Archive for September, 2015

New John Jenkins Releases For October 2015!

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015

Knights of the Skies


The FOKKER EI armed models started shipping to front line units in June 1915. Although initially armed with a Parabellum LMG 14, they were soon re-fitted with the IMG 08 “Spandau”.
The 100hp Oberursel U.1 powered EII was developed concurrently with the EI and started entering service in July 1915.

In April 1915, the Eindecker (“Monoplane”) was the first purpose-built German fighter aircraft and the first aircraft to be fitted with synchronizer gear, enabling the pilot to fire a machine gun through the arc of the propeller without striking the blades. The Eindecker granted the German Air Service a degree of air superiority from July 1915 until early 1916. This period was known as the “Fokker Scourge,” during which Allied aviators regarded their poorly armed aircraft as “Fokker Fodder”. The Eindecker was based on Fokker’s unarmed A.III scout (itself following very closely the design of the French Morane-Saulnier H shoulder-wing monoplane) which was fitted with a synchronizer mechanism controlling a single Parabellum MG14 machine gun.
Anthony Fokker personally demonstrated the system on 23 May 1915, having towed the prototype aircraft behind his touring car to a military airfield near Berlin.


The Morane-Saulnier N was one of the few operational monoplanes of WW1. It had an extremely sensitive elevator response and fast landing speed but was considerably more manouverable than its German opponents at the time. Flight control was achieved by wing warping.

In addition to the french, 2 British squadrons flew Morane-Saulnier N’s where it was nicknamed the “Bullet” due to th large spinner fitted on the nose.

The tactical, technological and training differences between Germany and the allied forces, ensured the British suffered a casualty rate nearly four times as great as their opponents. The losses were so disastrous that it threatened to undermine the morale of entire squadrons.
Royal Flying Corps (RFC) pilot training was often cursory, especially in the early days of the war. Many recruits had only 2 to 3 hours of flying instruction before being expected to fly solo. Men were often sent to France having logged only 15 hours in the air. 8000 young men died in Britain during flight training, which means that more died from accidents and equipment failures than from enemy action.

Most RFC pilots lasted only an average of about 3 weeks once they arrived at the Western Front. Those who weren’t killed, wounded, or taken prisoner might be posted out because of “nerves”. Flying was extremely stressful and dangerous. Those who lived through the first few weeks acquired skills that helped them live longer or even survive the war.
RFC pilots were not allowed to use parachutes, although the men who were up in observation balloons had them and often used them to escape an attack. Towards the end of the war, German pilots were using parachutes.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

WWI – British


The War Poets

“Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.”

Extract from ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen

“Poetry, more than any other art form, can capture a moment and preserve it forever. Centuries on, poems allow us to understand what people in the past were feeling, and lets us feel it for ourselves”, writes the producer and director Sebastian Barfield. This is no truer than the poetry written about the Great War. In fact the term ‘war poet’ immediately makes one think of the poems written about that conflict, more than any other conflict in history

In Poets’ Corner in the South Transept of Westminster Abbey in London, there is a slate stone slab commemorating the Great War Poets. There are sixteen names inscribed on it, all of whom served in uniform during the war. Of these sixteen poets, six died in the war.
Although the conflict started over a hundred years ago, reading poems by these poets, such as ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen, ‘Two Fusiliers’ by Robert Graves, Rupert Brooke’s sonnet ‘V. The Soldier’, ‘The General’ by Siegfried Sassoon or countless others, it is easy to imagine oneself there, experiencing the war first hand. Taken all together, these poems, many of them written in the trenches, create an extraordinary kind of witness – harrowing as well as humbling and heartening; they present the war as a devastating moment in history, and remind us its resonances never end.
So, it is not too difficult to picture a helmeted Tommy sitting on a battered crate, paper in one hand, pen poised in the other…….


Royal Garrison Artillery Crew



British Forces

French Army


The use of horses in World War I marked a transitional period in the evolution of armed conflict. Cavalry units were initially considered essential offensive elements of a military force, but over the course of the war, the vulnerability of horses to modern machine gun and artillery fire reduced their utility on the battlefield. This paralleled the development of tanks, which would ultimately replace cavalry in shock tactics. While the perceived value of the horse in war changed dramatically, horses still played a significant role throughout the war.

The military mainly used horses for logistical support during the war; they were better than mechanized vehicles at traveling through deep mud and over rough terrain. Horses were used for reconnaissance and for carrying messengers, as well as pulling artillery, ambulances, and supply wagons. The presence of horses often increased morale among the soldiers at the front, but the animals contributed to disease and poor sanitation in camps, caused by their manure and carcasses. The value of horses, and the increasing difficulty of replacing them, was such that by 1917 some troops were told that the loss of a horse was of greater tactical concern than the loss of a human soldier. Ultimately, the Allied blockade prevented the Central Powers from importing horses to replace those lost, which contributed to Germany’s defeat. By the end of the war, even the well-supplied U.S. Army was short of horses.



