Britains New Releases Late March 2015

February 21st, 2015

WWI – German


World War I

WWI – British


World War I

American Civil War



American Civil War

John Jenkins February Releases.

February 21st, 2015

John Jenkins Collectors Club

SENEZERGUES DE LA RODDE, ÉTIENNE-GUILLAUME DE, was an officer in the French regular army; Born 29 Aug. 1709 at Aurillac, France, son of Louis de Senezergues, governor of Aurillac; died 14 Sept. 1759.

Étienne-Guillaume de Senezergues entered his father’s old regiment, La Sarre, as a supernumerary half-pay lieutenant at the age of 14 and was commissioned an ensign on 1 Oct. 1726, a lieutenant the following year, and captain in 1734. He saw action in Italy during the War of the Polish Succession and campaigned in Germany and Italy in the War of the Austrian Succession. By 1747 he commanded the second battalion of his regiment, the titular lieutenant-colonel being unfit for active service.

When, in 1756, one battalion of the La Sarre was posted to Canada, Senezergues, now breveted lieutenant-colonel of the second battalion, was not obliged to go. His patrimony of some 10,000 livres a year made him financially independent and his family ardently desired him to remain in France. But he was an ambitious career soldier, sought advancement, and was motivated by a stern sense of duty. Thus he sailed from Brest on 3 April 1756, arriving at Quebec 13 May.

In June his battalion was ordered to Fort Frontenac (Kingston, Ont.) for garrison duty and then took part in the capture of Oswego. For his role in this campaign he was awarded a pension of 500 livres. In 1757 he distinguished himself at the siege of Fort William Henry (also called Fort George, now Lake George, N.Y.). The Chevalier de Levis, wrote that although it had not been Senezergues’s turn to march, he had volunteered to serve with the advance assault since he was the only lieutenant-colonel fit for such arduous duty. He was awarded a second pension of 500 livres after this campaign.
The following year Governor General Vaudreuil organized a force of 1,600 men, comprising colonial regular troops, Canadian militia, an élite force of French regulars, and allied Indians, for an assault on Schenectady, New York. Lévis was given the command and again Senezergues offered to accompany him as second in command, an offer that Lévis was glad to accept. No sooner had the expedition left Montreal, however, than it was recalled and sent post-haste to Lake Champlain. Word had been received that Major-General James Abercromby had massed 25,000 men for an assault on the French forts.

Lévis and Senezergues arrived at Carillon (Ticonderoga) with their relief force of 400 Canadian regulars and militia on the night of 7 July. Montcalm’s army was entrenched behind a hastily constructed barricade on the crest of the slope west of the fort. Next day the British attacked in four columns. Senezergues and his battalion on the left flank under Colonel BOURLAMAQUE’s command came under heavy assault by two of the columns. When Bourlamaque was severely wounded Senezergues took over the command. Three assaults were beaten back with heavy losses to the British who broke and fled in disorder. In reports to the minister of War both Montcalm and Lévis singled out Senezergues for praise; they urged strongly that he be promoted to brigadier without regard for seniority. Montcalm declared that he was the senior officer most often called on for active duty, was better qualified than any of the other battalion commanders to command a corps with dignity, and the only one fit to remain in Canada to command the battalions that might stay in the colony at the end of hostilities. He was duly promoted brigadier on 10 Feb. 1759.

The same year, at the siege of Quebec, Senezergues was again in the thick of the fighting. After the departure of Lévis for the Montreal front on 9 August he became Montcalm’s second in command. On 13 September when Montcalm belatedly became aware that the British army was massed on the Plains of Abraham, Senezergues was ordered to hold the Beauport flank until the enemy’s intentions became clear, then to bring his battalion to the heights on the far side of Quebec. He and his men thus arrived on the battlefield after a forced march. With hardly a pause for breath they were ordered to charge the left of the enemy line. In that brief fateful clash Senezergues fell, mortally wounded. When the smoke of battle cleared he was taken on board a British warship. He died the next day. On receiving word of the outcome of the battle Colonel Bourlamaque wrote: “We have lost in M. de Senezergues an officer of distinction, as virtuous as he was brave; I am terribly sorry.”



John Jenkins Collectors Club

Great War – British Forces

The first LGOC B-Type Bus entered service on the streets of London in 1910.
On 18th October 1914, 300 LGOC B-Type Buses were impressed and ordered to the ASC depot at Grove Park for preparations to join the BEF in France. By the end of the war 1,319 buses had been taken to France, leaving only 300 serving in Britain.

On a pleasant day the preferred seat would always be on the top deck, although any change in weather conditions might cause a sudden change of heart. The B-Type was designed to carry 34 passengers in peacetime, but with all of their equipment this was reduced to just 25 soldiers.
Advertising hoardings and especially the lower floor windows were carefully boarded up with wooden planks to avoid occupants being injured by flying glass.

Great War – French Army

World War I cost France 1,357,800 dead, 4,266,000 wounded (of whom 1.5 million were permanently maimed) and 537,000 made prisoner or missing — exactly 73% of the 8,410,000 men mobilized.
France had 40 million citizens at the start of the war; six in ten men between the ages of eighteen and twenty-eight died or were permanently maimed.



