New Hobby Master Releases For April 2015!

November 30th, 2014

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:72 Scale


Highly-detailed, fully featured military models in New from Hobby Master, the Legends Series of 1/6 figures are modeled after heroic individuals who risked all during times of war. The first release in that collection, an incredibly realistic model of Col. C.E. “Bud” Anderson, the pilot of “Old Crow” and a World War II triple ace, is available in signed and unsigned editions.


Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:72 Scale

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.




Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

Modern Air Power Collection – 1:72 Scale




Modern Air Power Collection

New John Jenkins – December Releases!

November 16th, 2014

First World War – French

This was the appearance of the Saint-Chamond Tank after its first upgrade. It was armed with the 75 Tir Rapide (TR) Model 12 Cannon. The vehicle featured four roof turrets, two observation turrets forward, one on either side, with one between them for venting the gunsmoke after the firing of the cannon. The fourth turret was at the rear on the left hand side, and was used by the driver whilst driving backwards. The turrets were in fact weak spots of the tank’s structure, and it was quite common that machine gun fire would shoot away the turrets. The observation turrets were therefore removed for the later version.

The next round of French Infantry are in production! These will include more casualties, and 2 German prisoners.

The Chauchat, named after its main contributor Colonel Louis Chauchat, was the standard machine rifle or light machine gun of the French Army during World War I (1914–18). Its official designation was “Fusil Mitrailleur Modele 1915 CSRG” ( in English: “Machine Rifle Model 1915 CSRG” ). It was mass manufactured during World War I by two reconverted civilian plants: “Gladiator” and “Sidarme” . Beginning in June 1916, it was placed into regular service with French infantry where the troops called it the FM Chauchat. The Chauchat machine rifle in 8mm Lebel was also extensively used in 1917-1918 by the American Expeditionary Forces (A.E.F) where it was officially designated as the “Automatic Rifle, Model 1915 (Chauchat)”. The armies of eight other nations, notably: Belgium, Finland, Greece, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia and Serbia, also used the Chauchat machine rifle in fairly large numbers during and after World War
I.

A total of 262,000 Chauchat machine rifles were manufactured between December 1915 and November 1918, including 244,000 chambered for the 8mm Lebel service cartridge, making it the most widely-manufactured automatic weapon of World War I.

The Chauchat machine rifle was one of the first light, automatic rifle caliber weapons designed to be carried and fired by a single operator and an assistant, without a heavy tripod or a team of gunners. It set a precedent for several subsequent 20th century firearm projects, being a portable yet full power automatic weapon built inexpensively and in very large numbers. The Chauchat combined a pistol grip, an in-line stock, a detachable magazine, and a selective fire capability in a compact package of manageable weight (20 pounds) for a single soldier. Furthermore, it could be routinely fired from the hip and while walking (marching fire).



French Army

First World War – British

The Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) was an arm of the Royal Artillery that was originally tasked with manning the guns of the British Empire’s forts and fortresses, including coastal artillery batteries, the heavy gun batteries attached to each infantry division, and the guns of the siege artillery.

In the quagmire of trench warfare, it was finally realised that it was not the place for the artillery to be in the infantry line.

Henceforth the artillery would be positioned well behind the infantry battle line, firing at unseen targets, at co-ordinates on a map calculated with geometry and mathematics. As the war developed, the heavy artillery and the techniques of long-range artillery were massively developed. The RGA was often supported by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) who had devised a system where pilots could use wireless telegraphy to help the artillery hit specific targets.

From 1914 the RGA grew into a very large component of the British forces on the battlefield, being armed with heavy, large-calibre guns and howitzers that were positioned some way behind the front line and had immense destructive power. The corps name was discontinued in 1924, when the RGA was re-amalgamated into the Royal Artillery

Ammunition supply to the Royal Field Artillery (RFA) and other field artillery units was normally the role of the Royal Artillery: that part of the Royal Regiment of Artillery which retained the Royal Artillery (RA) shoulder badges. However during the war the RGA, which had large numbers of men idling in fortified batteries around the World with little chance of seeing action, provided a draft of sub-units to the Western Front to assist with ammunition supply in the field, and the operation of supply dumps

**PLEASE NOTE, Several of these Artillery crew sets, can also be used with the Supply tank and Trucks.**

The British did not have a separate Corps of Signals in the Great War: it was agreed that an independent unit would be formed in 1918, but for various administrative reasons it was delayed until 1920.

