Collectors Showcase – New Releases For May!

April 26th, 2015

American Revolution – British Artillery


New Releases Expected May 2015!



American Revolution

American Revolution – Continentals




American Revolution

American Civil War – 2nd Wisconsin




2nd Wisconsin

WWII



World War
II Collection

Masterworks Collection


Statues are 1/6th scale.



Masterworks Collection

Thomas Gunn – New Releases For May!

April 26th, 2015

WWII Allied Forces


  • PARA011 — Major Digby Tatham Warter DSO – in a relaxed pose with his famous umbrella. Digby was known to take his umbrella into battle with him so that
    he could be easily recognised as he had trouble remembering passwords! At Arnhem Digby was attached to A company 2 Para and lead several charges
    with his umbrella, some even wearing a Bowler hat he had acquired along the way!
    As the Germans surrounded the British, Digby was captured but due to his wounds was sent under guard to a hospital. Escaping soon afterwards he made
    his way back to the Allied lines along with another 150 Paras who were also trying to get back to their own lines. Upon his return to the UK Digby was
    awarded the DSO, he survived the war and set up a farm in Kenya where he died in 1993. Limited to 100 in number
  • PARA012 — Dead Para – An unlucky Para lies dead somewhere in Arnhem, a sad end for many
    of the Airborne Division that flew into Holland in 1944. Limited to 100
  • TG-FREE022 — Captain James Cleminson KBE MC – Captain James Cleminson KBE MC was also at Arnhem and was famously holed up with Major General Roy Urquhart in an attic, when the Germans surrounded the house they were stranded in. Urquhart apparently took exception to Cleminsons moustache which he called
    “damn silly” and this scene is repeated in the film A Bridge Too Far.
    Cleminson was also captured at Arnhem and held prisoner until 1945 where he was released by American forces. He returned to work at his father’s firm after the war and died in 2010. Our figure of Cleminson has him drinking a cup of tea perhaps chatting with Digby about the upcoming Arnhem operation
  • SOV009B — Standing Winter Russian Rifleman with Sledge – A Soviet rifleman suitable for The Russian Civil war or late 1941 looks over his sights as the enemy come into view. Limited to 100 in number
  • USA006A — Running GI Ranger – This version is wearing high leg boots and comes in either an A version with ‘Dry Legs look’ or a B version with the ‘Wet Legs Look’ both suitable for a just off the beach landing dio.
  • USA006B — Running GI Ranger – Wet Look



WWII Allied Forces

WWII German forces


  • FJ019 — “The Breakfast Club” #2 – Two more of our popular FJ’s in a relaxed mode to add to the first Breakfast Club recently issued. One FJ stands
    smoking a cigarette with his MG42 propped up in front of him whilst the other adopts a more casual pose resting his foot on an ammo box, note the
    captured Sten gun as his weapon of choice! A pan of fried egg makes a neat touch to this set. Please note that both these figures have no base and can
    be used as tank riders if so desired.



WWII German forces

WWII Pacific




WWII Pacific

World War One




World War One


Build-a-Rama – New May Releases!

April 26th, 2015

New Releases Expected In May!
Build A Rama Essentials




Build A Rama Essentials

Build A Rama Terrain Mats




Build A Rama Terrain Mats


First Legion – New Releases For May 2015!

April 26th, 2015

Macedonian Phalanx


Sets AG024-039 allow for the creation of a fully modular Phalanx, such as would have appeared under Alexander at the Battle of Guagamela. Designed with figures meant for the front, middle and rear ranks and armed with the 18+ foot long “Sarissa”, the Macedonian Phalanx is a must have for any serious “Ancient Greece” figure collection!!!



Macedonian Phalanx

Wild West


First Legion is pleased to present our rendition of the “Wild West”! Inspired by, and something of an homage to, the “spaghetti” westerns that most of us
enjoyed as children, the range will cover a wide variety of topics ranging from outlaws and lawmen to civilians and US Military and plains Indians.