French Army

CREW DUTIES OF A 6-INCH HOWITZER DETACHMENT.

Number 1: Commands the ‘gun’ (howitzer). Selects ground for gun platform. Lays for elevation and passes angle for dial sight and deflection to No.4. Supervises ramming and gives order to fire. Fits and removes rocking bar sight with No.4.

Number 2: Opens and closes the breech. Inserts tubes in the vent. Fires the gun. Operates the rapid elevating gear, putting the gun in and out of loading position (7½0 elevation ). Applies right brake as soon as the gun laying is complete (unless girdles are fitted). Attends to the right brake when traveling (horse-drawn batteries). Removes and replaces muzzle and breech covers. Assists No.3 in lifting and traversing the trail.

Number 3: Rams home the round (with No.5). Uncaps fuzes. Applies left brake as soon as laying is complete (unless girdles are fitted). Attends to the left brake when traveling (horse-drawn batteries). Assists No.2 in lifting and traversing the trail.

Number 4: Lays(aims) the gun, with No.1. Removes and replaces sight cover. Assists No.1 fitting rocking bar sight. Clamps dial sight, fits clinometer. Directs No.6 planting night-picket and aiming posts.

Number 5: Rams home the round (with No.3). Assists No. 10 cleaning and fuzing shells.

Number 6: Prepares, fetches and loads cartridges. Plants night-firing picket (with No.9) and aiming posts. Assists No.7 clearing the spade when choked.

Number 7 and 9: Assist No.10 preparing shells. Carry shells to the gun. No.7 assists No.6 to clear the spade when choked. No.9 plants picket with No.6.

Number 8: (an NCO) Prepares charges (cartridges) and groups by lots. Keeps record of charges.

Number 10: Issues shells, and issues tubes to No.2. Ensures shells are clean and fuzed.



British Forces

THE BATTLE OF GALLIPOLI 1915

With World War I stalled on the Western Front by 1915, the Allied Powers were debating going on the offensive in another region of the conflict, rather than continuing with attacks in Belgium and France. Early that year, Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas appealed to Britain for aid in confronting a Turkish invasion in the Caucasus. (The Ottoman Empire had entered World War I on the side of the Central Powers, Germany and Austria-Hungary, by November 1914.) In response, the Allies decided to launch a naval expedition to seize the Dardanelles Straits, a narrow passage connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara in northwestern Turkey. If successful, capture of the straits would allow the Allies to link up with the Russians in the Black Sea, where they could work together to knock Turkey out of the war.

The Gallipoli Campaign of 1915-16, also known as the Battle of Gallipoli or the Dardanelles Campaign, was an unsuccessful attempt by the Allied Powers to control the sea route from Europe to Russia during World War I. The campaign began with a failed naval attack by British and French ships on the Dardanelles Straits in February-March 1915 and continued with a major land invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula on April 25, involving British and French troops as well as divisions of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC). Lack of sufficient intelligence and knowledge of the terrain, along with a fierce Turkish resistance, hampered the success of the invasion. By mid-October, Allied forces had suffered heavy casualties and had made little headway from their initial landing sites. Evacuation began in December 1915, and was completed early the following January



Battle of Gallipoli 1915

Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Blackrobes’ was the name given to Catholic priests in the New World by the Native Americans, referring to their distinctive clothing.
The Canadian movie “Black Robe” was the inspiration for this figure. For those interested in this figure, please check out the movie

The Society of Jesus is a Christian male religious congregation of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits.

With the discovery and colonization of New France during the 17th century, the Society of Jesus and the Jesuits played an active role in Canada. When Samuel de Champlain was placing the foundations of the French colony at Quebec, he realized that this land was inhabited by native tribes that possessed their own languages, customs and traditions. These natives that inhabited modern day Ontario, Quebec, and country around Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay were the Montagnais, the Algonquins and the Huron. Champlain was a Christian man who felt that the soul was the only thing that mattered on Earth and that the souls of these Montagnais, Algonquin, and Huron must be saved. As a result, in 1614 Champlain invited the Recollects from France to spread the word of the true God, to convert the native inhabitants, and to save their souls from eternal damnation in New France. However, in 1624 the French Recollects realized that the magnitude of their task was too much to bear alone and that they would need more missionary bodies. The Recollects sent a delegate to France to invite the Society of Jesus to help them with their mission. The invitation was accepted and Jesuits, Jean de Brebeuf, Ennemond Masse and Charles Lalemant arrived in Quebec in 1625.

The 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot, better known under its later name, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, has long been associated with Canada. After Braddock’s defeat by the French and Indians in 1755, authority was granted to raise a regiment of four battalions to be recruited in Germany and from German colonists in North America. The regiment was named the 62nd, or Royal American, Regiment of Foot; but it was re-designated the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot in February 1757. Recruiting for the Royal Americans in North America was disappointing, and more than half its strength was drafted from men rejected by British regiments in Ireland. From this unlikely collection of foreigners and cast-offs was fashioned one of the most renowned corps of the British Army.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Battle of the Plains of Abraham

The Louisbourg Grenadiers was a temporary unit of grenadiers formed by General James Wolfe in 1759 to serve with British Army forces in the Quebec campaign of the Seven Years’ War.