French Army

Australian Imperial Force


The Stokes mortar was a British trench mortar invented by Sir Wilfred Stokes KBE that was issued to the British, Commonwealth and U.S. armies, as well as the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps (CEP), during the later half of the First World War. The 3-inch trench mortar is a smooth-bore, muzzle-loading weapon for high angles of fire

The Stokes mortar was a simple weapon, consisting of a smoothbore metal tube fixed to a base plate (to absorb recoil) with a lightweight bipod mount. When a mortar bomb was dropped into the tube, an impact sensitive primer in the base of the bomb would make contact with a firing pin at the base of the tube, and detonate, firing the bomb towards the target.

The barrel is a seamless drawn-steel tube necked down at the breech or base end. To the breech end is fitted a base cap, within which is secured a firing pin protruding into the barrel. The caps at each end of the bomb cylinder were 81 mm diameter. The bomb was fitted with a modified hand grenade fuze on the front, with a perforated tube containing a propellant charge and an impact-sensitive cap at the rear.

Range was determined by the amount of propellant charge used and the angle of the barrel. A basic propellant cartridge was used for all firing, and covered short ranges. Up to four additional “rings” of propellant were used for incrementally greater ranges. See range tables below. The four rings were supplied with the cartridge and gunners discarded the rings which were not needed.

British Empire units had 1,636 Stokes mortars in service on the Western Front at the Armistice.

In World War I, the Stokes Mortar could fire as many as 25 bombs per minute and had a maximum range of 800 yards firing the original cylindrical unstabilised projectile. By World War II, it could fire as many as 30 bombs per minute, and had a range of over 2,500 yards with some shell types



Australian Imperial Force

Battle of Gallipoli 1915




Battle of Gallipoli 1915

New Star Trek Diecast Model Releases For December!

Sunday, September 20th, 2015

Star Trek Diecast Models


New Additions for December Release!


Star Trek

New First Legion October Releases!

Sunday, September 20th, 2015

Roman Imperial Cavalry


Formed of regiments of non-Citizen Auxiliaries recruited from the provinces, these cavalry were professional soldiers paid by the Roman state. We have presented here 8 different figures of the Ala II Flavia, heavily armored in mail and armed with spears, javelins and swords.



Roman Imperial Cavalry

WWII – Stalingrad Germans




Stalingrad Germans

WWII – Stalingrad Russians




Stalingrad Russians

New Britain’s Fall / Winter Releases

Sunday, September 20th, 2015

Wrath of the Norseman


On the 8th of June 793, Viking long ships appeared off the Northeast coast of England in Northumberland to raid the abbey on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne. In a short period of time, the abbey and surrounding village was destroyed with many of the Monks falling victim to the “wolves from the sea.” Those that were not killed were carried away as slaves along with the church treasures.



Wrath of the Norseman

Regiments Classic Collection – Gloss Finish


The British 10th Light Dragoons at the end of the Eighteenth Century. Originally raised in 1715 as Humphrey Gore’s Regiment of Dragoons, in 1782 George, Prince
of Wales, was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Tenth Light Dragoons. In 1793, the regiment was retitled 10th Light Dragoons ‘The Prince of Wales’ Own.’ His
pride in the Dragoons was such that in 1793 he spent his thirty-first birthday with the regiment, then encamped at Brighton. Look for additions to this
collection later this year.



Regiments Classic Collection

Clash of Empires




Clash of Empires

Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection




Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection

Battle of Waterloo, 1815



Battle of Waterloo, 1815

Battle of the Somme




Battle of the Somme

WWII Collection


New Series of WWII Figures.



WWII Collection

Zulu Wars



Zulu Wars

New Thomas Gunn October Releases!

Sunday, September 20th, 2015

WWII Pacific


New Releases Expected in October!



WWII Pacific

Home Front


A new Civilian series that should offer a lot of flexibility for collectors. This series will encompass a whole range of Civilians from Waitresses to Policemen as
well as Ladies of the night! This series will replace the Naughty Forties which we found to be too restrictive in its theme and as such any future NF series of
figures will be absorbed into the Home Front series from now on.