Wild West

Zulu Wars




Anglo Zulu War

WWII Stalingrad Germans




Stalingrad Germans


King & Country – April Releases Part 2.

April 17th, 2015

“MUD, BLOOD & GUTS!”


We return to the trenches of the First World War with several new releases that reflect the harsh everyday reality of life…and death…on the Western Front in 1916 and 1917

  • FW158 — A Soldier’s Prayer – A British Army Padre reads a simple prayer
    over the dead body of a fallen “Tommy”. The design of the dead soldier was
    inspired by a similar figure which can be seen on the powerful Royal Artillery
    Memorial near London’s Hyde Park. During the Great War, three Army chaplains won
    the Victoria Cross, Britain’s highest award for gallantry and 179 were
    killed-in-action.
  • FW163 — Hold On Son, We’re Almost There! – A British Army medical orderly
    is assisted by a soldier to carry a badly wounded “Tom” back to the nearest Aid
    Station situated in or close behind the actual front line position.
  • FW173 — Nursing Sister – Between 1914 and 1918 over 10,000 regular and
    reserve members of Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service were at
    work in France, the Middle East, Italy, East Africa and India. Wherever they
    went they were easily recognized by their grey and white uniforms and scarlet
    red capes. This nurse is typical.
  • FW186 — German Casualties of War – For these three fallen “Sodaten” their
    war and suffering is over…
  • FW200 — Rescue Under Fire – Even though the battle still rages above their
    heads one “Tommy” has crawled into “No Man’s Land” to try and pull a wounded
    mate to safety…
  • FW201 — Spoils Of War – Two abandoned “Maschinengewehr 08” or MG08’s were
    the German Army’s standard machine gun during World War One. Adapted from the
    original 1884 “Maxim” gun these weapons were widely used on all fronts the
    Kaiser’s Army fought on…with deadly effect. Their nominal range was 2,000
    meters although they could be deadly up to 3,500 meters! Allied troops hated
    them with a vengeance because of the huge casualties they inflicted. If and when
    these guns were overrun attacking soldiers would often, without hesitation, kill
    the gun crews, even if they tried to surrender! These two guns fit perfectly
    with set no. FW186.



France 1917

Streets of Old Hong Kong


As the “Victorian Era” began to change into the “Edwardian” one so too did dress and styles in the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong.

For younger Chinese men “pigtails” were seen as a symbol of the old, decadent, down-trodden “Middle Kingdom”. Smart, short hair was adopted as one symbol of modernity and being part of the new 20th Century.

Women and girls also started to cut their hair and emulate their Western counterparts.

At the same time traditional Chinese costume was being simplified and becoming more comfortable and practical to wear.

This thoroughly modern young Bride & Groom exemplify the new movement.


Orient

Black Hawk – New Building For The American West

April 17th, 2015

New Building for the American West


For use with Cowboys or Gunfight at the OK Corral series.


The Cowboys

New John Jenkins Releases For May 2015!

April 17th, 2015

Speedbirds – New Collection


The Coupe d’Aviation Maritime Jacques Schneider, commonly called the Schneider Trophy or Schneider Prize (sometimes it is incorrectly referred to as the Schneider Cup, which is entirely different prize), was a trophy awarded annually to the winner of a race for seaplanes and flying boats. The Schneider Trophy is now held at the Science Museum, South Kensington, London.

Announced by Jacques Schneider, a financier, balloonist and aircraft enthusiast, in 1912, the competition offered a prize of approximately £1,000. The race was held twelve times between 1913 and 1931. It was intended to encourage technical advances in civil aviation but became a contest for pure speed with laps over a (usually) triangular course (initially 280 km, later 350 km). The contests were staged as time trials, with aircraft setting off individually at pre-agreed times, usually 15 minutes apart. The contests were very popular and some attracted crowds of over 200,000 spectators. An earlier trophy, also presented by Jacques Schneider in 1910, in France, was the Schneider Cup, which is held in the RAF College Cranwell.