Grenadiers from the 22nd, 40th, and 45th regiments were brought together by Wolfe at the Fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia in preparation for action along the St. Lawrence River. The unit was involved in numerous battles during the months-long prelude to the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, including the ill-fated Battle of Beauport on July 31, 1759.

After Quebec City’s capture, the Grenadiers went on to be involved in the fall of Montreal the next year. After the end of the Seven Years’ War, the unit was disbanded and its members returned to their original regiments.



Battle of the Plains of Abraham

Jacobite Rebellion 1745

The Royal Ecossais was raised by John Drummond in 1744 and disbanded 1763.

Their organisation was to be based on that of the Irish regiments ,to be made up of 11 companies of fusiliers and 1 of grenadiers each of 50 men plus officers for a total of 660 effectives. The officers and men used to form the regiment came from several different sources, firstly from Scotsmen serving in the Irish regiments, Scottish exiles living in France together with recruits smuggled out of Scotland. With an effective of 500 men and officers assembled at St.Omer, with John Lord Drummond as lieutenant colonel, (as for all Royal Regiments, the King of France was always the colonel ) although Lord Drummond wrote on the 29th December 1744 that he was missing only 10 men to complete the regiment.

This regiment, as many other foreign regiments in the French Army were not mercenaries as is often claimed, they were more often than not political or religious refugees who could not safely return to their homeland for fear of persecution.

The regiment had a strength of 350 men at the Battle of Culloden on the16th of April 1746 were they were in the second line and later they helped to cover the retreat of the Highlanders right wing, an attempt by Argyll Militia to interfere was pushed aside but in the skirmish the two battalions became separated and one , probably the 2nd battalion, was caught and surrounded by British Dragoons and forced to surrender in Inverness, the other one, together with their colours continued its retreat towards Ruthven Barracks and did not surrender until the 19th of April.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Thomas Gunn New Releases For March 2015!

February 21st, 2015

French & Indian Wars



French & Indian Wars

African Wars



African Wars

World War One



World War One

WWII German forces



WWII German forces

WWII Allied Forces



WWII Allied Forces

WWII Pacific



WWII Pacific

First Legion New Releases For March 2015!

February 21st, 2015

Persian Empire

First Legion is very pleased present the warriors the Persian Empire! Whether under the command of Xerxes or Darius serving in Greece or in what is now modern day Turkey against Alexander the Great, these wonderfully colorful and intricately detailed figures really capture in stunning miniature the military forces of the Persian Empire. With 16 figures representing Immortals, Archers, Light Infantry, and heavily armed warriors with command, these new figures make a fantastic and much needed addition to our World of the Greeks figure range.



Persian Empire

Battle of Normandy



Battle of Normandy

New King & Country Releases February 2015!

February 3rd, 2015

Battle of Little Big Horn


  • TRW072(P) — Crow Scout “Curly” – “Curly” (1856-1926) was a Crow Scout during the Sioux Wars…Although he did not fight in the battle, he watched it develop and was the first to report Custer’s disastrous encounter with the Sioux and Cheyenne. Here, we show him, wearing a corporal’s uniform jacket and carrying an army carbine.
  • TRW073(P) — War Shield – A mounted Arapaho ally of the Sioux and Cheyenne at the battle he gallops forward eager to come to grips with the hated “Long Knives”.
  • TRW074(P) — Black Hawk – This Northern Cheyenne was well-known for his accuracy with a bow and arrow and was reputed to have killed Tom Custer, the General’s younger brother.
  • TRW075 — Dead Trooper…Dead Horse – Both rider and mount have met their fatal end on the banks of the Little Big Horn…
  • TRW076 — Shocked and Stunned – A wounded cavalry trooper sits down in shock as blood pours from his wounds.


Battle of Little Big Horn June 25/26, 1876.

Remember The Alamo!


Back in 2013 when we completed the installation of the 70 square foot diorama of
the Battle of the Alamo for the “Briscoe Museum of Western Art” they requested us to design and produce a small range of “Alamo” related figures that could be
sold through their gift store.

The target audience was young people, general tourists and other visitors rather than dedicated toy soldier enthusiasts.

We experimented with resin, plastic and metal and eventually decided that metal was ultimately the best to use and paint. We also decided that to keep the price point relatively modest they could not be painted with the same detail as other K&C figures. However the carving style and size would be similar.

We also wanted to combine these figures into small, boxed sets of 2 and 3 figures that could all tell at least a part of the Alamo story. Here are the first 4 sets…

  • RTA093 — The Fighting Mexicans – 3 different Mexican Infantrymen in action poses.
  • RTA094 — The Davy Crockett Set – Out of ammunition, the famous Frontiersman swings the butt of his rifle and knocks down two of the enemy infantry…their discarded muskets are included.
  • RTA095 — The Duellists – The Alamo’s commander, Colonel William C. Travis died on the perimeter wall of the little mission…Some say he was shot others that he fought with his sabre against a Mexican Officer before being bayonetted himself.
  • RTA096 — The Riflemen – Two of the defenders making every shot count in the doomed battle…

SPECIAL NOTE: Among other sets in preparation are:,

General Santa Anna, The Death of Jim Bowie, Mexican Artillery and more Mexican Infantry and Alamo Defenders!


