Archive for the ‘John Jenkins’ Category

New John Jenkins March Releases

Sunday, February 19th, 2017

War of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Provincial Regiments




Provincial Regiments 1759

10th Anniversery Sets


These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of MARCH or until stock runs out.



Provincial Regiments 1759

French Militia




French Militia 1759

Peninsular War 1807-1814


Baron Dominique Jean Larrey served as Surgeon-in-chief of the French Napoleonic armies from Italy in 1797 to Waterloo in 1815. During this time, he implemented the modern method of having an Army Surgery, field hospitals and a system of ambulances. After he had seen the speed with which the carriages of the French artillery managed to maneuver around the battlefields, Larrey adapted a similar system of Ambulances for rapid transportation of the wounded, and also manned them with trained crews of drivers, and litter bearers.

Larrey also increased the mobility and improved the organization of field hospitals, effectively creating a forerunner of the modern MASH units. He established a rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the seriousness of their injuries and urgency of need for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality. Soldiers of enemy armies, as well as those of the French and their allies, were treated.



Peninsular War 1807-1814

Knights of the Skies


The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918.
In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft. The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.

This aircraft was flown by Wilhelm Leusch and featured a fire breathing dragon on the fuselage inspired by an Unterberg & Helme company advertisement.
Leusch was made commander of Jasta 19 in October 1918 and scored 5 victories. He was only 29 when he died in a glider accident in August 1921.

Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel 19 was founded on 25th October 1916, and was designated a “Hunting Group”, (i.e. a fighter squadron)
It flew its first combat patrols five days before Christmas, 1916. The new Jasta drew first blood on 6 April 1917, credit being given to Leutnant Walter Böning. On 2 February 1918, Jasta 19 was detailed into Jagdgeschwader II along with Jasta 12, Jasta 13, and Jasta 15.

The unit would score 92 verified aerial victories, including ten wins over enemy observation balloons. In turn, their casualties for the war would amount to eleven pilots killed in action, four wounded in action, and one taken prisoner of war.
Jasta 19 commander, Lt. Oliver von Beaulieu-Marconnay, was killed in action and superceded by Ltn R Wilhelm Leusch in October 1918. He led Jasta 19 until the end of the war, while the unit was based in Trier.

The overall paint scheme is typical of Jasta 19 markings, when the yellow nose was representative, while the blue fuselage was the Jagdgeschwader II marking. Jagdgeswader II units were Jasta 12 with a white nose, Jasta 13 with a green nose, Jasta 15 with a red nose and the already noted yellow nose of Jasta 19.


At the outbreak of hostilities in August 1914 Crossley Motors moved almost totally to war production. The only model made was the 20/25 which was supplied to the forces in huge numbers with production running at up to 45 a week. The first had been supplied to the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) in 1913 and at the outbreak of war they had 56. By the time of the armistice this had risen to over 6000.
Every squadron in the RFC was supposed to be equipped with nine Tenders and one Staff Touring Car but it seems likely that most never had the full complement. Vehicles went to France, Belgium, Mesopotamia, Salonica, Egypt, Russia, India and several parts of Africa.

The 34 cwt Tender had room for eleven men, three in front with the remainder facing each other on bench seats down each side of the rear. Weather protection was by two hoods, one for the front and one for the rear.

After the war the 20/25 continued in use by the RAF for several years and saw service in Iraq, Persia and India. The 20/25 model was also the first vehicle to be supplied to London’s Metropolitan Police Flying Squad in 1920, some of which were fitted with radio equipment.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

New John Jenkins February Releases!

Saturday, January 21st, 2017

Wars of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

JJDesigns 10th Anniversary
Battle of the Plains of Abraham


These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of FEBRUARY, or until stock runs out.



Battle of the Plains of Abraham

Raid on Saint Francis


The Religion, Ceremonies and Beliefs of the Eastern woodland Indian tribes were based on Animism. Animism was a commonly shared doctrine, or belief, of the indigenous people of North America and Canada including the Woodland Indian tribes. Animism is based on the spiritual or religious idea that the universe and all natural objects have souls or spirits. In this religion it is believed that souls or spirits exist not only in humans but also in animals, plants, trees, rocks etc. This belief is also extended to natural phenomena such as thunder storms and rain and geographic features such as mountains, caves or rivers also possess souls or spirits.

There were various ceremonies and festivals relating to the corn crops including the Green Corn festival. These ceremonies and festivals included feasting and music using rattles and drums.

The STOMP Dance is an example of a dance performed by various Eastern Woodland tribes and Native American communities. The term “Stomp Dance” is an English term, which refers to the “shuffle and stomp” movements of the dance.

There were several other ceremonies which were important to the Woodland Indians. Notably the Cry Ceremony. When someone in a Woodland tribe died, the tribe would hold a cry ceremony. To prepare for the ceremony five knots were tied in a piece of milkweed. Milkweed was abundant in the longleaf pine forests and were plants with milky sap and light wind-blown seeds. The chief of the tribe performed dances and sang around a fire. The ceremony lasted five days and on each day one of the knots would be untied.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

French Militia




French Militia 1759

Jacobite Rebellion




Jacobite Rebellion 1745

New John Jenkins February Releases!