At the outbreak of war in August 1914 all the British Armies signalling/ intercommunication requirements were met by the Royal Engineers Signal Services (RESS) that was formed in 1908. Previously, in 1870, the responsibility for all military communications was officially given to the Telegraph Troop, of the Royal Engineers.

**Please Note, more figures with pigeons are on the workbench, together with a pair of horses for the Pigeon Wagon.**

Whilst rather primitive and cumbersome wireless sets were available using, Morse Code, the British Army could not find any practical application for wireless at the early stage of the War and it was not until the final months of war in 1918 that wireless sets became widely deployed at the battalion level.

The inter-communications situation grew worse in early 1915 as the tempo of war increased and enemy activity and the winter weather wrought damage to the existing military communication systems. Many telegraph lines and (as they expanded, telephone lines) were either strung out in the open on ad hoc supports or buried in shallow trenches. The passage of men and material wreaked serious damage on the system, as did the incessant shelling in certain sectors. At that time the high explosive shell fuses only exploded when the round had penetrated quite deeply into the ground and was thus, potentially, in close proximity to the buried telephone lines.

Increasing recourse was had to pigeons carrying coded messages from the Front Line to the battalion HQ and beyond. Originally the British Army on the Western Front did not have any messenger pigeons. But in September 1914, the French provided a nucleus aviary of 15 pigeons from which was developed a bird strength of thousands: 12,000 pigeons were deployed at the First Battle of the Somme in 1916, and by 1918, 20,000 birds were available for duty.

Messenger dogs (Liaison dogs) were introduced for night work with mixed results. They tended to be spoiled as regimental pets and were much more susceptible to toxic gas and battle stress than the pigeons.



British Forces

KNIGHTS OF THE SKIES

Leutenant Hans Weiss was a World War I flying ace credited with 16 aerial victories

Weiss scored his first victory on the 17th August 1917, and was commissioned a leutenant in October 1917. He then went on a streak as a balloon buster, downing four observation balloons in a row. Weiss followed that with four triumphs over enemy aircraft, the last of which, his tenth win, occurred on 13 March 1918. He was transferred to Royal Prussian Jasta 10, which was part of Manfred von Richthofen’s Flying Circus. He scored a single victory there, on 28 March 1918, before being transferred to another Flying Circus unit, Royal Prussian Jasta 10, as a Flight Leader. He scored his first win in his new unit on 2 April 1918.

Six days later, he was selected to temporarily command Jasta 11, and did so until his death in action on 2 May 1918.

On that day, Weiss was flying his Fokker Triplane; although Richthofen’s Jagdgruppe used scarlet as their identifying color, Weiss’s plane was largely or entirely “Weiss” (white). Weiss died of a bullet through the head from the guns of No. 209 Squadron’s Lt. Merrill Samuel Taylor’s Sopwith Camel while attacking another Camel from Taylor’s unit.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

THE RAID ON ST. FRANCIS



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

BATTLE OF THE PLAINS OF ABRAHAM



Battle of the Plains of Abraham

THE PENINSULAR WAR 1807-1814



Peninsular War 1807-1814

New King & Country Release – World of Dickens

November 16th, 2014

World of Dickens

The first figures and buildings of this whole new version of an old favorite!



World of Dickens

Hobby Master New Releases Arriving November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

Hobby Master Legends.


Highly-detailed, fully featured military models in New from Hobby Master, the Legends Series of 1/6 figures are modeled after heroic individuals who risked all during times of war. The first release in that collection, an incredibly realistic model of Col. C.E. “Bud” Anderson, the pilot of “Old Crow” and a World War II triple ace, is available in signed and unsigned editions.


Action Figures

Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.




Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

Modern Air Power Collection – 1:72 Scale




Modern Air Power Collection

Ground Power Collection




Ground Power Collection

Thomas Gunn New Releases Expected November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

French & Indian Wars




French & Indian Wars

French Foreign Legion




French Foreign Legion

WWI British and French


With it being so close to Christmas we decided it was time for some festive Tommies to commemorate the first winter in the trenches.
Some Winter Germans are planned and maybe here for December, if not then they will be available in January 2015.



World War One

New Russian WWII


A great mixture of troops for November as TGM goes East!
This time we go back to 1941 with poorly equipped Russian troops taking on the might of the Wehrmacht. It would not be long before these troops would turn the tide on Nazi Germany with a little help from the Allies in the form of thousands of vehicles, aircraft and even ships, plus a whole lot of blood, sweat and tears on the Russian side. Gradually as we all know, the Russian war machine became so vast it was unstoppable and as Marshal Zukhov once said and I love this quote, “Quantity has a quality all of its own!”