Remember the Alamo

AN OLDER RED ARMY!?!


Collectors of our “Imperial Collection” featuring the Emperor’s own bodyguard have been requesting another of the famous Regiments of the Royal Household Brigade…The red-coated men of “The Dragon Regiment”. Assigned to protect the Emperor at all times and all places. Consisting of about 1500 men the Regiment included skilled swordsmen and spearmen as well as archers, musketeers and a small group of cavalry.



The Imperial Chinese Collection

Western Front


It’s back to the trenches of the Western Front with a pair of “double” releases to add to our First World War soldiers…

  • FW185 — Les Deux Heros – Based on a famous painting by WW1 French War Artist Georges Scott a “Poilu” carries his wounded officer to safety.
  • FW187 — Back from the Front – A wounded “Tommy” and his equally injured German prisoner make their painful way towards a Casualty Clearing Station.



France 1917

A DIFFERENT KIND OF VEHICLE…


Back in 2013 on a visit to China we discovered a small workshop making all kinds
of all-metal, tinplate vehicles and other models…One of the models we saw was a little tram almost identical to the ones that still run on the streets of Hong Kong. And so, we gave them a design of an old turn-of-the-century Hong Kong tram and asked them to make a few samples…This they did and we sold them immediately. We produced some more and they also quickly sold out.

Among their other models were some Chinese Army trucks and cars. Why not, we suggested to the workshop, try a few other military models and gave them the famous WW2 GMC “Deuce and a Half”. Well, now we’ve got the first small batch of them and I think they’re great!

In fairness these models will not be for every collector…they lack some of the detail of our mixed media fighting vehicles – No glass in the windows for instance. BUT they’re tough, sturdy and have a unique and original style all of their own that I truly believe works well with our other models and figures. We only have a limited number so if you’re interested…grab ‘em while you can!

  • TP001 — GMC CCKW 353 Truck – This all-metal model can accommodate seated figures in the rear of the vehicle and has a towing hook that can pull trailers, water wagons and even artillery.



D-Day ’44

“NORMANDY ‘44”


Along the length and breadth of the entire French coastline the Germans waited
(and expected) an Allied Invasion…But where…and when? To help bolster their defences in France and elsewhere in occupied Europe the Germans made full use of
captured weaponry…guns, artillery and vehicles. K&C present three of these additions..

  • WS296 — FT-17 Normandy Pillbox – The Germans used a wide range of pillboxes and bunkers all along France’s Channel and Atlantic coast among them a small 3 man bunker surmounted by the turret of an obsolete FT-17 tank. Their only change…replace the original French gun with an MG34 machine gun.
  • WS298 — Renault FT-17 #122 – 150 Produced – After the fall of France almost 2,000 FT-17’s fell into German hands many were scrapped…some were decapitated and converted into pillbox/bunkers…a few hundred were repainted and utilized on “internal security” duties complete with German Panzer Crews mostly in France and the Balkans. Just 150 of #122 are being produced.
  • WS319 — Renault FT-17 #121 – 150 Produced – As above but with alternative number for collectors who require more than one of these great little vehicles! Again just 150 of #121 being produced.



Normandy ’44 – Waffen-SS & Wehrmacht

RED ARMY RETURN


Over the last couple of years there has been a lot of renewed interest among collectors and manufacturers in the war on the Eastern Front. K&C is one company that has been regularly releasing Red Army Soldiers and fighting vehicles to meet that interest and demand…Here’s the latest…

  • RA028 — Russian Tanker with Map – Dressed in black overalls and wearing the distinctive padded, armoured vehicle helmet this officer is studying his map.
  • RA029 — Winter Tanker with PPSH – Wearing a warm sheepskin coat and carrying his machine pistol this tanker is taking the opportunity of a halt to stretch his legs.
  • RA057 — The SU-76M Self Propelled Gun – The SU-76 was a Soviet designed Self-Propelled Gun used during and after WW2. Its simple construction made it the second-most produced Russian armoured vehicle after the T34. Red Army crews liked it for its reliability and ease-of-use and nick-named it the “Golozhopiy Ferdinand” (the bare-arsed Ferdinand). Our model includes one gunner who can fit inside the rear fighting compartment.
  • RA058 — SU-76M Crew – Two additional crew members for the SU-76…One more gunner holding a shell and a seated vehicle commander observing the enemy
    through his binos…Perfect add-ons!



Russian Front Winter 1941

Scenic and Diorama


When we launched our new set of “Desert Wall” Sections a few months back some of our collectors suggested that we do a “conversion” and repaint these to represent walls that could be used in a European-style display/diorama with some of our existing buildings. We thought it was a great idea and so we had a little set painted-up and liked the results. So, here they are…

  • SP066 — European Walls Set – Five very useful wall sections that can be added to any of our European facades and buildings to enlarge a scene and/or create a courtyard or farmyard display.



