King & Country New English Civil War – Pike & Musket Additions

October 13th, 2014


Just announced 4 x Two-Figure “Fighting Doubles” in their own 2 figure boxes.


English Civil War – Pike & Musket

Air Force 1 Northrop P-61B Black Widow – In Stock Now!

October 12th, 2014

Air Force 1

The heavily-armed Black Widow—the United States’ first aircraft specifically designed as a night-fighter—first flew on May 21st, 1942. The P-61 had four forward-firing 20mm cannons and a dorsal turret housing four .50-caliber machine guns. The radar equipment in its nose enabled its crew to locate and attack enemy aircraft in total darkness. The twin boom arrangements housed two Pratt & Whitney turbocharged engines and were joined at rear by a large plane and twin rudder formation. The pilot was seated in the main fuselage, with the gunner immediately behind him and the radar operator at the rear of the gondola.


Air Force 1

John Jenkins Collectors Club – New!

October 12th, 2014

JJ DESIGNS COLLECTORS’ CLUB SET#18 – Lieutenant General Marquis de Montcalm

Montcalm began his military career at the age of nine when he was commissioned an ensign in the army. He gained significant military experience in the War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748) and was wounded several times.

In May 1756 Montcalm was appointed major general and commander of French forces in New France. Over the next three years, the forces under Montcalm’s leadership enjoyed considerable success in North America forcing the English at Oswego to surrender on August 14, 1756 and capturing Fort William Henry after a six-day siege ending on August 9, 1757.

In the summer of 1758 General Montcalm commanded a force of 3,700 French soldiers at Fort Carillon (Ticonderoga). On July 7, as a British force of 17,000 troops were preparing to attack the Fort, Montcalm set his army to work constructing a thick log defensive wall about a half mile to the west of the Fort. On the morning of July 8th, his defensive works were attacked. At the end of the day, his army held strong repelling the British and securing for France its greatest victory of the French & Indian War

This will be the Second Special Collectors’ club set for 2014.

Please note that there will be a 30 day PREVIEW period, when the Special Collectors’ Club set will be shown as an unpainted prototype.

There will be a further 30 day PREORDER period when a picture of the painted figure will be released.

The number of PREORDERS received at this time will be the LIMITED EDITION of that special Collectors’ Club set.

Production of the figure will then take approximately 30-90 days.

Deadline for placing your order October 31th 2014!

JJ DESIGNS COLLECTORS’ CLUB SET#19 – Jacobite Rebellion 1745, Regiment Royal Ecossois, Officer with Colonel’s Colours.

The Royal Ecossais was raised by John Drummond in 1744 and disbanded 1763.

Their organisation was to be based on that of the Irish regiments ,to be made up of 11 companies of fusiliers and 1 of grenadiers each of 50 men plus officers for a total of 660 effectives. The officers and men used to form the regiment came from several different sources, firstly from Scotsmen serving in the Irish regiments, Scottish exiles living in France together with recruits smuggled out of Scotland. With an effective of 500 men and officers assembled at St.Omer, with John Lord Drummond as lieutenant colonel, (as for all Royal Regiments, the King of France was always the colonel ) although Lord Drummond wrote on the 29th December 1744 that he was missing only 10 men to complete the regiment.

This regiment, as many other foreign regiments in tjhe French Army were not mercenaries as is often claimed, they were more often than not political or religious refugees who could not safely return to their homeland for fear of persecution.

The regiment had a strength of 350 men at the Battle of Culloden on the16th of April 1746 were they were in the second line and later they helped to cover the retreat of the Highlanders right wing, an attempt by Argyll Militia to interfere was pushed aside but in the skirmish the two battalions became separated and one , probably the 2nd battalion, was caught and surrounded by British Dragoons and forced to surrender in Inverness, the other one, together with their colours continued its retreat towards Ruthven Barracks and did not surrender until the 19th of April.

An Officer with the Regimental Colours will be a general release in January 2015.

This will be the Third Special Collectors’ club set for 2014.

Please note that there will be a 30 day PREVIEW period, when the Special Collectors’ Club set will be shown as an unpainted prototype.

There will be a further 30 day PREORDER period when a picture of the painted figure will be released.

The number of PREORDERS received at this time will be the LIMITED EDITION of that special Collectors’ Club set.