Saturday, January 21st, 2017

Peninsular War


Caçadores was Portuguese for “huntsmen”, these were the elite light infantry of the Portuguese Army during the Peninsular War. They were referred by Lord Wellington, as the “fighting cocks” of his Anglo-Portuguese Army.

One of the most distinctive features of the Caçadores was their famous brown uniform . The brown uniform was chosen as a form of camouflage, considered more appropriate to the dry lands of the Iberian Peninsula than the traditional green uniforms used by the light infantry of most other countries in Europe.

During the Peninsular War, Caçadores became especially notable in the performance of marksmanship at long distances.

1st and 3rd Cazadores had the highest level of training. They were indoctrinated with British battalions and formed part of the famous “Light Division” of Major General Robert “Black Bob” Craufurd.

Both battalions are unquestionably the most famous Portuguese battalions. They were trained by British officers and were the equivalent of the 95th rifles.

**PLEASE NOTE, AS THE NEWER SETS WILL BE PAINTED WITH BROWN AND WHITE TROUSERS, THESE 3 SETS ARE RE_PAINTS OF THE OLDER SETS**



Peninsular War 1807-1814

Sudan War




First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

Knights Of The Skies


Hans-Joachim Buddecke (22 August 1890 – 10 March 1918) was a German flying ace in World War I, credited with thirteen victories. He was the third ace, after Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke, to earn the Blue Max (Pour le Mérite). He saw combat in three theaters during the First World War: Bulgaria, Turkey, and the Western Front

**More pilots and groundcrew sets will be on their way over the next few months.**



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

WWI – French


The French St. Étienne Mle 1907 (French: Mitrailleuse Mle 1907 T) was a gas operated air-cooled machine gun in 8mm Lebel which was widely used in the early years of the First World War. The “St.Etienne Mle 1907” was not derived from the Hotchkiss machine gun. Instead it was an entirely different gas operated blow-forward design borrowed from the semi-automatic Bang rifle of 1903. This Bang system was first transposed in 1905 to the French Puteaux APX Machine Gun which soon proved to be unsatisfactory. Then, two years later, the Mle 1907 “St-Etienne” machine gun followed as an improved redesign of the “Puteaux” machine gun. However the Mle 1907 “Saint Etienne” was only a partial redesign : the original blow-forward gas piston, rack-and-pinion system, and bolt mechanism of the Mle 1905 ” Puteaux” machine gun had all been kept only slightly modified inside the newer weapon. Eventually a total of over 39,700 “St-Etienne” Mle 1907 machine guns were manufactured between 1908 and late 1917. They were widely used by French infantry during the early part of World War I until their replacement by the distinctly more reliable Hotchkiss M1914 machine-gun.



French Army

JJDesigns 10th Anniversary


The 10th ANNIVERSARY celebrations will be coming to an end in MAY!

To start the second decade of jjDesigns, I am pleased to announce there will be several exciting new series to come throughout 2017. One of which ”The Armies And Enemies Of Ancient Rome”, will be a collaboration between jjD and K&C.

New John Jenkins January Releases!

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

Knights of the Skies


The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918.

In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft.

The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.

Carl “Charly” Degelow (5 January 1891 – 9 November 1970) Pour le Merite, Royal House Order of Hohenzollern, Iron Cross, was a German fighter pilot during World War I. He was credited with 30 victories, and was the last person to win the military Pour le Merite.

The fuselage of Carl Degelow’s early production Albatros built Fokker DVII features the white stag logo of “Dr. Lahmann’s Sanatorium” in Dresden, where Degelow had spent time recuperating from an arm wound he received in 1915 while serving in the infantry.

To find out more about Carl Degelow, the book “BLACK FOKKER LEADER” by Peter Kilduff, is highly recommended.


Otto Kissenberth (26 February 1893 – 2 August 1919) was a German flying ace of World War I credited with 20 aerial victories. He was a prewar mechanical engineer who joined the German air service in 1914. After being trained and after serving as a reconnaissance pilot, he became one of the first German fighter pilots, flying with Kampfeinsitzerkommando (Combat Single-Seater Command) KEK Einsisheim. He scored six victories with this unit as it morphed into a fighter squadron, Jagdstaffel 16. His success brought him command of Jagdstaffel 23 on 4 August 1917. He would run his victory tally to 20, downing his final victim using a captured British Sopwith Camel on 20 May 1918. Nine days later, a crash while flying the Camel ended Kissenberth’s combat career. His injuries were severe enough he was not returned to combat, instead being assigned to command Schleissheim’s flying school. Although Otto Kissenberth survived the war, he died soon after in a mountaineering accident on 2 August 1919.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

WWI – French Army




French Army

Raid on St Francis


The militia/frontiersman spirit derives from an early American dependence on arms to protect themselves from foreign armies and hostile Native Americans. Survival depended upon everyone being capable of using a weapon.