Diorama and Scenic Building Collection

New First Legion Releases February 2015

February 1st, 2015

First Legion – Napoleonic French 45th Line Infantry


First Legion presents you with the French Grande Armee! Now our third major release of French Line Infantry (fourth if you count the French Legere!) for the first time we have created line infantry specifically for Waterloo and the 100 days campaign. The French 45th Regiment of the Line is one of the storied regiments of the Grande Armee having been engaged from Valmy in 1792 all the way through Waterloo in 1815 and almost everywhere in between. At Waterloo it was part of Marcognet’s Division of D’Erlon’s Corps. With the 200th Anniversary of Waterloo just months away, we’ve decided to commemorate the battle with this creative release. The figures are designed such that they can be displayed in “March Attack” during the battle itself or “marching on campaign” in the days leading up to the battle. We have even done two variants of the standard bearer to facilitate this, with versions of the standard both furled for campaign marching and unfurled for use attacking the English at Waterloo. We have done the figures in a mix of the 1813-1815 Bardin coat in full dress and campaign dress.


French 45th Line Infantry

New Collectors Showcase Releases for February

February 1st, 2015

Roman Collection



Roman Collection

American Civil War – Confederates



American Civil War

Napoleonic – Kings German Legion



Napoleonic – King’s German Legion

WWI – German Wirbelwind


Full diorama package. Box contains : Optional thrown track, Three crew,
Horizontal trajectory kit. Empty crew seat option and more.


World War II Collection

John Jenkins – New Releases January

February 1st, 2015

JJ DESIGNS COLLECTORS’ CLUB 2015, MEMBERSHIP FIGURES

This coming year, there will be a choice of 6 Membership figures. Each Membership set also includes the following;

THE 2014 COLLECTORS CLUB ANNUAL, AND PRODUCT LIST SUPPLEMENT

THE 2015 CALENDAR

THE ADVENTURES OF BILLY BISHOP, A Graphic Novel by Alex Credidio

JJCLUB-2015A

The 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot, better known under its later name, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, has long been associated with Canada. After Braddock’s defeat by the French and Indians in 1755, authority was granted to raise a regiment of four battalions to be recruited in Germany and from German colonists in North America. The regiment was named the 62nd, or Royal American, Regiment of Foot; but it was re-designated the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot in February 1757. Recruiting for the Royal Americans in North America was disappointing, and more than half its strength was drafted from men rejected by British regiments in Ireland. From this unlikely collection of foreigners and cast-offs was fashioned one of the most renowned corps of the British Army.

JJCLUB-2015B

‘Blackrobes’ was the name given to Catholic priests in the New World by the Native Americans, referring to their distinctive clothing.
The Canadian movie “Black Robe” was the inspiration for this figure. For those interested in this figure, please check out the movie

The Society of Jesus is a Christian male religious congregation of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits.

With the discovery and colonization of New France during the 17th century, the Society of Jesus and the Jesuits played an active role in Canada. When Samuel de Champlain was placing the foundations of the French colony at Quebec, he realized that this land was inhabited by native tribes that possessed their own languages, customs and traditions. These natives that inhabited modern day Ontario, Quebec, and country around Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay were the Montagnais, the Algonquins and the Huron. Champlain was a Christian man who felt that the soul was the only thing that mattered on Earth and that the souls of these Montagnais, Algonquin, and Huron must be saved. As a result, in 1614 Champlain invited the Recollects from France to spread the word of the true God, to convert the native inhabitants, and to save their souls from eternal damnation in New France. However, in 1624 the French Recollects realized that the magnitude of their task was too much to bear alone and that they would need more missionary bodies. The Recollects sent a delegate to France to invite the Society of Jesus to help them with their mission. The invitation was accepted and Jesuits, Jean de Brebeuf, Ennemond Masse and Charles Lalemant arrived in Quebec in 1625.

JJCLUB-2015C

With World War I stalled on the Western Front by 1915, the Allied Powers were debating going on the offensive in another region of the conflict, rather than continuing with attacks in Belgium and France. Early that year, Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas appealed to Britain for aid in confronting a Turkish invasion in the Caucasus. (The Ottoman Empire had entered World War I on the side of the Central Powers, Germany and Austria-Hungary, by November 1914.) In response, the Allies decided to launch a naval expedition to seize the Dardanelles Straits, a narrow passage connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara in northwestern Turkey. If successful, capture of the straits would allow the Allies to link up with the Russians in the Black Sea, where they could work together to knock Turkey out of the war.

The Gallipoli Campaign of 1915-16, also known as the Battle of Gallipoli or the Dardanelles Campaign, was an unsuccessful attempt by the Allied Powers to control the sea route from Europe to Russia during World War I. The campaign began with a failed naval attack by British and French ships on the Dardanelles Straits in February-March 1915 and continued with a major land invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula on April 25, involving British and French troops as well as divisions of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC). Lack of sufficient intelligence and knowledge of the terrain, along with a fierce Turkish resistance, hampered the success of the invasion. By mid-October, Allied forces had suffered heavy casualties and had made little headway from their initial landing sites. Evacuation began in December 1915, and was completed early the following January.