Home Front

WWI


Lufbery was born to an American father and French mother in 1885. His mother died when he was only 1 years old, his father went back to the USA leaving
Lufbery in the care of his French grandparents. Lufbery ran away at aged 17 years old and enlisted in the US Army before ending up in the Foreign Legion by
the time WW1 commenced. Lufbery requested a transfer to the air service and was accepted for pilot training at the end of 1914. In 1916 Lufbery transferred to
the Lafayette Escadrille which had recently formed with a core of American volunteer pilots, he quickly started totting up his aerial victories and in 1917
was commissioned into the United States Air Service with the rank of Major. In May 1917 Lufbery took off to intercept a Rumpler but was seen to fall out of his
aircraft between 200 to 600 feet, as he hit the ground he was impaled on metal railings which along with fall killed him immediately. It has since been claimed
that Lufbery had unclipped his seatbelt to clear a blockage in his machine gun, however when his plane unexpectedly flipped over he was ejected to his death.
Lufbery died with at least 17 confirmed kills and was enshrined in the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1988. Our sculpt of Lufbery shows him with 2 Lion Cub
(Whiskey & Soda) which were the unofficial mascots of the Lafayette Escadrille. Whiskey was particularly fond of Lufbery and would follow him around like a dog!



World War One

French Foreign Legion




French Foreign Legion

French & Indian Wars




French & Indian Wars

Britain’s New Arrivals For September!

Saturday, September 12th, 2015

Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection


 Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection

Clash of Empires


 Clash of Empires

Battle of Waterloo, 1815


 Battle of Waterloo, 1815

Rorke’s Drift



Rorke’s Drift – Matte Version

Battle of the Somme


 Battle of the Somme


King & Country September 2015 Releases!

Saturday, September 12th, 2015

Pike & Musket


A set of 3 x “Royalist” Musketeers in different attitudes preparing to fire their weapons.

English Civil War – Pike & Musket

Napoleonic – French 7th Hussars


As everyone knows the life of a soldier is not all battles and bloodshed…Most soldiers spend most of their time before or after a conflict relaxing and enjoying each other’s companionship. Here are some examples…

  • NA306 — Rest & Recuperation – As one 7th Hussar relates how he was wounded his fellow Hussar quietly enjoys his pipe.
  • NA313 — Rest & Refreshment – Seated at a table with a plate of cheese before them this pair of 7th Hussars slake their thirst with some local wine.
  • NA315 — Mounted Hussar – Turning in the saddle this 7th Hussar is about to go on picket duty.
  • NA348 — The Maid – This comely wench is checking to see whether the two gentlemen from NA315 need their wine “topped-up”.



French 7th Hussars

World of Dickens


A small additional selection of figures to fill out your Dickens Street scene…/p>

  • WoD026 — The Old Organ Grinder & his Monkey – A familiar sight on any Victorian Street was the itinerant “Organ Grinder” usually accompanied by an animal of one kind or another…In this case a small monkey. Our “Organ Grinder” is obviously an “Old Soldier” probably from the “Wars of Napoleon” and still
    wears the remains of his old uniform and even a campaign medal or two.
  • WoD027 — Isambard Kingdom Brunel – One of the great civil and mechanical engineering geniuses of the Victorian age…He designed Steam Ships…Suspension Bridges…Railways…Tunnels and much more. His designs transformed Britain and revolutionized public transport and modern engineering. Here he stands proud and confident…A great Victorian.
  • WoD028 — Mother & Child – A loving mother and her babe-in-arms.
  • WoD029 — Mr. Phineas Wagstaff – A gentleman of some wealth and position enjoying his morning stroll.
  • WoD032 — “Please sir, can I have more..?” – A plaintiff (and hungry) young Oliver Twist holds his bowl before him and requests a little extra sustenance. One of Dickens’ most famous characters.

World of Dickens

Fields of Battle


  • FoB101 — One Old Man & His Dog – It wasn’t only people that lose their homes in wartime… Here, this old civilian has only the clothes he stands up in and…his little dog which he is carrying in a cardboard box…At least the dog has some shelter. Another poignant little addition to our series of civilian refugees of war.



Fields of Battle

Red Army Resurgent


  • RA071 — The Souvenir Collector – All armies, given the opportunity, will loot when and where possible. Here, a Russian officer holds his machine pistol in one hand and carries off a bust of the Führer as a small momento of the battle.
  • RA072 — Kneeling Reloading – A kneeling Red Army private reaches into his pouch for a fresh magazine for his Ppsh 41 machine gun.
  • RA073 — Attack! – As one Russian soldier urges his Comrades forward into the assault his comrade provides covering fire.
  • RA074 — Female Fighter – One of the Red Army’s women fighters replenishes her magazine.


