John Jenkins September Releases!

August 22nd, 2016

Battle of Monongahela, 1755


The first range produced by jjDesigns was The Battle on the Monongahela Series. This mainly consisted of the “luckless,” 44th Regiment of Foot.

The other British Line Regiment at Monongahela was the 48th Regiment of Foot.

The regiment was first raised in 1741 as James Cholmondeley’s Regiment of Foot in Norwich, England during the War of Austrian Succession.

The regiment first saw action at the Battles of Falkirk and Culloden in 1745-1746.

In 1748, it was renumbered as the 48th Regiment of Foot. The 48th took part in the French and Indian War, being part of General Edward Braddock’s ill-fated expedition of 1755.

They received their first battle honour in the Americas at the Battle of Louisburg, although the Regiment did not receive their due honour for this until 1882. The 48th was also part of General James Wolfe’s force at the capture of Quebec in 1759.

As a special 10th Anniversary Release, the 48th Regiment of Foot figures released in 2016, will be available at the original 2006 prices!



Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Jacobite Rebellion 1745


For SEPTEMBER we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with two more “BOOSTER/STARTER” Sets!

These sets will only be offered for sale until the end of October, or until stock runs out.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Speedbirds


The Thompson Trophy race was one of the National Air Races of the heyday of early airplane racing in the 1930s. Established in 1929, the last race was held in 1961. The race was 10 miles (16 km) long with 50-foot-high (15 m) pylons marking the turns, and emphasized low altitude flying and maneuverability at high speeds. As the race was flown around a closed course, crowds in the grandstands could easily see much of the spectacle.

There were two series of Thompson races. The first series followed the award of a “Thompson Cup” in the 1929 National Air Races to the winner of the “International Land Plane Free-For-All” (that is, the unlimited class race). Thompson Products (a predecessor to TRW) decided to sponsor a trophy to be awarded for the next ten years for unlimited class racing (though a stipulation was eventually added excluding women pilots). The trophy was designed by Walter Sinz and is now at Air and Space Museum. Sinz also made a pair of 10-foot-tall (3.0 m) models of the trophy for promotional purposes. Races were held for the next ten years, ending in 1939. Further races in this series were precluded by the onset of war.

After World War II the original trophy was (according to stipulation) retired. Also, advances in airplane technology, especially the advent of the turbojet, complicated matters. It was decided to establish a new series, with “R” (piston engine) and “J” (jet-powered) divisions. The “R” class was for civilian competition; the “J” division was for military pilots and was administered by the United States Air Force. Roscoe Turner, the last winner of the pre-war trophy, refused to relinquish it, but the original molds were located, and two additional casts were made, differing only in the legend engraved at the base and by placards identifying the division. Division “R” races were held from 1946 to 1949; Division “J” races (also known as “Military Speed Dashes”) were held from 1951 to 1961, excepting 1952 and 1960.

The Thompson Trophy race was one of the National Air Races of the heyday of early airplane racing in the 1930s. Established in 1929, the last race was held in 1961. The race was 10 miles (16 km) long with 50-foot-high (15 m) pylons marking the turns, and emphasized low altitude flying and maneuverability at high speeds. As the race was flown around a closed course, crowds in the grandstands could easily see much of the spectacle.

There were two series of Thompson races. The first series followed the award of a “Thompson Cup” in the 1929 National Air Races to the winner of the “International Land Plane Free-For-All” (that is, the unlimited class race). Thompson Products (a predecessor to TRW) decided to sponsor a trophy to be awarded for the next ten years for unlimited class racing (though a stipulation was eventually added excluding women pilots). The trophy was designed by Walter Sinz and is now at Air and Space Museum. Sinz also made a pair of 10-foot-tall (3.0 m) models of the trophy for promotional purposes. Races were held for the next ten years, ending in 1939. Further races in this series were precluded by the onset of war.

After World War II the original trophy was (according to stipulation) retired. Also, advances in airplane technology, especially the advent of the turbojet, complicated matters. It was decided to establish a new series, with “R” (piston engine) and “J” (jet-powered) divisions. The “R” class was for civilian competition; the “J” division was for military pilots and was administered by the United States Air Force. Roscoe Turner, the last winner of the pre-war trophy, refused to relinquish it, but the original molds were located, and two additional casts were made, differing only in the legend engraved at the base and by placards identifying the division. Division “R” races were held from 1946 to 1949; Division “J” races (also known as “Military Speed Dashes”) were held from 1951 to 1961, excepting 1952 and 1960.