JJCLUB-2015D

The United States of America declared war against Germany and the Central Powers on 6th April 1917. Spurred by the slogan “First to Fight” there was a rush of recruits into the Marine Corps. The newborn Marine Corps Reserve, mobilized on 16 April, contributed three officers and thirty-three enlisted men. The recruit depots at Parris Island and Mare Island were soon swamped, and temporary recruiting centers had to be opened at Philadelphia, Brooklyn, and Norfolk Navy Yards. On 14 May, six thousand acres were leased at Quantico, south of Washington, as the beginnings of a major new base.

Maj. Gen. Cmdt. George Barnett was determined that a Marine expeditionary force would be on board the first convoy to sail for France. On 29 May, President Wilson approved the sending of a Marine regiment equipped as infantry. The stipulation was that the Marine regiment be organized and equipped according to the new wartime tables of organization developed by the Army. Marine regiments were small units of about eight hundred to a thousand men, a collection of numbered rifle companies of about 100 men each.
The companies would have to be brought up to a strength of about 250 men and organized into battalions and then into regiments, with machinegun companies added.

JJCLUB-2015R and JJCLUB-2015H

The Wars of the Roses were a series of dynastic wars for the throne of England. They were fought between supporters of two rival branches of the royal House of Plantagenet, the houses of Lancaster and York. They were fought in several sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487, although there was related fighting before and after this period. The conflict resulted from social and financial troubles that followed the Hundred Years’ War, combined with the mental infirmity and weak rule of Henry VI, which revived interest in the alternative claim to the throne of Richard, Duke of York.

The final victory went to a Lancastrian claimant, Henry Tudor, who defeated the last Yorkist king, Richard III, at the Battle of Bosworth Field. After assuming the throne as Henry VII, Henry Tudor married Elizabeth of York, the daughter of Edward IV, thereby uniting the two houses. In an era leading to what is sometimes referred to as the “Golden Age” of Elizabeth, the House of Tudor ruled England and Wales until 1603.



John Jenkins Collectors Club

THE RAID ON ST. FRANCIS 1959

The 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot, better known under its later name, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, has long been associated with Canada. After Braddock’s defeat by the French and Indians in 1755, authority was granted to raise a regiment of four battalions to be recruited in Germany and from German colonists in North America. The regiment was named the 62nd, or Royal American, Regiment of Foot; but it was re-designated the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot in February 1757. Recruiting for the Royal Americans in North America was disappointing, and more than half its strength was drafted from men rejected by British regiments in Ireland. From this unlikely collection of foreigners and cast-offs was fashioned one of the most renowned corps of the British Army.



Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

THE JACOBITE REBELLION 1745

Barrell’s was on the left of the front line. The fighting opened with an exchange of artillery fire which prompted the highlanders to start running towards the British lines so that they were not standing targets. They fell upon the British left so that Barrell’s (and Munro’s 37th) took the brunt of the charge. The Scots ranks were severely thinned out as they ran forward, by grapeshot and at least two volleys from Barrell’s and Munro’s. The Scots had discarded their muskets and were now armed with pistols, swords and shields.

There is no doubt that Barrell’s regiment did most of the fighting that day. The men fixed bayonets and were ordered to lunge at the Highlander on their right rather than the man approaching their front. In this way they were able to strike a blow behind their shields rather than having a bayonet stuck in the shield. The casualty figures show how bravely they fought before being forced back. 17 killed and 108 wounded, by far the greatest number out of all the regiments.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

THE WAR OF 1812

This period was full of activity for the Marines. Starting with the fights with the Barbary corsairs, and continuing throughout the War of 1812. The Marines were to take part in virtually every action at sea, on the Great Lakes, and also in many engagements on land. A section of the line at New Orleans were held by the Marines at this battle. Therefore they were extremely active despite the strength of the corps only averaging about 1,000 officers and men.



Battle of Chippewa – War of 1812

WWI – British

Official gun drill allocated certain tasks to each of the members of a gun detachment. In action on the Western front, detachments were frequently under strength because of casualties or because men were being withdrawn to the rear for a rest.

CREW DUTIES OF A 6-INCH HOWITZER DETACHMENT.

NUMBER 1: Commands the “gun”. Selects the ground for the gun platform. Lays for elevation and passes angle for dial sight and deflection to No.4. Supervises ramming and gives order to fire. Fits and removes rocking bar sight with No.4.

NUMBER 4: Lays (aims) the gun, with No1. Removes and replaces sight cover. Assists No.1 fitting rocking bar sight. Clamps dial sight, fits clinometer. Directs No.6 planting night-firing picket and aiming posts.



British Forces

WWI – French Army

The Renault FT, was a French light tank that was among the most revolutionary and influential tank designs in history. The FT was the first production tank to have its armament within a fully rotating turret. The Renault FT’s configuration – crew compartment at the front, engine compartment at the back, and main armament in a revolving turret – became and remains the standard tank layout. Over 3,000 Renault FT tanks were manufactured by French industry, most of them during the year 1918.
Armoured warfare historian Steven Zaloga has called the Renault FT “the world’s first modern tank.”