Production of the figure will then take approximately 30-90 days.

Deadline for placing your order November 30th 2014!



John Jenkins Collectors Club

Thomas Gunn – New Releases Expected October 2014!

October 12th, 2014

French Foreign Legion – Mexico



French Foreign Legion – Mexico

African Wars


  • SFA018 — British Troopers – Two British troopers, one in the kneeling position reaches for more ammo from his bandolier and the second trooper keeps a
    look out for more Zulus in the prone position.


African Wars

Great War Series



World War One

WWII German forces



WWII German forces

WWII Pacific



WWII Pacific


Black Hawk – The Lance 1300s – New Series!

October 12th, 2014


The “Lance” was the basic tactical unit of the European feudal armies as early as the 10th century. It was still in use well into the 15th century, but it was more strictly organized, as a part of the “compagnies d’ordonnance” raised by the French king Charles VII.

The origins of the Lance are found in the retinues of medieval knights. In all probability, these units would be denominated as “Lances” attending to the close association existing between a knight and his signature weapon: the lance.

This Black Hawk presentation is an accomplished depiction of a Lance commanded by a French knight around 1330. He is shown here riding a gaited or amble horse which is trained to move faster than a walk but usually slower than a canter, resulting in a more comfortable ride on the trail. He is accompanied by his lady, which may suggest they are just in the early stages of the cavalcade and that she should be on her way back shortly, as dames were usually not expected to follow their husbands to war.

Just ahead of the knight is the destrier, a stronger horse used in battles and tournaments, led by a page. Following the knight is the loyal squire, carrying his lord’s weapons and pennant. Behind the squire are various men-at-arms, a loaded supply wagon, and even a monk on donkey back, as well as Irish Wolfhound dogs following the troupe.


The Lance 1330s


Black Hawk American West

October 12th, 2014

In Stock Now!


New additions for the Gunfight at the OK Corral and the Cowboys Collection.


Gunfight at the OK Corral

Collectors Battlefield Collection – 28MM Figures

October 12th, 2014

In Stock Now
Collectors Battlefield Collection – Operation Market Garden – 28mm


New British 1st Airboure – Operation Market Garden, 1944.


British 1st Airborne

German – 28mm Miniatures


New German Military Vehicles – Operation Market Garden, 1944.


German Gaming Miniatures

Buildings – 28mm Miniatures


Gaming Buildings


King & Country October 2014 Releases!

October 12th, 2014

INTRODUCING PIKE & MUSKET


The mighty struggle between King Charles I and his rebellious parliament.

The war, actually a series of three wars, began in 1642 and ended in 1651. It was fought between the King and his supporters (“Cavaliers”) and Parliament, eventually led by Oliver Cromwell, and his side (“Roundheads”).

The principal issue at hand was how and who should govern the country…A monarch chosen by God or a parliament chosen by the people (at least those who could vote).

The overall outcome was three-fold…The trial and execution of Charles I and the exile of his son, the future Charles II…

The abolition of the Monarchy and its replacement by a republican “Commonwealth”… And the rise and rule of Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth.

This colourful and dramatic new series “Pike & Musket” will cover many aspects of this epic struggle – both military and civilian and promises to be one of the largest and most extensive in King & Country’s history.

Our first release features Oliver Cromwell himself and men from Parliament’s “New Model Army”…