If an aero club won three races in five years, they would retain the trophy and the winning pilot would receive 75,000 francs for each of the first three wins. Each race was hosted by the previous winning country. The races were supervised by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale and the aero club in the hosting country. Each club could enter up to three competitors with an equal number of alternatives.

The race was significant in advancing aeroplane design, particularly in the fields of aerodynamics and engine design, and would show its results in the best fighters of WW2. The streamlined shape and the low drag, liquid-cooled engine pioneered by Schneider Trophy designs are obvious in the British Supermarine Spitfire, the American North American P-51 Mustang, and the Italian Macchi C.202 Folgore.

The Supermarine S.6B is a British racing seaplane developed by R.J. Mitchell for the Supermarine company to take part in the Schneider Trophy competition of 1931. The S.6B marked the culmination of Mitchell’s quest to “perfect the design of the racing seaplane” and represented the cutting edge of aerodynamic technology.

The last in the line developed by Supermarine, it followed the S.4, S.5 and the S.6. Mitchell and his team’s experience in designing high speed Schneider Trophy floatplanes greatly contributing to the development of the later Supermarine Spitfire, an iconic fighter and Britain’s most successful interceptor of World War II.

The winning Schneider flight was piloted by Flt. Lt. John N. Boothman in aircraft serial number S1595 at a speed of 340.08 mph (547.19 km/h), flying seven perfect laps of the triangular course over the Solent, between the Isle of Wight and the British mainland.

Seventeen days later, Flt Lt. George Stainforth in S.6B serial S1596 broke the world air speed record reaching 407.5 mph (655.67 km/h).



Speedbirds

WWI – British




British Forces

WWI – French




French Army

Raid on Saint Francis, 1759


The Jersey Blues were raised in 1755, by the New Jersey provincial government. It was originally composed of five companies, and was sent to the northern frontier, to guard it against the French. They were known as the “Jersey Blues”, partly from the blue coats of the regiment, and partly from the similarlity of the uniform to that New Jersey used in the war of Jenkin’s Ear.

On April 4 1758, the General Assembly of New Jersey voted to increase the regiment to a strength of 1,000 officers and men, including 100 grenadiers.

In 1755, a regiment of New Jersey Provincials (500 men), known as the Jersey Blues, joined Shirley’s expedition against Fort Niagara. The regiment was under the command of Schuyler. The expedition departed from Albany and slowly advanced towards Fort Niagara along the Mohawk River. By mid September, Shirley realised that Fort Niagara was too strongly defended and abandoned his project. He retreated to New England, leaving the New Jersey Provincials to garrison Oswego. In December, the regiment was recalled to New Jersey where it took position on the frontier till next spring.

In the spring of 1756, the regiment was again on the northern frontier. It was divided into two parts, one garrisoned at Schenectady, while the other was placed under the colonel’s direct command. This latter detachment (500 men) was part of Shirley’s force which assembled in Albany in May. In August, when a French force under Montcalm laid siege to the complex of Oswego, 150 New Jersey Provincials were garrisoning the small Fort George. On August 14, when Oswego surrendered, the detachment of Fort George, including Colonel Schuyler, became prisoner of war and was brought back to Montréal. A new enlistment in New Jersey compensated for these losses.

In 1757, New Jersey refused to increase its contribution from 500 men to 1,000 men. In July, a detachment of 300 provincials, chiefly New Jersey men, was sent from Fort William Henry under command of Colonel Parker to reconnoitre the French outposts. On July 26, a large band of Indians, led by the French partisan Corbière, ambushed the detachment of New Jersey Provincials not far from Sabbath Day Point on the western shore of Lake George. Parker had divided his force and at daybreak three of his boats fell into the snare and were captured without a shot. Three others followed and shared the fate of the first. When the rest drew near, they were greeted by a deadly volley from the thickets, and a swarm of canoes darted out upon them. The men were seized with such a panic that some of them jumped into the water to escape, while the Indians leaped after them and speared them with their lances. Only some 100 men and three boats made their escape. In the following month, on August 9, the remainder of the regiment, only 301 men, were captured and paroled at the end of the siege of Fort William Henry, under condition of not serving again during 18 months. After the fall of Fort William Henry, New Jersey contributed 1,000 militia who marched to reinforce the British army while another 3,000 New Jersey militia were ready to march if it should be necessary.