The original one piece cast turret, had many problems, mainly in that it only permitted a Hotchkiss machine gun to be mounted. Research led to the design of what was to be known as the “Omnibus”. This turret allowed for mounting either the Puteaux cannon or the Hotchkiss machine gun. This turret was assembled of flat steel plates screwed to a frame and was shaped like an octagonal prism that narrowed towards the top.

The Mle 1914 Hotchkiss machine gun chambered for the 8mm Lebel cartridge became the standard machine gun of the French Army during World War I. The Hotchkiss machine gun, a sturdy and reliable weapon, remained in active service with the French army until the early 1940s. By the end of 1918, 47,000 Hotchkiss machine guns had already been delivered to the French army alone. If one adds the international sales, the total number of Hotchkiss machine guns that were manufactured in various calibers is close to 100.000.

The Puteaux SA 18 was a French single-shot, breech-loading cannon, used from World War I onward, primarily mounted on combat vehicles.

It was a simple, reliable weapon with a high rate of fire made possible by a semi-automatic breech system . It was primarily intended to be used against infantry and machine-gun nests, due to its low muzzle velocity which proscribed anti-armour use. Though armour penetration was poor, even as late as 1939 it was sufficient to combat light armoured vehicles. The gun was operated by one soldier, and found easy to use with a low incidence of jamming. It was sighted on target with a separate scope attached to the left side of the weapon.

Within the first six months of the First World War, more than 1.3 million prisoners were held in Europe. Accommodating so many POWs was a huge problem for all countries involved. Allegations of cruelty and neglect were commonplace.

Treaties covering the treatment of POWs were agreed before the war (the Hague and Geneva Conventions), but German propaganda reported widely on the brutality of Allied camps to encourage their soldiers to fight to the death as a preference to being captured. Likewise, in Britain, it was claimed that Allied prisoners in Germany were systematically persecuted by order of the German government. Inspectors from neutral countries were called upon to check on camp conditions.

When war was declared in 1914, there was no system in place on either side for dealing with POWs. Camps were hastily set up according to need. Many camps were built from scratch but existing buildings were also utilised. The early camps were found to be over-crowded, though this situation improved in Britain once makeshift camps were replaced. Complaints about German camps centred on inadequate sanitation, housing and food (for which the Allied naval blockade was partly responsible), the nature of work assigned to prisoners and the brutal behaviour of the guards. POWs in Turkish camps, except for officers, were treated particularly harshly.



French Army

Thomas Gunn New Releases Expected January 2015!

January 13th, 2015

French & Indian Wars


New Releases Expected Late January / February 2015!

  • FIW002B — Standing Rifleman – Standing Rifleman this time without fixed bayonet and campaign style hat with feathers! Scale for this range is 54mm to
    fit in with Britain’s and JJD figures.
  • FIW007 — Kneeling Rifleman – A kneeling rifleman looks left before preparing to move off. Scale for this range is 54mm to fit in with Britain’s and
    JJD figures



French & Indian Wars

African Wars




African Wars

French Foreign Legion

  • FFL034A — Prone firing rifleman – A prone firing rifleman, this time we have gone for a different look with our legionnaire wearing just his shirt and
    backpack instead of the blue greatcoat.
  • FFL035A — Guard – A very useful figure for guarding your camp/fort/artillery piece or any other number of useful diorama settings.



French Foreign Legion

World War One




World War One

WWII Allied Forces


Captain Edwin Swales VC was a South African pilot seconded to the RAF from the SAAF. He was attached to 582 Sqn Pathfinders and was the lead Pathfinder aircraft on the night of 23rd February 1945 when he was awarded his VC.

Swales was flying an Avro Lancaster and was part of a 370 strong forces of Lancasters bombing Pforzheim that night.

During the raid Swales aircraft was attacked by an ME110 which knocked out 2 of the Lancasters engines. Although Swales knew his aircraft would not make it back to ‘Blighty’ he
endeavored to get the aircraft as far back inside friendly territory as possible, so that the crew could bail out safely. As they crossed the French border Swales ordered his crew to abandon the aircraft, no sooner had they all parachuted to safety then the aircraft stalled and crashed into the ground killing Swales.

Swales was awarded the Victoria Cross for extreme gallantry and selflessly putting his crews life before his own.

Club 18 will come in 2 versions: A standard RAF blue uniform colour scheme for January and a B version for February with Swales wearing tropical style trousers.

As Swales was a keen sportsman who excelled at Rugby as well as other sports we have sculpted Swales in relaxed dress, ready to stroll out to the cricket pitch and knock out a few ‘Sixes’ with his crew.



WWII Allied Forces

WWII German forces


  • FJ014A — The Breakfast Club – Featuring Rolf Jager and Rudolf Witzig: Two new well known FJ’s (both Knights Cross recipients) this time in a more relaxed mode around a camp fire cooking an egg for breakfast! Set comes complete with the two figures, MP40′s, FJ Helmets, bottle of beer and cooking fire. There will be a part 2 very soon for this set, featuring two more KC winners to go with the above figures.



