARLETON'S RAIDERS"

The Battle of Cowpens was an engagement during the American Revolutionary War fought on January 17th 1781, near the town of Cowpens, South Carolina, between American forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, and British forces under Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, as part of the campaign in the Carolinas.

The battle was a turning point in the American reconquest of South Carolina from the British.

Tarleton's force of 1,000 British troops were set against 2,000 troops under Morgan. Morgan's forces suffered casualties of only 25 killed and 124 wounded. Tarleton's force was almost completely eliminated with almost 30% casualties and 55% of his force captured or missing, with Tarleton himself and only about 200 British troops escaping.

Morgan's forces conducted a double envelopment of the British forces, the only double envelopment of the war.

The British Legion was a British provincial regiment established during the American Revolutionary War, composed of British loyalist American infantry and dragoons. It was known as Tarleton's Raiders after the British officer who led most of its day to day activities, Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, and the green uniform coats. It was an unit the size of a regiment consisting of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, and able to operate independently.

The unit was raised in New York in July 1778 by Sir Henry Clinton in order to merge combined infantry and cavalry forces and a battery of light artillery.

The regiment was commanded by William Lord Cathcart, as colonel.

Once the unit left New York, Banastre Tarleton was commissioned as Lieutenant colonel, and took full operational command.

The Legion's peak operational strength was approximately 250 cavalry and 200 infantry.

SIR BANASTRE TARLETON, (21st August 1754 - 15th January 1833), was a British genaral and politician. He was best known as the Lieutenant Colonel leading the British legion towards the end of the American Revolution. He was later to serve in Portugal and held commands in Ireland and England.

After returning to Great Britain in 1781 at the age of 27, Tarleton was elected a member of Parliament for Liverpool and returned to office in the early 19th Century. He became a prominent Whig politician.

In South Carolina his British Legion were harried by Francis Marion, "The Swamp Fox", an American militia commander who practiced guerilla warfare against the British. Throughout the campaigns, Tarleton was unable to capture the "Swamp Fox" or thwart his operations. Marion's local popularity among anti-British South Carolinas ensured continual aid and comfort for the American cause.

In contrast, Tarleton alienated the colonial citizens with arbitrary confiscations of cattle and food stocks.

The fictitious Colonel William Tavington, played by Jason Isaacs, in the 2000 film "The Patriot"      was based on Tarleton.

The British Legion was disbanded on October 10th, 1783. Most of those discharged settled in Nova Scotia.