In the spring of 1758, the regiment was reformed under Colonel John Johnson, officially counting 1,000 men. In July, this new regiment took part in the expedition against Carillon (present-day Ticonderoga). On July 5, they were embarked at the head of Lake George. On July 6, at daybreak, the British flotilla reached the narrow channel leading into Lake Champlain near Fort Carillon and disembarkation began at 9:00 a.m.. On July 8, they fought in the disastrous Battle of Carillon. At daybreak on July 9, the British army re-embarked and retreated to the head of the lake where it reoccupied the camp it had left a few days before.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Knights Of The Skies


  • BGC-023 — French Pilot – This figure is mainly for those collectors who have been unable to purchase an ACE-12P, and need a French pilot to display alongside their ACE-12.
  • GGC-020 — German Pilot – A generic German pilot, which can accompany any of the planes, or fill out an airfield diorama.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

Battle of Gallipoli 1915




Battle of Gallipoli 1915

New Blackhawk Gangland America Releases – Expected April

April 4th, 2015

Gangland America


New Series featuring the 1920 Prohibition Era.



Gangland America

King & Country April 2015 New Releases

April 4th, 2015

Wehrmacht


No less than 13 all-new releases that should please Wehrmacht Collectors whether they like their figures “on Parade” or…”On The Battlefield.”

  • WH013 — The 12-piece Classic Wehrmacht Band – These 12 musicians will march proudly into any collection that features “feldgrau” infantry. Dressed in their
    traditional everyday uniform, albeit with decorative silver and red “swallow-nests” on their shoulders, German military bands were a familiar sight on the streets of cities and towns in Nazi-occupied Europe.
  • WH014 — At attention – A new version of a typical guard duty pose.
  • WH015 — Marching Officer – On parade and leading the way…This officer has both the 1st and 2nd Class “Iron Cross” awards on his tunic.
  • WH016 — Marching Rifleman – The perfect accompaniment to WH015.
  • WH017 — Wehrmacht Mortar Team – Two kneeling “Soldaten” man their 81mm mortar and prepare to launch a bomb.
  • WH018-B — Dismounted Armoured Vehicle Crewmen (Black) – With so many K&C German tanks, armoured cars and other vehicles in collections it’s always useful to have additional crew members available in “non-action” roles… *WH018-G The two crewmen in “feldgrau” armoured vehicle jackets. *WH018-B Two crewmen wearing the Panzer black wrap-around short jackets. The choice is yours…
  • WH018-G — Dismounted Armoured Vehicle Crewmen (Feldgrau)
  • WH019 — “Take a Breather” – His stalhelm held in one hand, this “soldaten” rests on his rifle…He’s marched over 20 miles this day and he’ll march another 20 tomorrow. It’s often forgotten that the majority of German infantry in the first half of the war journeyed into battle…on foot!
  • WH020 — “Happy…!” – This field-grey infantryman seems pleased with himself…Has he just been given a leave pass?
  • WH021 — Pz. Kpfw. III Ausf.N – The Panzer III Ausf.N variant was an “assault tank” that was produced to meet the specific need for a stronger tank that could more effectively take on the Soviet T34. Designers decided to use the short-barreled 7.5cm main gun along with a special “hollow-charge” shell. Additional armour was also included in this model, especially around the turret. Production of these “N” variants began in June 1942 and continued through until August ’43. Just over 700 were built in this time. Most being conversions and upgrades from existing Ausf.L. and Ausf. M. tanks. This new version earned a good reputation from its crews and mostly saw action on the Eastern Front. Some models were also transferred from German stocks to Romania, Slovakia and Croatia after their replacement by more updated German armour. Our K&C model is in typical field grey and comes with a tank commander figure.
  • WH031 — Eat when you can – As every soldier knows…”Sleep when you can…Eat when you can!” This man enjoys a mess-tin of hot food.
  • WH032 — The 20-piece Classic Wehrmacht Band – 12 x marching musicians look good… 20 look even better! All of the different German armed services supplied bands and musicians to accompany their troops in the field. When not engaged in musical activities bandsmen often acted as stretcher bearers and assistants to the German military medical services.
  • WH-S01 — Standing at Attention Set – This little 2-man set gives you two great figures at a “special” price.
  • WH-S02 — On the March Set – A 3-man marching set to follow your marching officer (WH015). If you think 3 look good…try making it 33…! Now that will really impress your friends. A “special value” package again!