  • PnM001 — Parliamentary Officer with Halberd and Pistol – Among Parliament’s troops many of the officers were chosen by their fellow soldiers. Some had previous military experience, many did not…Trial and error and trial by battle soon sorted out the “sheep from the goats”.
  • PnM002 — Crouching Pikeman – A long pike held in the left hand this Pikeman reaches across with his right to draw his sword in a classic pose.
  • PnM003 — Present Pikeman – With pike firmly held in the horizontal position this soldier prepares to receive an enemy charge…either foot or mounted.
  • PnM004 — Vertical Pikeman – As above but with the pike held upwards.
  • PnM005 — Advancing Pikman – With one hand holding his sword and the other the pike the soldier steps forward.
  • PnM006 — Standing Pikeman – At attention with a two-handed grip on the pike.
  • PnM008 — Oliver Cromwell – Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) was the dominant personality of the English Civil War. Originally from a modest country background he rose rapidly through the Parliamentary ranks from a humble troop commander to a regimental colonel and then a Lieutenant General of Horse all within the space of two years.Although lacking any formal military education he knew instinctively how to lead and train men…and get the best from them.Eventually he would be given the title “Lord Protector”. Our figure shows him in typical military dress of the early part of the war as a Colonel of Horse. The figure is based on the statue of Cromwell to be found outside Parliament in London…Sword in one hand…bible in the other!
  • PnM009 — Firing Musketeer – The majority of muskets used in the Civil War were “matchlocks”. Our “Musketeer” uses his forked “rest” to steady his weapon. Extra ammunition was carried in a cross belt “bandoleer” which usually had 12 or more small wooden containers each with enough powder for a single round.
  • PnM010 — Advancing Musketeer – Musket and Rest in hand this soldier prepares to move forward.
  • PnM011 — Loading Musketeer – This musketeer pours the powder from its wooden container onto the barrel of his matchlock.
  • PnM012 — Regimental Flagbearer – The “Blew Regiment of the Cittie of London Trayned Bandes” was a militia regiment of about 1200 musketeers and 800 pikemen drawn from the citizens of the capitol. At the time England had no standing army so, in times of war and strife, locally trained volunteers were virtually all that was available.Upon the outbreak of war London declared for Parliament and the regiment fought in most of the notable battles of the conflict.Our flagbearer holds the standard of the 5th Captain of the Regiment.
  • PnM013 — Trooper with Pistol – This dismounted trooper carries both sword and pistol. He wears the distinctive “lobster-pot” helmet with the protective steel face visor raised. Under his armoured cuirass he wears the heavy buff leather long jacket.

Special Uniform Note:

The soldiers who fought in the English Civil War had more uniformity than their Continental contemporaries in the “Thirty Years War”…What uniformity they had was very much up to the tastes and pockets of individual colonels who raised each regiment.

Most officers wore their own personal civilian clothes. The rank and file however was issued with certain items such as coats, breeches, various headgear (including helmets) and of course, shoes, boots and stockings – subject to availability.

Blue and red were the most common uniform colours although white, grey and green were also seen in both armies. In effect this means that what we call “Parliamentary” with this first release can alternatively “change sides” as more soldiers appear to be released in the future.

English Civil War – Pike & Musket

Battle of Little Big Horn


More Indian warriors join the battle against Custer and his 7th Cavalry…

  • TRW064 — Sioux Indian Tepee (Version #1) – The traditional Plains Indian dwelling made out of buffalo hides and individually decorated.
  • TRW068(P) — Winchester Warrior – A Cheyenne “Dog Soldier” wheels around looking for his next “long knife” opponent!
  • TRW069(P) — “Red Knife” – This well-known chief reins in his pony as he gets ready to fire.
  • TRW070(P) — The Chief- A sitting leader hears the din of battle in the distance…His warriors already have the white men on the run…There is no need to hurry.

  • TRW071(P) — “Rain-In-The-Face”
    – One of the Sioux’s most noted war-chiefs “Rain-In-The-Face” was a Lakota and famous among the tribe for his fighting ability and leadership.Here he is riding into battle, with his full eagle-feather war bonnet, rifle held over his head…Totally unafraid of the “Long Knives” or their bullets!
  • TRW083 — Sioux Indian Tepee (Version #2) – The second of two tepees that can help make you an Indian village that Custer and his men fatefully (for them) attacked.

Battle of Little Big Horn June 25/26, 1876.

”Christmas Comes But Once A Year”


Every year we try and bring out something that captures the spirit of Christmas…with a military flavor…

  • XM014-01 — Red Cross Santa – A fully-laden Santa has brought a fully-laden sack load of red cross parcels, gifts and something to drink for the troops — Hope they like it!?!
  • XM014-02 — “Merry Christmas Tommy!” – On Christmas Day 1914, the guns on the Western Front fell silent as troops from both sides left their trenches and crossed into “No Man’s Land”. Here, a “Fritz” and a “Tommy” greet each other watched over by a benevolent snowman. A poignant reminder that, for a few brief hours, peace and harmony united the two warring sides…

Christmas – Limited Edition

FRANCE 1944!


After the Normandy Invasion of June 6, 1944 there was still plenty of fighting to do before the hated Boches were driven from France.