All the Russians come in a choice of a Summer 1941 (A version) or Winter 1941 look (B version), personally I really like the guys in the Budenovka hats, something unique in 1/30 scale at the moment. As mentioned previously the webbing and equipment will also suit those of you looking to recreate a 1919 Russian Civil war scenario. These guys I feel would also go great with the K&C Classic early WW2 Germans released not that long ago, the choice is yours.



WWII Allied Forces

WWII Pacific


December will see two more Japanese soldiers including a mortar figure.
January will see the first of our much requested Allied jungle patrol figures with a reluctant mule in tow!



WWII Pacific

WWII German




WWII German forces

First Legion New Releases Expected November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

Roman Praetorian Guard Fighting


We are pleased to present the second release covering the Imperial Roman Praetorian Guard! While the first release portrayed the Praetorians marching, this time we’ve portrayed them heavily engaged in combat protecting the Emperor Marcus Aurelius. The Roman Praetorian Guard was the personal bodyguard of the Roman Emperors. In addition to their political role of being the strongest armed military force within Rome, they took part in various campaigns and battles including those of Marcus Aurelius as they were at least the equal of any other Roman Legion in terms of combat effectiveness. Presented here in striking combat poses, these figures are designed to be fully engaged with our enemies of Rome. With their imperial purple colors, black leather lorica segmentata, and photo etched steel pilum and gladius, this release is certainly the most striking Roman release we’ve done for our incredibly popular Glory of Rome figure range.



Roman Praetorian Guard Fighting

Woodland Indians


While part of our American Revolution product range, these figures are of course perfectly useful for a much wider time period including but not limited to the French & Indian War. They can represent such tribes as the Iroquois speaking Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, and Huron or Algonquian speaking Abenaki, Chippewa, Delaware, or Mohicans. The Eastern Indians were the first to make contact with European settlers and had both periods of peace and trade as well as periods of conflict with various tribes and with European settlers and armies siding with one side or the other, thus allowing these figures to be used as allies to either side or even fighting each other. From a design perspective, our Woodland Indians have provided us a wonderful opportunity to produce very colorful and ornate figures that really highlight our strengths as a figure company. Simply put, these are the finest figures available today and we will continue to expand upon this sub-range to include both additional fighting and non-combat/tribal life scenes over the years to come.



Woodland Indians

Mamluks



Mamluks

World War One – Germans




World War One – Germans

Stalingrad Germans




Stalingrad Germans

Collectors Showcase New Releases Expected Late November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

American Revolution


New series of American Revolution figures, we start with the British.



American Revolution

Napoleonic – French Curassier




Napoleonic – French Curassier

German WWII


1st Division Waffen SS during the Normandy defense. Arriving too late for the actual beach landings the 1st SS began a series of defensive actions as the Allies moved forward. We’ve created an exquisite 9 figure set composition that gives the dioramist all of the set flexibility needed to capture desperate moments of this dogged defense.

These pea-dotted troopers exemplify the elite status these units had. From the BMW R75 dispatch rider to the new flak crew. Collectors will prize these limited edition sets. Shown at the Chicago show for the first time collectors were delighted.



German WWII

German WWII Winter




German WWII Winter

Masterworks Collection

Masterworks Full Figure collection. Cast from highly detailed heavy resin. Each piece comes on a highly detailed terrain pedestal, hard wood base and a certificate of authenticity suitable for framing.



Masterworks Collection

John Jenkins New Releases Expected November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

Battle of the Plains of Abraham


Battle of the Plains of Abraham

Raid on Saint Francis


Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Knights Of The Skies

Werner Steinhauser was born in Konigsburg 20th June 1893.

After downing a balloon with FA(A) 261, Steinhäuser joined Jasta 11 at the end of 1917. He was wounded in action and forced to land on 17 March 1918. Having scored ten victories, he was killed in action when his Fokker DR.I was shot down over Neuilly, 26th June 1918

There are many photos of German pilots and crews with stuffed teddy bears and other stuffed animals affixed to their struts. Fritz Hoehn of Jasta 21 had a teddy bear on his Pfalz D.IIIa, mounted just behind his cockpit looking aft – as if it were guarding his ‘six’.


Knights Of The Skies – WWI

THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918 – British

Pigeons played an exceptional role in WWI and WWII. Pigeons were able to fly over enemy lines to send messages to allies all over the continent without the risk of having planes shot down or vehicles destroyed trying to relay that same message. Although many pigeons were killed in the process of transferring these messages, their success was great enough to merit the establishment of the Pigeon Corps in 1915. This group started with 15 mobile pigeon stations, or pigeon wagons, each with 4 birds and a handler and grew in size to over 400 men and 22,000 pigeons by the end of the war.