Russian Front and Berlin 1945

Operation Market Garden


  • MG059(P) — Lt. Jimmy Cleminson – Lt. Cleminson was in charge of No.5 Platoon of “B” Company, 3 Para during the Arnhem operation. As he led his platoon forward a German Citroen Staff Car suddenly appeared at a road junction. He and his men opened fire riddling the vehicle and killing all its occupants including a German General…Only later did he discover that the senior officer was none other than the German commander of the Arnhem area…General Friedrich Kussin! * See later notes…
  • MG061(P) — “Sergeant Jim Sharrock” Glider Pilot Regiment– Sergeant Sharrock flew to Arnhem piloting a Hamilcar glider carrying a 17 pounder gun of the 1st Air landing Auti Tank Battery…He was killed in action on 22 September and, alas, has no known grave. Our figure depicts him just after he landed still wearing his flying helmet and carrying a map and his Browning automatic.
  • MG062(P) — The Ambushers – Two of General Kussin’s opponents from No.5 Platoon have a “smoke-break” after their successful ambush.

Operation Market Garden

Welbike Set


This is normally only available from KC. But for our customers who would like to add this to their order, let us know and we will be pleased to supply it to you in our store or in your shipment.
Unfortunately we will not be listing it on our web site.

  • MG065X “The Welbike Set” – Several thousand of these miniature air-portable motorcycles were manufactured during the war and some were parachuted into
    Arnhem. Here our Para has halted his bike and unslung his Sten Gun…ready for action.


To order just contact us and reference “MG065X” and we will take care of the rest.

*ARNHEM AMBUSH PREVIEW”


Although not available until October here is a “Sneak Peak” at “General Kussin’s Ambushed Citroen”

  • WH044 – The set includes the bullet riddled Citroen Staff Car with the dead body of the German General lying half-in…half-out of the vehicle. Sitting slumped in the driver’s seat is his unfortunate driver.
  • WH045 “Dead German General’s ADC” – To accompany the above set is a separate dead German Staff Officer who managed to escape from the ambushed vehicle…but did not get very far before being cut down.

The Battle of Britain


  • RAF071 — “The Aston Martin “Ulster” (Fire Engine Red) – By their very own description fighter pilots love all kinds of speed…And many of them even had their own sports cars. A favorite of some of the wealthier ones was the Aston Martin “Ulster” which had taken part in the famous Le Mans races in the years before the war. This particular “fire engine red” racer has its proud pilot/owner behind the wheel.
  • RAF072 — Air Vice Marshal Sir Keith Park – This tall New Zealander was a WW1 Flying Ace who remained in the Royal Air Force after 1918. At the time of the Battle of Britain, in the summer of 1940, he was in command of No.11 Group RAF tasked with the fighter defence of London and South East England. A firm supporter of Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, he won a reputation as a shrewd tactician and a popular “hands-on” leader who often flew his own personal Hurricane around his widely dispersed airfields to talk with and listen to his squadron commanders and pilots.
    Our figure shows him in flying gear about to take off on one of his regular tours of his fighter airfields.
  • RAF073 — Squadron Leader Bob Stanford-Tuck – Stanford-Tuck joined the RAF in 1935. He first saw combat during the Fall of France over Dunkirk and went on to become an “ace” several times over during the Battle of Britain. He was shot down over France in January 1942 when his tally of “kills” numbered 27 and 2 shared.He survived imprisonment in the infamous Colditz and the war and enjoyed a successful career postwar during which he even became a friend of his old opponent, Adolf Galland.
  • RAF074 — “The Aston Martin “Ulster” (Sky Blue)


Royal Airforce

Retreat to Dunkirk


  • FoB118 — Morris CS9 Armoured Car – A “classic” early war British armoured car utilizing the chassis of the Morris Commercial C9 truck. On this chassis was mounted a riveted hull and an open-topped turret. Armament consisted on a “Boys” anti-tank rifle and a Bren Gun.Our model is in the markings of the 12th Royal Lancers during the Battle of France in 1940 and comes with a vehicle commander figure.
  • FoB119 — “Walking Wounded” – A British “Tommy” helps his wounded mate along the road towards the beaches of Dunkirk…and hopefully home to dear old “Blighty”.
  • FoB123 — Rear guard Trio – While some blokes get the opportunity to retreat others have to stay back and hold up the advancing Germans. These three “Tommies” prepare for battle.
  • FoB124 — Truck Passengers – Two other “Toms” take the weight off their feet and have a moment’s rest. They’re been on the road for days now and deserve a break! Both figures and the separate boxes they sit on fit perfectly into K&C’s
    own Morris CS8 truck (FOB091) or, as you see here, can sit next to a road or a building.
  • FoB125 — “Knackened!” – The urban definition of that particularly English word “Knackered” means “completely worn-out” or “physically exhausted”. It is in most common usage in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and New Founland.
    Our British “Tommy” here is sitting down by the roadway or perhaps in the back of the truck…but the description is still appropriate.



Fields of Battle