As the Allied Armies rapidly built up and advanced out of the Normandy “bocage” all kinds of situations (and opportunities) arose that some soldiers were only too happy to take advantage of…

  • DD239 — Gang of Heroes – In every army, in every war there are always some individuals who are on the lookout for ways to enrich themselves by one way…or another. The U.S. Army was no exception!Some soldiers helped themselves to wine, women and song…Others looted valuable jewelry, paintings, ornaments, silverware – virtually anything they could lay their mitts on.A few had even bigger ambitions…they went after gold bullion!Four GI’s have an appointment with a bank manager somewhere behind German lines and intend to make a rather large withdrawal…
  • DD241 — Walking Wounded& – Even in the midst of victory there are still “casualties”…One GI helps his buddy to the nearest Aid Station.
  • DD242 — Sitting Wounded – Another GI has caught a piece of shrapnell in his knee…He sits down to take a closer look before applying a field dressing.
  • DD243 — “Cheers!” – This GI, during a lull in the battle, takes out his canteen to refresh himself…Is it water…or some of that fine French wine him and his buddies “liberated” the day before?
  • DD244 — “U.S. Army Movie Cameraman” – A companion piece to our earlier released “Combat Photographer” (DD076). This new guy belongs to the U.S. Army’s Signal Corps who had hundreds of brave photographers and movie cameramen on the front line covering all aspects of the war and “Theatres of Operations.” Our guy is armed with a vintage Bell & Howell camera…and a .45.
  • DD245 — “Back Thataways” – A walking GI indicates to the “Walking Wounded” (DD241) where the nearest Aid Station is.
  • DD246 — Supplies Medic – This Medic is “humping” some “K Rations” to help feed the hungry wounded.

D-Day ’44

Tommies!


  • DD175 — “Liberation!” – One of the more pleasant aspects of the Allied drive through France was the rapturous welcome “Tommies” and “Yanks” received when they liberated French towns and villages.Here this “Tom” is delighted to get an enthusiastic hug and a kiss from a pretty young French girl.

D-Day ’44 – British and Canadian

Operation Market Garden


Operation Market Garden

“MORE CASUALTIES OF WAR”


Since the highly successful launch, earlier this year, of German Medics, Wounded & Ambulances we decided to add a few more…

  • WH002 — “Medic & Wounded” – A German Medic drags a wounded “Soldaten” away from the battle…
  • WH003 — Out of Danger! – Another Medic and a fellow soldier pull another seriously wounded comrade out of harm’s way.
  • WH004 — Opel Blitz Ambulance (Camouflage) – The second version of this great ambulance model. This particular two-coloured Opel Blitz can be utilized in a wide variety of “combat theatres” — North Africa…Italy…Normandy…even the Eastern Front and all-points-in-between.

German Field Hospital

Normandy ’44


Normandy ’44 – Waffen-SS & Wehrmacht


New Britain’s Releases In Stock Now!

October 12th, 2014

Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection



Jack Tars & Leathernecks Collection

Zulu War


Rorke’s Drift – Matte Version

German Forces 1916 -1918



WWI German Forces 1916 -1918

Battle of the Somme – British



Battle of the Somme

American Civil War


American Civil War

New Catalogue Releases For Winter 2014!

October 12th, 2014

American Civil War

American Civil War

American Civil War – Artillery

When the Ordnance Board revised the artillery system for 1861, several new patterns emerged including the 8-inch and 10-inch Siege Mortars and the 13-inch Seacoast Mortar. The 8-inch and 10-inch Siege Mortars had maximum ranges of2,225 and 2,064 yards, respectively, and the 13-inch Seacoast Mortar had a maximum range of 4,300 yards, but their effective ranges were much shorter. These mortars saw action in many different theaters in the American Civil War and were used by both the Army and the Navy.

While guns were intended to batter down the walls of a fortification during a siege, mortars were designed to fire explosive shells over the walls of the fortification in a high arcing trajectory, destroying construction and personnel, killing the men inside, forcing others to stay in bombproof shelters, or preventing the gunners from serving their guns and repairing damage caused by the bombardment. Mortars could also destroy structures inside the fortifications which would normally stay unharmed from standard guns. Heavier mortar shells could also penetrate magazines and many bomb proof shelters. They could also be used for fire suppression against hostile siege batteries. Seacoast Mortars could penetrate the decks of wooden ships and even threaten the deck plating of ironclad vessels.