German Wehrmacht

Policing The Trenches


Even in the midst of battle it was necessary to employ Military Policemen…Their duties were many and varied…From directing traffic to ensuring supplies of ammunition get to the front. The Military Police also collected enemy prisoners and any soldier attempting to escape or evade their duties in the front line. They enforced military discipline and also provided security for the “top brass”. They were not alas, universally popular…

  • FW198 — WW1 Military Policemen – A pair of “Red Caps” (on account of their red service cap covers) directing traffic and on the lookout for deserters, malingerers and others trying to evade their duties. Special Note: All rank and file Military Policemen were Non Commissioned Officers. The older Corporal is pointing, the younger Lance Corporal is watching.


France 1917

Medieval




Medieval Collection

John Jenkins New Releases April 2015!

April 4th, 2015

THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918


The General Service Wagon was used by the British Army from the 1860′s up to World War 1 (until mechanised transport took over) in various versions up to the Mk X.
They were used to transport a wide variety of materials and were a simple, yet tough vehicle, suitable for all conditions.


British Forces

French Army


World War I cost France 1,357,800 dead, 4,266,000 wounded (of whom 1.5 million were permanently maimed) and 537,000 made prisoner or missing — exactly 73% of
the 8,410,000 men mobilized. France had 40 million citizens at the start of the war; six in ten men between the ages of eighteen and twenty-eight died or were
permanently maimed.


French Army

KNIGHTS OF THE SKIES


A well known feature of Rotary engines was its use of castor oil. With the fuel and oil mixed together in the crankcase it was important that the fuel not dissolve the oil and ruin its lubricating qualities. The perfect choice was pharmaceutical-quality castor oil—it would stand the heat and centrifugal force, and its gum-forming tendency were irrelevant in a total-loss lubrication system.

An unfortunate side effect was that pilots inhaled and swallowed a considerable amount of the oil during flight, leading to persistent diarrhea. This also accounts for the pilot’s use of a flowing white scarf—not for a dashing image, but to wipe goggles clear of the persistent oil mist flowing past the cockpit.


Knights Of The Skies – WWI

THE BATTLE OF GALLIPOLI 1915


The Gallipoli campaign was a costly failure for the Allies, with an estimated 27,000 French, and 115,000 British and dominion troops (Great Britain and Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, India, and Newfoundland) killed or wounded. Over half these casualties (73,485) were British and Irish troops.

Australian casualties for the Gallipoli campaign amounted to 26,111, comprising of 1,007 officers and 25,104 other ranks.

New Zealand suffered around 8000 killed and wounded.

The Ottoman Empire paid a heavy price for their victory: an estimated 250,000 Turkish and Arab troops were killed or wounded defending Gallipoli.



Battle of Gallipoli 1915

Future Releases, Yet To Be Announced – John “Jack” Simpson Kirkpatrick


John “Jack” Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey, who he called “Murphy” and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from the front line to the beach, for evacuation.

He continued this work for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed, during the Third attack on Anzac Cove.

Simpson and his Donkey are a part of the “Anzac legend”.

Digger Carrying Wounded Soldier


Some of the terrain was so rough that it was impossible for stretcher bearers to evacuate the wounded. This “digger” even retains his rifle with fixed bayonet, as he carries his mate to safety.

Spanish Civil War – 1936




Spanish Civil War – 1936

Battle of the Plains of Abraham




Battle of the Plains of Abraham