Prior to the American Revolution there was neither budget nor manpower nor government desire to maintain a full-time army. Therefore, the armed citizen-soldier carried the responsibility. Service in militia, including providing one’s own ammunition and weapons, was mandatory for all men.

Firearms therefore played a vital role in American settlement and expansion, therefore American women were no stranger to their use, and even competent in the manufacture and repair of weapons.

Both the necessity to hunt and the need for protection from the sometimes hostile native culture, made the use of firearms a crucial component in the settlement of America.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

French Militia




French Militia 1759

New John Jenkins January Releases!

Monday, December 26th, 2016

Jacobite Rebellion


The Royal Ecossais was raised by John Drummond in 1744 and disbanded 1763.

Their organisation was to be based on that of the Irish regiments ,to be made up of 11 companies of fusiliers and 1 of grenadiers each of 50 men plus officers for a total of 660 effectives. The officers and men used to form the regiment came from several different sources, firstly from Scotsmen serving in the Irish regiments, Scottish exiles living in France together with recruits smuggled out of Scotland. With an effective of 500 men and officers assembled at St.Omer, with John Lord Drummond as lieutenant colonel, (as for all Royal Regiments, the King of France was always the colonel ) although Lord Drummond wrote on the 29th December 1744 that he was missing only 10 men to complete the regiment.

This regiment, as many other foreign regiments in tjhe French Army were not mercenaries as is often claimed, they were more often than not political or religious refugees who could not safely return to their homeland for fear of persecution.

The regiment had a strength of 350 men at the Battle of Culloden on the16th of April 1746 were they were in the second line and later they helped to cover the retreat of the Highlanders right wing, an attempt by Argyll Militia to interfere was pushed aside but in the skirmish the two battalions became separated and one , probably the 2nd battalion, was caught and surrounded by British Dragoons and forced to surrender in Inverness, the other one, together with their colours continued its retreat towards Ruthven Barracks and did not surrender until the 19th of April.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Seven Years War


The Roth Wurzberg Infantry were mercenary troops in Austrian service.

The regiment was raised in 1757 from troops from the three existing Wurzburg infantry regiments.



Battle of Leuthen 1757 – Seven Years War

War of the Roses


In an effort to destroy Henry Tudor, Richard decided to leave his position on Ambion Hill, leading his household retainers down the slope, thundering towards Henry’s men with levelled lances.

A few of the key personalities involved in King Richard’s heroic last charge will be available in the summer.

King Richard III and his standard bearer, Sir Percival Thirlwall, charge towards Henry Tudor and his standard bearer William Brandon.

King Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death in 1485, at the age of 32, in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages in England.

When his brother King Edward IV died in April 1483, Richard was named Lord Protector of the realm for Edward’s son and successor, the 12-year-old Edward V. As the young king travelled to London from Ludlow, Richard met and escorted him to lodgings in the Tower of London, where Edward V’s own brother Richard of Shrewsbury joined him shortly afterwards. Arrangements were made for Edward’s coronation on 22 June 1483; but, before the young king could be crowned, his father’s marriage to his mother Elizabeth Woodville was declared invalid, making their children illegitimate and ineligible for the throne. On 25 June, an assembly of Lords and commoners endorsed the claims. The following day, Richard III began his reign, and he was crowned on 6 July 1483. The young princes were not seen in public after August, and accusations circulated that the boys had been murdered on Richard’s orders, giving rise to the legend of the Princes in the Tower.

There were two major rebellions against Richard. The first, in October 1483, was led by staunch allies of Edward IV and Richard’s former ally, Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham; but the revolt collapsed. In August 1485, Henry Tudor and his uncle, Jasper Tudor, led a second rebellion. Henry Tudor landed in southern Wales with a small contingent of French troops and marched through his birthplace, Pembrokeshire, recruiting soldiers. Henry’s force engaged Richard’s army and defeated it at the Battle of Bosworth Field in Leicestershire. Richard was struck down in the conflict, making him the last English king to die in battle on home soil and the first since Harold II was killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Henry then ascended to the throne as Henry VII.

After the battle Richard’s corpse was taken to Leicester and buried without pomp. His original tomb monument is believed to have been removed during the Reformation, and his remains were lost for more than five centuries, believed to have been thrown into the River Soar. In 2012, an archaeological excavation was commissioned by the Richard III Society on a city council car park on the site once occupied by Greyfriars Priory Church.The University of Leicester identified the skeleton found in the excavation as that of Richard III as a result of radiocarbon dating, comparison with contemporary reports of his appearance, and comparison of his mitochondrial DNA with that of two matrilineal descendants of Richard III’s eldest sister, Anne of York. Richard’s remains were reburied in Leicester Cathedral on 26 March 2015.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

jjDESIGNS 10th ANNIVERSARY


It has been pointed out by many collectors that the 10th Anniversary Celebrations should continue until April 2017!