WWII German forces

WWII Pacific


  • RS002B — Japanese Marine Sentry – Our last Japanese Marine sentry sold out very quickly and we have therefore released a new version but very similar to
    the first! This new soldier is actually from the army and he wears the soft cap with Japanese yellow star embroided on the cap.



WWII Pacific

King & Country January 2015 Releases!

January 13th, 2015

Battle of the Bulge – GI’s


Usually, K&C release all of our “Battle of the Bulge” figures and vehicles in October and November in the run-up to December and the annual anniversary of
this battle. Alas, pressure of other releases meant that our GI’s had to wait till this month. However, they’re a wee bit different and, I hope, well worth
the wait…

  • BBA074 — Radio Operator Set – Two full-body GI’s huddle behind their snow-frosted, sand-bagged emplacement. As one GI aims his M1 carbine the other
    is using the radio handset.
  • BBA075 — Bar Gunner Set – Two “half-body” GI’s, one firing his B.A.R. (Browning Automatic Rifle) the other holding onto his helmet come under enemy
    fire as they shelter in their foxhole. This sets work well on a flat surface or even better, on a snow-covered diorama landscape.
  • BBA076 — Supporting Fire – Another two “half-body” GI’s provide additional fire power with their M1 Garand rifle and M1 carbine from their foxhole. This
    sets work well on a flat surface or even better, on a snow-covered diorama landscape.
  • BBA077 — Observing The Battle – As one “half-body” GI watches the enemy through his binos, the other GI waits ready with his rifle. (2 x half body figures). This sets work well on a flat surface or even better, on a snow-covered diorama landscape.
  • BBA078 — Sitting Wounded Set – A greatcoat-clad Medic tends to the leg wound of a sitting GI.
  • BBA079 — Seriously Wounded Set – Another U.S. Army Medic leans over and supports a badly-wounded GI with a stomach wound…
  • BBA080 — DODGE WS51 Weapons Carrier (Winter Ambulance) – This ubiquitous little Weapons Carrier has been turned into a temporary ambulance to help
    “ferry” the wounded back to the nearest field hospital. Our model has a detachable canvas cover and a seated ambulance driver figure.


Battle of the Bulge

Napoleonic Gordon Highlanders


As many collectors of the Napoleonic Era know you can never have too many Scottish Highlanders!!! These 10 all-new “Gordon Highlanders” prove that statement…All
are in action poses that can supplement and complement existing Highlander collections or can form the basis for a brand-new collection!

SPECIAL NOTE: As you can see no less than three of the previous figures have head wounds…Statistically the British Infantry, especially when formed up in squares, suffered a disproportionate number of head wounds as enemy cavalry in particular swung their swords and lances at the heads of the defending soldiers.


Gordon Highlanders

English Civil War


A few more colourful additions to this great new series…


English Civil War – Pike & Musket

Streets of Old Hong Kong



Orient

Crusader

Two more colourful additions to the Crusaders’ Camp…

  • MK141 — The German Tent – With the Germanic-style eagle at the top and the simple black and white colours this little tented structure belongs to a
    Knight from north of the Rhine.
  • MK142 — The English Tent – A simple red on white crusader cross
    and the colours signify the presence of an English Knight.



Crusader – Cross & Crescent

World of Dickens


Alas, this yuletide version of our corner store just missed out on this year’s festive season…but it’s well in time for next year’s!!!

  • WoD019 — The Christmas Store – Full of blooms and Christmas trees this little corner piece will make a great add-on to the already released “World
    of Dickens” Display Pieces.



World of Dickens

Russian Generals


Three of the most famous Soviet Leaders during WW2…

  • RA059 — Marshal Georgy Zhukov – Stalin’s finest General who came up through the ranks the hard way to reach supreme command and lead the Soviet Forces to
    victory in Berlin, May 1945.
  • RA060 — Marshal Stalin – A great leader of his nation and also a ruthless dictator who killed millions of his own countrymen. Here, dressed in
    a simple, white summer uniform…Like his opponent Hitler, he preferred a simple style of uniform with few if any decorations and medals.
  • RA061 — Kommissar Nikita Kruschev – The senior political officer in and during the Battle of Stalingrad from late 1942 to early 1943. He
    went on to become Premier of the USSR from 1957-1964.



Russian Front Winter 1941

Royal Airforce

  • RAF051 — The Royal Air Force Jeep – A very much requested item for any RAF airfield…anywhere! Our RAF blue vehicle has a Flight Sergeant behind the wheel and the RAF roundel on the bonnet of the engine.



Royal Airforce

WWII – German


During the “Battle of France” in 1940 as refugees fled their villages, towns and farms…they left behind all kinds of livestock to fend for themselves!

  • WH001 — Fresh Milk Today! – Two former farm-boys know a thing or two about animals. Here, as one “soldaten” milks the cow into a wooden bucket,
    the other enjoys a mess tin full of fresh milk…delicious!
  • WH011 — Dispatch Rider – Perhaps sitting on his bike on a nearby road this other German soldier stops to take a break and watch his two
    comrades at work in the field.
  • WS198 — Feld Gendarmerie Dog Handler – On duty with guard and dog.


World War II