Pigeons had a small canister attached to their legs that allowed for a message to be inserted and transported back to command posts. This system proved to be the most effective means of transporting important messages as pigeons are incredibly fast fliers and the telegraph system that existed during the war was still not very efficient. Many of these pigeons carried messages that saved the lives of many soldiers, and as a result, were awarded medals for heroism and service to their respective countries. One pigeon named ‘Red Cock’ carried a message that contained the coordinates of a sinking boat that had been torpedoed back to its loft at the command post which allowed a rescue team to be dispatched in time to save the crew. For his services, ‘Red Cock’ was awarded the Dickin Medal for his bravery. This medal is the animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross which is awarded to individuals “for most conspicuous bravery, or some daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.”

The Dickin Medal

The Dickin Medal is the highest honor that an animal can be awarded for military service, and of the 55 Dickin Medals awarded to animals, 32 of them were awarded to pigeons. Another pigeon named ‘Cher Ami’ had an even more fascinating story. In 1918, 500 allied soldiers were trapped with no food or ammunition in France and were being bombarded by friendly fire. Many men were being killed and there seemed to be no hope of surviving the attack. As a last ditch effort a message was attached to a pigeon which was released and immediately shot down by the enemy. A second pigeon was released with a message and a suffered a similar fate. The final pigeon, ‘Cher Ami’ was then called for. As with the first two birds, a message was attached to its leg and it was released into the sky. ‘Cher Ami’ was instantly shot through the breast and fell to the ground; however, unlike his predecessors, ‘Cher Ami’ got back up and continued to fly another 25 miles, amidst a sky of bullets and the chaos of war, all the way back to headquarters. He delivered the message and was able to save the 194 remaining soldiers from certain death; however, his wounds consisted of a shot through the breast, a blinded eye and a nearly unattached leg. Miraculously, medics were able to save the bird and replaced his wounded leg with a wooden one. For his services, ‘Cher Ami’ was awarded the Croix de Guerre Medal, inducted into the racing pigeon hall of fame, and became the mascot of the Department of Service.

The Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) was an arm of the Royal Artillery that was originally tasked with manning the guns of the British Empire’s forts and fortresses, including coastal artillery batteries, the heavy gun batteries attached to each infantry division, and the guns of the siege artillery.

In the quagmire of trench warfare, it was finally realised that it was not the place for the artillery to be in the infantry line.

Henceforth the artillery would be positioned well behind the infantry battle line, firing at unseen targets, at co-ordinates on a map calculated with geometry and mathematics. As the war developed, the heavy artillery and the techniques of long-range artillery were massively developed. The RGA was often supported by the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) who had devised a system where pilots could use wireless telegraphy to help the artillery hit specific targets.

From 1914 the RGA grew into a very large component of the British forces on the battlefield, being armed with heavy, large-calibre guns and howitzers that were positioned some way behind the front line and had immense destructive power. The corps name was discontinued in 1924, when the RGA was re-amalgamated into the Royal Artillery

Ammunition supply to the Royal Field Artillery (RFA) and other field artillery units was normally the role of the Royal Artillery: that part of the Royal Regiment of Artillery which retained the Royal Artillery (RA) shoulder badges. However during the war the RGA, which had large numbers of men idling in fortified batteries around the World with little chance of seeing action, provided a draft of sub-units to the Western Front to assist with ammunition supply in the field, and the operation of supply dumps

Several of these Artillery crew sets, can also be used with the Supply tank and Trucks.


British Forces

THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918 – French

World War I cost France 1,357,800 dead, 4,266,000 wounded (of whom 1.5 million were permanently maimed) and 537,000 made prisoner or missing — exactly 73% of the 8,410,000 men mobilized.
France had 40 million citizens at the start of the war; six in ten men between the ages of eighteen and twenty-eight died or were permanently maimed.


French Army

King & Country November 2014 Releases!

November 6th, 2014

English Civil War – Pike & Musket In Stock Now!


Just announced 4 x Two-Figure “Fighting Doubles” in their own 2 figure boxes.


English Civil War – Pike & Musket

King & Country Calendar 2015


Yes it that time of year again, and the announcement of the new 2015 calendar. If you would like one let us know, for our regular King & Country customers we will be including one in your shipment. For new customers we will be pleased to include one, just for you. The
calendar is also available to order on-line.