Therefore for JANUARY we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with THREE more “BOOSTER/STARTER” Sets!

These sets will only be offered for sale to dealers until the end of JANUARY, or until stock runs out.



First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

Seven Years War




Battle of Leuthen 1757 – Seven Years War

New John Jenkins December Releases!

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

Knights Of The Skies


The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918.
In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft.
The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.

Ernst Udet (26 April 1896 – 17 November 1941) was the second-highest scoring German flying ace of World War I. He was one of the youngest aces and was the highest scoring German ace to survive the war (at the age of 22).
His 62 confirmed victories were second only to Manfred von Richthofen, his commander in the Flying Circus. Udet rose to become a squadron commander under Richthofen, and later under Hermann Göring.

The D-VII entered squadron service about the time Udet took over Jasta 4. It was easier to handle than contemporary enemy aircraft and performed well compared to them, and it did not have the Albatros’ tendency to have the wings rip off in a hard dive.


During the spring and early summer of early 1918, Udet’s score rose to 35. The charmed life of this German Ace was again apparent when he took off on the morning of June 29 to intercept a French Bréguet two-seater, which was directing artillery fire over the lines. A few days before, in a fit of arrogance and impertinence, Udet had had his Fokker painted with a candy-striped upper wing and a red fuselage with ‘Lo’–the nickname of his girlfriend Lola Zink–written on it in big white letters. On the tail was the phrase, ‘Du doch nicht!‘ (‘Certainly not you!’), a taunt and challenge to Allied pilots.

Udet approached the Bréguet with great skill and precision. He fired at the observer, who sank into his cockpit. Now Udet casually swung around for a side shot at the helpless Bréguet, targeting the engine and pilot. Suddenly the observer sprang up and manned his machine gun, sending a blistering spray of bullets into Udet’s Fokker, damaging his machine gun and gas tank and shredding the controls. Udet reared away but soon found that his plane was crippled–it would only fly in circles.

By accelerating whenever he pointed eastward, Udet slowly began working his way back to the German lines.

Suddenly the Fokker nosed down into a spin from which Udet could not pull out. He was wearing one of the new Heinecke parachutes that German pilots were just being equipped with, and he stood up in the cockpit to jump. As he did so, a rush of wind knocked him backward. But instead of tumbling into the wide-open sky, Udet to his horror realized that his parachute harness was caught on the rudder. Frantically, he struggled with the harness as the earth spun closer. With a final superhuman effort he yanked himself free and floated down into no man’s land. He quickly scrambled back to the German lines and, taking his harrowing experience in stride, was flying again that same afternoon. The next day he shot down a Spad fighter for his 36th victory.

There is some controversy as to exactly how Udets “Candy Striped” D.VII was painted. This stems from the fact that only one photo is known of this specific plane and it doesn’t show the whole aircraft.

The wing stripes are traditionally depicted as red and white, but black and white stripes are also depicted, believed to have been inspired by Udet’s earlier experiences with Kirschtein’s simularily striped DR1.

Therefore 2 versions of this iconic plane have been produced.


A Nissen hut is a prefabricated steel structure, made from a half-cylindrical skin of corrugated steel. Originally designed during World War I by engineer and inventor Major Peter Norman Nissen. It was also used extensively during World War II.

The Nissen hut was put into production in August 1916. At least 100,000 were produced in World War I.

The Germans also used Nissen huts at their airfields. They were known to be painted black.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

American Expeditionary Forces




American Expeditionary Forces

French Army




French Army

Egypt 1915


**PLEASE NOTE A THIRD ROLLS ROYCE ARMOURED CAR IS IN DEVELOPEMNET, AND HOPEFULLY WILL BE AVAILABLE IN 2017**



Egypt 1915

New John Jenkins December Releases!

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

Wars of the Roses 1455-1487


The brutal style of the medieval long sword is one of power and practical efficiency, but one with an artistry all its own. Methodical and practical methods for skillfully using the weapon were practiced for centuries and have survived in manuals from the era.
For the medieval long sword there are essentially 14 recognizable and legitimate fighting postures. They are all guards or “wards” from which to launch an attack or to parry.
There were 5 major stances or guards which were the most popular, the others were considered “secondary” guards or transitional stances , which were primarily parry positions used either for recovery to another guard or for a particular attack or parry.
YORK-21 Knight is sculpted in one of the 5 primary positions, using the “Hanging Right Guard”.

And is countered by LANC-22 using the “Hanging Left Guard”.

Two more medieval Knights in traditional long sword guards will be available in the next few months.




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Battle of Monongahela, 1755




Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Battle on Snowshoes


10th Anniversary celebrations, only available until December 31st or when stock runs out.



Battle on Snowshoes

French Militia 1759




French Militia 1759

Peninsular War 1807-1814


10th Anniversary celebrations, only available until December 31st or when stock runs out.



Peninsular War 1807-1814

New John Jenkins November Releases!