First flying on August 22, 1931, the Gee Bee Z quickly proved to be tricky to fly, but fulfilled every expectation with regards to its speed. Flown by pilot Lowell Bayles, the Gee Bee Z attained the speed of 267.342 miles per hour (430.245 km/h) at the National Air Races during the Shell Speed Dash qualifying on September 1 then went on to win the Goodyear Trophy race, run over a course of 50 miles (80 km), the next day at an average speed of 205 miles per hour (330 km/h). On the September 5, the aircraft’s engineer, Bob Hall, flew the Gee Bee Z to victory in the General Tire and Rubber Trophy race, then won again the next day in a free-for-all event.

In the Thompson Trophy Race on September 7, Bayles was triumphant, winning with an average speed of 236.24 miles per hour (380.19 km/h), winning over competitors including Jimmy Doolittle, James “Jimmy” Wedell, Ben Howard, Dale Jackson, Bill Ong, Ira Eaker, and Hall, who finished fourth in a Gee Bee Model Y.

Following the Thompson Trophy race, the Gee Bee Z was re-engined with a larger, 750-horsepower (560 kW) Wasp Senior radial, in preparation for an attempt at establishing a world speed record for landplanes at Wayne County Airport in Detroit, Michigan. Unofficially clocked at 314 miles per hour (505 km/h) on a trial run, it surpassed the previous record of 278 miles per hour (447 km/h) by attaining 281.75 miles per hour (453.43 km/h) on December 1, 1931, but the margin was too small for the record to be officially registered.A further record attempt on December 5, 1931, would end in tragedy, the aircraft suffering a wing failure and rolling into the ground, killing Bayles

It was suspected that the Model Z’s crash during a speed run in December 1931 was due to an unexpected failure of the gasoline tank cap, which may have come loose and passed through the windshield. A bullet-proof windscreen and internal fuel caps were part of the new design. Analysis of motion picture film of the event examined frame-by-frame, is inconclusive. Control surface flutter is a more likely cause. It is theorized that the gas cap struck the pilot and incapacitated him, causing a sudden upset in pitch that led to uncontrolled flutter in the right aileron which imparted undue stress on that wing, causing it to pitch up sharply and fail. In addition, tests of a reproduction aircraft have shown that the Gee Bee Z was susceptible to aerodynamic flutter at high speed. The 1932 R-1 and its sister ship, the R-2, were the successors of the previous year’s Thompson Trophy-winning Model Z.

Speedbirds

Wheels Across The Desert!


Egypt 1915

Knights of the Skies


Please note that new German pilots will also be available soon!


Knights of the Skies

American Expeditionary Forces



American Expeditionary Forces

First Sudan War 1884 – 1885



Battle of Gallipoli 1915

First Sudan War


From 1855 what are now known as The Royal Marines, were labeled The Royal Marine Light Infantry. They were to mainly be used in a skirmishing capacity in front of infantry. They were issued gray wool coats and trousers. The foreign service helmets were not stained, but kept white in keeping with the pristine Marine turnout.

The marines were in Gen. Graham’s square at El Teb. At Tamai in 1884 they formed the rear wall of Maj. Davis’s 2nd Brigade square. When the wild Hadenodoa warriors flooded into the square through the gap left by the Black Watch. The rear rank of the marines were compelled to turnabout and fight in both directions. At this time the Marines acted as a breakwater to steady elements of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and the Black Watch as they recovered to retrieve the situation.

The Marines were to take part in most of the major actions throughout the Sudan Campaigns.

First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

Madists


More Mahdist’s are also on the way!

Wars of the Roses


Richard’s most loyal subject was John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk.

The duke had served Richard’s brother for many years and was one of Edward IV’s closer confidantes. He was a military veteran, having fought in the Battle of Towton in 1461 and served as Hastings’ deputy at Calais in 1471

John Howard was slain at the Battle of Bosworth Field on 22 August 1485 along with his friend and patron King Richard. Howard was the commander of the vanguard, and his son, the Earl of Surrey, his lieutenant. Howard was killed when a Lancastrian arrow struck him in the face after the face guard had been torn off his helmet during an earlier altercation with the Earl of Oxford.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

New First Legion September Releases!

August 14th, 2016

Vikings


The next 6
Vikings with VIK006-VIK010 (a and b variant of VIK008). These add more shieldwall figures, a beserker, and a few archers and continue the very high quality we’ve set for this range.    More figures will follow later this year we project or early next at the latest.



Vikings

Swiss Mercenaries


We have the
completion of the Renaissance Swiss Mercenaries release with sets REN039-041 and REN048-050.    These figures add the command and specialist troops to the Swiss Mercenary Pike Block and have the usual characters – Standard Bearer, Officer, Musician, a few Halberdiers, and a stunning crossbowman.    That will bring that release to a close and allow for the creation of the display we use to highlight the release.



Renaissance

Retreat from Russia




Retreat From Russia

Vietnam


The first of the US Marine Corps for our Vietnam figure range including a USMC C-23 Disaster variant of our M48A3 Patton Tank.   The US Army variant of the Patton has already sold out and we don’t expect the USMC variant to last very long either.   To complement the tank we have USMC Infantry both with bases as combat figures and without bases as tank riders much the same as we did with the US Army Variant.   We hope to continue to add USMC figures as the ranges expands. 