One of the most famous guns of the war was the well photographed 13-inch “Dictator,” which fired 227 pound mortar shells from a railroad platform propelled by 20 pounds of powder into the Confederate lines during the siege of Petersburg.

The official records also site that 13-inch mortars participated in the capture of Island No.10, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, and the actions against Fort Jackson, Fort Saint Philip, Fort Pillow, Fort Pemberton, Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter. The 13-inch mortars were also used in both naval and land based batteries during the siege of Vicksburg and General McClellan placed seven 13-inch mortars in Battery #4 at Yorktown.

Civil War Artillery

Clash of Empires

From the modern perspective, it is easy to look back and think of the military of the eighteenth century as being quaint, but that does them a great disservice. Then, as now, armies were complex instruments using the newest technologies of the time. During the latter part of the 18th century, advances in metallurgy and carriage design resulted in lighter field guns with the standard British Royal Artillery light 6-pounder with a bore of 3.67 inches and light 5.5 inch howitzer weighing around 1,700 lbs. The British Royal Artillery 6-pounder became one of the most widely deployed battalion guns from the wilderness of North America to the tropics of the Caribbean, the African coast, India, and the Philippines. They were also deployed in Germany, Portugal, and raided the French coast.

Smoothbore 6-pounders fired two main types of projectiles: roundshot and case shot (canister). Roundshot was a solid iron sphere hammered into shape while still hot from the mold. It was the most important and numerous projectile in service and composed approximately 70-80% of ammunition used in the field.


Clash of Empires

War on the Nile – Battle of Abu Klea, January 17, 1885

Battle of Abu Klea, January 17, 1885

Zulu War – Rorke’s Drift

Rorke’s Drift – Matte Version

WWI 1914 -1916

The Ordnance QF 13-pounder quick-firing field gun was the standard equipment of the British Royal Horse Artillery at the outbreak of World War I. The gun was developed as a response to combat experience gained in the Boer War and entered service in 1904.

The 13-pounder was intended as a rapid-firing and highly-mobile, yet reasonably powerful field gun for Royal Horse Artillery batteries attached to Cavalry divisions which were expected to be engaged in mobile open warfare.

By late 1914, however, the Western Front settled into trench warfare and the 13-pounder was found to be too light to be truly effective against prepared defensive positions. As a result, it was increasingly supplanted by the 18-pounder.

The first British artillery round on the Western Front in World War I was fired by No. 4 gun of Battery “E” Royal Horse Artillery on August 22, 1914, northeast of Harmignies in Belgium. The 13-pounder was also used to great effect by Battery “L” Royal Horse Artillery in its famous defensive action on September 1, 1914 at Néry, France, for which three Victoria Crosses were awarded.

WWI Collection 1914 – 1916

WWI German Forces 1916 -1918

WWI German Forces 1916 -1918

Christmas Truce 1914

Though there was no official truce, roughly 100,000 British and German troops were involved in unofficial cessations of fighting along the length of the Western Front during Christmas of 1914.

In the early months of static trench warfare during World War I, opposing infantry units in close proximity to each other often developed an attitude of “live and let live.” In some cases, overtly aggressive behavior ceased and troops participated in small-scale fraternization, engaging in conversation or bartering for cigarettes.

Through the week leading up to Christmas 1914, this behavior became even more widespread. On Christmas Eve, German troops began decorating their trenches with candles and putting up Christmas trees, and when the German troops began singing Christmas carols, the British responded by singing carols of their own. The two sides continued by shouting Christmas greetings back and forth between the lines and in many sectors the two sides agreed to and an unofficial truce.

On Christmas Day, many soldiers from trenches on both sides independently ventured into “no man’s land,” where they mingled and exchanged small gifts such as food, tobacco and alcohol. The truce also allowed a breathing spell where recently killed soldiers could be brought back behind their lines by burial parties and in some cases joint services were held

Troops from both sides were also friendly enough to play games of football with one another. First-hand accounts of these “friendly games” are recorded by several units including the Rifle Brigade, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, the Royal Field Artillery and The Lancashire Fusiliers.

Christmas Truce 1914

Battle of the Somme – British

Battle of the Somme