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

KNIGHTS OF THE SKIES


The SPAD S.XIII was a French biplane fighter aircraft of World War I, developed by Société Pour L’Aviation et ses Dérivés (SPAD) from the earlier highly successful SPAD S.VII. It was one of the most capable fighters of the war, and one of the most-produced, with 8,472 built and orders for around 10,000 more cancelled at the armistice.

Georges Félix Madon (July 28, 1892 – November 11, 1924) was the fourth ranked French ace pilot of the First World War.
Madon was born in Bizerte, Tunisia and was athletic from an early age. He was short but had an erect stance, and was exceptionally strong. He boxed and played football. His desire to fly led him to attempt to become a pilot for the Ottoman Empire. When that failed, he enlisted in the First Engineering Regiment in Versailles, and ended up as a cook.

He repeatedly requested pilot’s training.

Madon was initially assigned to Escadrille BL30, where he flew reconnaissance missions in Bleriots. He also flew some of the first night-time bombing missions of the war. Madon was already a very experienced pilot, and this served him well when he was hit by a 77mm shell on October 30, 1914. He managed to perform a dead stick landing against the wind, but behind the French lines.
He was appointed to command Escadrille Spa38, which was re-equipped with new Spad XIIIs. Although principally a photo reconnaissance unit, Spa38 aggressively defended itself. They lived up to the motto they adopted from their commander: “Whoever rubs against me gets pricked”. They also adopted his black thistle insignia on their planes.

He mentored other pilots who became aces because of his tutelage; among these were Andre Martenot de Cordou, Hector Garaud, and American David Putnam.
By war’s end, he was credited with 41 confirmed victories and 64 probables. About the latter, he once nonchalantly remarked: “The Boche knows his losses.” His score of 41 still ranked him fourth among all French pilots
To make himself more easily identifiable to his men, G. F. Madon painted the fuselage and tail of his aircraft red. One of his SPAD XIII had an all-red fuselage and white radiator cowl.



**PLEASE NOTE THESE PILOTS WILL FIT ALL THE GERMAN PLANES**



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

American Expeditionary Forces


Mack AC “Bulldog” haulers are legendary workhorses. During their 20-plus years of production (1916-1939), they were employed in many heavy industries including logging, petroleum, construction, and nearly anywhere a rock-solid chassis cab was needed. They were available with up to a 7.5-ton load capacity. The U.S. military made extensive use of the AC during WWI. Many of them remained in the countries where they served and were put to use by civilians for decades afterward.

Mack delivered over 6,000 trucks, both to the United States and Britain’s military. A legend surfaced that British soldiers would call for Mack Bulldogs to be sent when facing adversity.

Mack Trucks, Inc., is an American truck–manufacturing company and a former manufacturer of buses and trolley buses. Founded in 1900 as the Mack Brothers Company, it manufactured its first truck in 1907 and adopted its present name in 1922.

In 1916 The Mack ACs are introduced and over 40,000 of these trucks were produced.



American Expeditionary Forces

WHEELS ACROSS THE DESERT



Egypt
1915

THE GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN 1915




Battle of Gallipoli 1915

THE FRENCH ARMY


Initially, Frances armed forces were designed to fight, fend for, and feed at a company or battalion level. This meant that soldiers who were line infantrymen might also be cooks, laborers, supply clerks and maintenance personnel, with fatigue details being assigned on a rotational basis between the non-specialists. In garrison, or on maneuvers, this worked splendidly. When the day’s work was done, the cooking detail would set up the kitchen area, cook and serve the meal, and everyone was happy.

For emergency use, troops carried an emergency ration, but no one would touch that except in old Legionnaires’ barroom tales of the Legion in ‘wild places’.


While the front lines were still somewhat flexible, field unit based kitchens were becoming less and less feasible. By the time the front froze at the trench line from the channel to the Swiss border, they had become impossible. Many troops would receive fresh ration supplies, but with the trench networks initially only being laid out for close-up combat, no provisions for regular cooking was made.

This meant that troops subsisted on fresh bread, fruit, wine and sausages. Iron rations were limited due to supply shortages, and generally the only warm meal happened if a section or a platoon managed to set up a makeshift kitchen to use the supplies arriving in an irregular fashion before they could spoil. Even then, the best troops could hope for was some sort of soup or stew, or a cup of coffee if they were not so lucky.

The Field ration consisting of an abbreviated menu and was the main ration type scheduled for troops. Traveling kitchens would set up in areas adjacent to the combat zone, and would prepare more-or-less edible and definitely not nutritionally balanced meals, which would then be hauled to the front lines. This detail of being a ‘soup man’ was considered to be a job more hazardous than combat infantryman, as you had to traverse ground generally covered by enemy pre-planned artillery fires, while carrying equipment that made it hard to seek cover, run or hide.