King & Country Calendar

Christmas Releases


These new additions came as a surprise, but a very welcome one. As they look terrific.

  • XM014-04 — Santa & His Notebook – As every child knows Santa
    keeps a book in which he writes down who has been good or bad and naughty or
    nice. Now he’s deciding which boys and girls deserve a present!?! Set includes
    Santa, the bench and the “Bag of Goodies”.
  • XM014-03 — The Christmas Tree – Beautifully decorated this
    snow-dusted tree stands atop a whole bunch of gaily wrapped presents.


Christmas – Limited Edition

D-Day ’44


Two reissues of American & British paratroopers by special request…


D-Day ’44

Battle of the Bulge



Battle of the Bulge

German Field Hospital


  • WH006 — Nurse with Basin – This young German nurse brings a basin of water to allow the doctor to “wash-up” before he moves on to the next casualty.
  • WH007 — The Surgeon – This doctor attempts to clean up after dealing with the last seriously wounded soldier.
  • WH008 — The Wheelchair – Empty for the moment…but invaluable in any hospital display, diorama or collection.
  • WH009 — Disabled Officer & Nurse – It’s unlikely that this German Officer will be returning to the front…He’s already lost part of his left leg and his right arm…His war is over – the nurse helps move him to another part of the Field Hospital.


German Field Hospital

Operation Market Garden


Two reissues of American & British paratroopers by special request…


Operation Market Garden

Royal Airforce


  • RAF054 — RAF Bedford 1939 Fire Appliance – This second version of our 1939 Bedford Fire Engine is a “must-have” for any of our “RAF” collectors.
    Resplendent in RAF “blue” with white trim, these Bedfords joined a host of other British trucks that were converted into fire appliances for service all over the UK and overseas.
  • RAF068 — Fire Sergeant – The NCO is wearing his everyday blue overalls and “fireman’s belt” topped off by his fire red tin helmet.
  • RAF069 — Fighting the Blaze – Two more RAF firemen, hose and “branch” in hand tackle a fire…the length of hose supplied attaches to the fire engine itself.
  • RAF070 — The Axeman – In some crashed aircraft the only way to extricate a trapped airman was to cut them out…by hand and with a fireaxe.


Royal Airforce

WWI – British


After the “BIG PUSH” there’s the aftermath…

  • FW161 — Standing Stretcher Bearer – - This “Jock” stands holding his folded stretcher…perfect for any “behind the lines” display.
  • FW162 — “The Last Goodbye” – A “Tommy” stands wearily at rest…his battalion has been decimated and his mates are either dead…wounded…or
    missing!
  • FW164 — “Have a Drink” – Even on the battlefield there is compassion…a badly-wounded “Fritz”, supported by a comrade, is offered a drink from the water bottle of his British captor.
  • FW165 — Walking Wounded – One “Tommy” helps another back to the Casualty Clearing Station
  • FW168 — Bantam & Prisoner – During WW1, as British casualties mounted, the urgent need for replacements forced the Army to lower its physical requirements (especially height) and allow smaller men to join up — in specially-formed Battalions called “Bantams”. Here one of these smaller soldiers, although wounded, escorts a captured German to the rear.
  • FW169 — Sitting Wounded Tommy – This wounded corporal enjoys a mug of hot tea before returning to his unit.
  • FW170 — Sitting Wounded Fritz – Another wounded soldier, German
    this time, holds up his badly wounded leg while waiting to see the Medical Orderly.


France 1917

AUSSIES AT WAR


The British Dominions played an important and gallant role with Britain’s own army on the Western Front. Australia was one of the first to “answer the call” of the Mother Country and send troops to fight, first in Egypt, then Gallipoli and on to France…Here’s our first batch – 12 figures…10 individual soldiers and one 2-man set…all in action.

Special Note: These 12 figures are in a choice of 3 Separate Infantry Battalions from the Australian States of  Victoria…Queensland…and New South Wales.

All three fought with distinction at Gallipoli before moving to France and the Western Front and fighting there for the remainder of the war as part of the Australian First Infantry Division.

All figures are available as single figures. For space reasons we are not listing them all here, please visit our Aussies at War page for details. We have also created 3 special groupings.


Aussies at War

Britain’s New Arrivals Expected November 2014!

November 6th, 2014

78th Regiment (Highland) of Foot – Museum Collection



78th Regiment (Highland) of Foot

Battle of the Somme



Battle of the Somme

Christmas Truce 1914



Christmas Truce 1914