Food that did make it to the front was generally at least cold and of dubious quality, and often times soiled and near inedible, such as bread that was carried without wrappers of any kind, coffee (le jus) transported in open cans etc. Menus consisted of a variety of poorly prepared dishes, which include open rack roasted meats, previously salted (and mostly too salty) fish, various pâtés made of meat scraps, lard and vegetables, rice, and beans of every description, at times just cooked together in more or less edible stews. Luckily, along with these rations came (if at all possible) a serving of ‘pinard’, the cheap wine issued to all French forces. British troops lucky enough to get some eventually combined all French terms like pinard or vin blanc into the ubiquitous (and still current!) term ‘plonk’, describing any cheap wine.



French Army

THE RAID ON ST. FRANCIS 1959 FRENCH MILITIA




French Militia 1759

Lacrosse




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

THE WARS OF THE ROSES 1455-1487




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

jjDESIGNS 10th ANNIVERSARY




Battle of Monongahela, 1755

First Sudan War 1884 – 1885


MAKE SURE YOU PRE-ORDER YOUR SET BEFORE 31st DECEMBER 2016





First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

New Jenkins October Releases!

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Knights Of The Skies


The Sopwith Triplane was a British single seat fighter aircraft designed and manufactured by the Sopwith Aviation Company during the First World War. It was the first military triplane to see operational service. The Triplane joined Royal Naval Air Service squadrons in early 1917 and was immediately successful. It was nevertheless built in comparatively small numbers and was withdrawn from active service as Sopwith Camels arrived in the latter half of 1917.

The Triplane’s combat debut was highly successful. The new fighter’s exceptional rate of climb and high service ceiling gave it a marked advantage over the Albatros D.III, though the Triplane was slower in a dive. The Germans were so impressed by the performance of the Triplane that it spawned a brief triplane craze among German aircraft manufacturers, resulting in the successful Fokker DR1.

Pilots nicknamed the aircraft the Tripehound or simply the Tripe.

On July 27th 1917, Raymond Collishaw achieved 2 victories in this triplane, which was one of only six Triplanes armed with twin Vickers guns.

The Triplane was famously flown by No. 10 Naval Squadron’s “B” Flight, better known as “Black Flight.” This all-Canadian flight was commanded by the ace Raymond Collishaw. Their aircraft, named Black Maria, Black Prince, Black George, Black Death and Black Sheep, were distinguishable by their black-painted fins and cowlings.

Black Flight claimed 87 German aircraft in three months while equipped with the Triplane. Collishaw himself scored 34 of his eventual 60 victories in the aircraft, making him the top Triplane ace.

For a variety of reasons, the Triplane’s combat career was comparatively brief. In service, the Triplane proved difficult to repair. The fuel and oil tanks were inaccessible without substantial disassembly of the wings and fuselage. Even relatively minor repairs had to be made at rear echelon repair depots. Moreover, spare parts became difficult to obtain during the summer of 1917, and No. 1 Naval Squadron’s complement was reduced from 18 to 15 aircraft.

The Triplane also gained a reputation for structural weakness because the wings sometimes collapsed in steep dives. This defect was attributed to the use of light gauge bracing wires in the 46 aircraft built by subcontractor Clayton & Shuttleworth.

Another drawback of the Triplane was its light armament. While contemporary Albatros fighters were armed with two guns, most Triplanes were armed with a single synchronised Vickers machine gun. Efforts to fit twin guns to the Triplane met with mixed results. Clayton & Shuttleworth built six experimental Triplanes with twin guns.

The second new allied pilot set. The two allied pilots in set ACEBP03 are designed to fit all current allied planes. Unfortunately the new ACEBP-04 wounded pilots do not fit the new
ACE-30 Sopwith Triplane.


The second new allied pilot set. The two allied pilots in set ACEBP03 are designed to fit all current allied planes. Unfortunately the new ACEBP-04 wounded pilots do not fit the new
ACE-30 Sopwith Triplane.

A Hucks Starter is an auxiliary power unit, almost always a motortruck, that provides initial power to start up piston aircraft engines. Such Hucks starter trucks can be considered a mechanical replacement for a member of the groundcrew who would have spun an aircraft’s propeller by hand. This is because of the starter truck’s position in front of the airplane when starting, much like a groundcrew member, and were commonly used when aircraft engines became too large to be easily started by hand.

The power is transmitted to the aircraft via a power take-off shaft, much like those found on the drive trains of rear-wheel drive vehicles, or agricultural machines. The shaft of the starter fits into a special protruding hub incorporating a simple projecting claw clutch on the center of the airplane’s propeller assembly. When engaged, the power of the truck’s engine is transmitted to the aircraft engine until start up, whereupon the faster speed of the now-running engine disengages the clutch, and then the starter truck clears the area prior to take-off.

The device was named after its inventor Bentfield Hucks, who was a captain in the Royal Flying Corps at the time

In the Royal Air Force service, Hucks Starters were based on Ford Model T trucks, which were in widespread use and familiar to ground crew.

The Huck Starter with 2 crew. The crew figures will be available at a later date.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

First Sudan War


From 1855 what are now known as The Royal Marines, were labeled The Royal Marine Light Infantry. They were to mainly be used in a skirmishing capacity in front of infantry. They were issued gray wool coats and trousers. The foreign service helmets were not stained, but kept white in keeping with the pristine Marine turnout.

The marines were in Gen. Graham’s square at El Teb. At Tamai in 1884 they formed the rear wall of Maj. Davis’s 2nd Brigade square. When the wild Hadenodoa warriors flooded into the square through the gap left by the Black Watch. The rear rank of the marines were compelled to turnabout and fight in both directions. At this time the Marines acted as a breakwater to steady elements of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and the Black Watch as they recovered to retrieve the situation.

The Marines were to take part in most of the major actions throughout the Sudan Campaigns.



First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

French Militia 1759


For the campaign of 1759 the militia companies were amalgamated into 3 brigades by region of origin. They wore the knitted “tuque” or stocking cap typical of the French habitant, in different colours according to their brigade. Red was for Quebec, White for Trois Rivieres, and blue for Montreal.



French Militia 1759

Raid on Saint Francis




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Wars of the Roses




Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Battle of Monongahela




Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Peninsular War


For October we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with THREE more “BOOSTER/STARTER” Sets!

These sets will only be offered for sale to dealers until the end of NOVEMBER, or until stock runs out.



Peninsular War 1807-1814

Battle of Chippewa




Battle of Chippewa – War of 1812

John Jenkins September Releases!

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Battle of Monongahela, 1755


The first range produced by jjDesigns was The Battle on the Monongahela Series. This mainly consisted of the “luckless,” 44th Regiment of Foot.

The other British Line Regiment at Monongahela was the 48th Regiment of Foot.

The regiment was first raised in 1741 as James Cholmondeley’s Regiment of Foot in Norwich, England during the War of Austrian Succession.

The regiment first saw action at the Battles of Falkirk and Culloden in 1745-1746.

In 1748, it was renumbered as the 48th Regiment of Foot. The 48th took part in the French and Indian War, being part of General Edward Braddock’s ill-fated expedition of 1755.

They received their first battle honour in the Americas at the Battle of Louisburg, although the Regiment did not receive their due honour for this until 1882. The 48th was also part of General James Wolfe’s force at the capture of Quebec in 1759.

As a special 10th Anniversary Release, the 48th Regiment of Foot figures released in 2016, will be available at the original 2006 prices!



Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Jacobite Rebellion 1745


For SEPTEMBER we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with two more “BOOSTER/STARTER” Sets!

These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of October, or until stock runs out.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Speedbirds


The Thompson Trophy race was one of the National Air Races of the heyday of early airplane racing in the 1930s. Established in 1929, the last race was held in 1961. The race was 10 miles (16 km) long with 50-foot-high (15 m) pylons marking the turns, and emphasized low altitude flying and maneuverability at high speeds. As the race was flown around a closed course, crowds in the grandstands could easily see much of the spectacle.

There were two series of Thompson races. The first series followed the award of a “Thompson Cup” in the 1929 National Air Races to the winner of the “International Land Plane Free-For-All” (that is, the unlimited class race). Thompson Products (a predecessor to TRW) decided to sponsor a trophy to be awarded for the next ten years for unlimited class racing (though a stipulation was eventually added excluding women pilots). The trophy was designed by Walter Sinz and is now at Air and Space Museum. Sinz also made a pair of 10-foot-tall (3.0 m) models of the trophy for promotional purposes. Races were held for the next ten years, ending in 1939. Further races in this series were precluded by the onset of war.

After World War II the original trophy was (according to stipulation) retired. Also, advances in airplane technology, especially the advent of the turbojet, complicated matters. It was decided to establish a new series, with “R” (piston engine) and “J” (jet-powered) divisions. The “R” class was for civilian competition; the “J” division was for military pilots and was administered by the United States Air Force. Roscoe Turner, the last winner of the pre-war trophy, refused to relinquish it, but the original molds were located, and two additional casts were made, differing only in the legend engraved at the base and by placards identifying the division. Division “R” races were held from 1946 to 1949; Division “J” races (also known as “Military Speed Dashes”) were held from 1951 to 1961, excepting 1952 and 1960.

The Thompson Trophy race was one of the National Air Races of the heyday of early airplane racing in the 1930s. Established in 1929, the last race was held in 1961. The race was 10 miles (16 km) long with 50-foot-high (15 m) pylons marking the turns, and emphasized low altitude flying and maneuverability at high speeds. As the race was flown around a closed course, crowds in the grandstands could easily see much of the spectacle.

There were two series of Thompson races. The first series followed the award of a “Thompson Cup” in the 1929 National Air Races to the winner of the “International Land Plane Free-For-All” (that is, the unlimited class race). Thompson Products (a predecessor to TRW) decided to sponsor a trophy to be awarded for the next ten years for unlimited class racing (though a stipulation was eventually added excluding women pilots). The trophy was designed by Walter Sinz and is now at Air and Space Museum. Sinz also made a pair of 10-foot-tall (3.0 m) models of the trophy for promotional purposes. Races were held for the next ten years, ending in 1939. Further races in this series were precluded by the onset of war.

After World War II the original trophy was (according to stipulation) retired. Also, advances in airplane technology, especially the advent of the turbojet, complicated matters. It was decided to establish a new series, with “R” (piston engine) and “J” (jet-powered) divisions. The “R” class was for civilian competition; the “J” division was for military pilots and was administered by the United States Air Force. Roscoe Turner, the last winner of the pre-war trophy, refused to relinquish it, but the original molds were located, and two additional casts were made, differing only in the legend engraved at the base and by placards identifying the division. Division “R” races were held from 1946 to 1949; Division “J” races (also known as “Military Speed Dashes”) were held from 1951 to 1961, excepting 1952 and 1960.

First flying on August 22, 1931, the Gee Bee Z quickly proved to be tricky to fly, but fulfilled every expectation with regards to its speed. Flown by pilot Lowell Bayles, the Gee Bee Z attained the speed of 267.342 miles per hour (430.245 km/h) at the National Air Races during the Shell Speed Dash qualifying on September 1 then went on to win the Goodyear Trophy race, run over a course of 50 miles (80 km), the next day at an average speed of 205 miles per hour (330 km/h). On the September 5, the aircraft’s engineer, Bob Hall, flew the Gee Bee Z to victory in the General Tire and Rubber Trophy race, then won again the next day in a free-for-all event.

In the Thompson Trophy Race on September 7, Bayles was triumphant, winning with an average speed of 236.24 miles per hour (380.19 km/h), winning over competitors including Jimmy Doolittle, James “Jimmy” Wedell, Ben Howard, Dale Jackson, Bill Ong, Ira Eaker, and Hall, who finished fourth in a Gee Bee Model Y.

Following the Thompson Trophy race, the Gee Bee Z was re-engined with a larger, 750-horsepower (560 kW) Wasp Senior radial, in preparation for an attempt at establishing a world speed record for landplanes at Wayne County Airport in Detroit, Michigan. Unofficially clocked at 314 miles per hour (505 km/h) on a trial run, it surpassed the previous record of 278 miles per hour (447 km/h) by attaining 281.75 miles per hour (453.43 km/h) on December 1, 1931, but the margin was too small for the record to be officially registered.A further record attempt on December 5, 1931, would end in tragedy, the aircraft suffering a wing failure and rolling into the ground, killing Bayles

It was suspected that the Model Z’s crash during a speed run in December 1931 was due to an unexpected failure of the gasoline tank cap, which may have come loose and passed through the windshield. A bullet-proof windscreen and internal fuel caps were part of the new design. Analysis of motion picture film of the event examined frame-by-frame, is inconclusive. Control surface flutter is a more likely cause. It is theorized that the gas cap struck the pilot and incapacitated him, causing a sudden upset in pitch that led to uncontrolled flutter in the right aileron which imparted undue stress on that wing, causing it to pitch up sharply and fail. In addition, tests of a reproduction aircraft have shown that the Gee Bee Z was susceptible to aerodynamic flutter at high speed. The 1932 R-1 and its sister ship, the R-2, were the successors of the previous year’s Thompson Trophy-winning Model Z.

Speedbirds

Wheels Across The Desert!


Egypt 1915

Knights of the Skies


Please note that new German pilots will also be available soon!


Knights of the Skies

American Expeditionary Forces



American Expeditionary Forces

First Sudan War 1884 – 1885



Battle of Gallipoli 1915

First Sudan War


From 1855 what are now known as The Royal Marines, were labeled The Royal Marine Light Infantry. They were to mainly be used in a skirmishing capacity in front of infantry. They were issued gray wool coats and trousers. The foreign service helmets were not stained, but kept white in keeping with the pristine Marine turnout.

The marines were in Gen. Graham’s square at El Teb. At Tamai in 1884 they formed the rear wall of Maj. Davis’s 2nd Brigade square. When the wild Hadenodoa warriors flooded into the square through the gap left by the Black Watch. The rear rank of the marines were compelled to turnabout and fight in both directions. At this time the Marines acted as a breakwater to steady elements of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and the Black Watch as they recovered to retrieve the situation.

The Marines were to take part in most of the major actions throughout the Sudan Campaigns.

First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

Madists


More Mahdist’s are also on the way!

Wars of the Roses


Richard’s most loyal subject was John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk.

The duke had served Richard’s brother for many years and was one of Edward IV’s closer confidantes. He was a military veteran, having fought in the Battle of Towton in 1461 and served as Hastings’ deputy at Calais in 1471

John Howard was slain at the Battle of Bosworth Field on 22 August 1485 along with his friend and patron King Richard. Howard was the commander of the vanguard, and his son, the Earl of Surrey, his lieutenant. Howard was killed when a Lancastrian arrow struck him in the face after the face guard had been torn off his helmet during an earlier altercation with the Earl of Oxford.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487