Vietnam

New Hobby Master January 2017 Releases!

August 7th, 2016

Modern Aircraft 1:72




Modern Air Power Collection

1:72 Scale




Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:72 & 1:32 Scale.

1:48 Scale




Air Power Collection (Propeller Powered) – 1:48 Scale.

Ground Power




Ground Power Collection

New Thomas Gunn August Releases!

August 7th, 2016

Glory of Rome




Glory of Rome

King and Country August Releases!

August 7th, 2016

The Return of the LONG RANGE DESERT GROUP


Back in 2007, K&C released a small selection of LRDG vehicles and men that helped tell the story of one of the most unusual irregular units the British Army ever spawned …

Originally called “The Long Range Patrol” … it was a reconnaissance and raiding group that was to operate independently far behind the Axis frontlines in North Africa.

The men for this unique unit came from New Zealand, Rhodesia and, of course, British Army battalions and regiments and all were volunteers.

At any one time the LRDG never numbered more than 350 men and contained many colourful characters with equally colourful and often dramatic backgrounds. Among them was …

  • EA113 Lieut Col. John “Jack” Easonsmith
    D.S.O., M.C.
    – John R. Easonsmith, known to his friends as “Jack”, was born in Bristol, England in 1909. He joined his local Territorial Army unit
    in 1939 as a Private and by 1940 had been promoted to Sergeant and recommended for a commission. In December 1940 he was posted to the Middle East and
    volunteered for the Long Range Desert Group. As a Lieutenant he first commanded the New Zealand ‘R1’ Patrol before being promoted to Captain in August 1941. He led the highly successful BARCE RAID which disrupted German and Italian communications as well as putting out of action an Axis airfield there and destroying over 30 enemy aircraft parked around the airstrip. In October 1942
    “Jack” Easonsmith was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in addition to a Military Cross given to him earlier … and promoted to Major. One year later, by now a Lieutenant Colonel, he commanded the entire LRDG during an ill-fated campaign in the Dodacanese Islands off Greece. Here, he was killed in action on November, 1943 during the Battle of Leros. Our figure portrays him during his earlier “Desert Days.”
  • EA114 “Double Trouble” – The men of the LRDG were definitely not “Parade Ground” soldiers. They included in their number many individualists who operated best in small unit operations. Here, an LRDG officer consults his map while his “dismounted” driver examines a captured MP40 “Schmeisser” machine pistol … Their casual and comfortable style of mixed uniforms would give any Regimental Sergeant Major a heart attack!
  • EA115 “LRDG ATTACK JEEP” – This is the first of 2 “Attack Jeeps” K&C are producing. This one mounts a heavy .50 calibre machine gun opposite the front passenger seat and a pair of Vickers .303 machine guns on the back. Plentiful supplies of water and petrol are also carried as well extra ammunition. A 2-man crew completes the set.



Montgomery’s 8th Army




Diorama and Scenic Building Collection

King and Country August Releases!

August 7th, 2016

Desert Village


  • SP036 The Desert Village Wall – The perfect add-on piece to help protect any village setting in the Middle East for virtually any historical period ….. From Biblical times right up to the present day.



Desert Village

FIGHTING GREEKS


Going back many hundreds of years before we return to the time of Ancient Greek Warriors … And their battles against Persians and Trojans.



Ancient Greece

The FALL OF MALAYA, SINGAPORE & HONG KONG


In the early hours of December 8, 1941, the Armed Forces of the Empire of Japan simultaneously invaded the British colonies of Malaya and Hong Kong. Just over nine weeks later they had conquered Malaya, captured Hong Kong and saw the rising sun flag fly over the city of Singapore … In the long history of the
British Empire this was the single biggest defeat ever suffered by military force of arms … and signaled the beginning of the end of Britain in the Far
East. By the time the Japanese entered Singapore they had suffered just 10,000 casualties … British and Empire forces losses totaled over 130,000 ….
killed, wounded and captured. Although, on the British side, there were a myriad of military disasters and blunders there were also many individual acts of
bravery and heroism …. We hope to tell both sides of this fascinating story

  • JN026 Attacking Japanese Officer – ‘Nambu’ pistol in one hand, samurai sword in the other this officer leads his men from the front.
  • JN028 Advancing Japanese Soldier – Moving forward clutching his “Arisaka 99” rifle this Japanese infantryman is already tough and battle-hardened after years of fighting in China …
  • JN029 Advancing Firing Rifle – Another Japanese soldier takes careful aim.
  • JN030 Charging Flagbearer – This infantry NCO has attached a small, personal “good luck” banner to his rifle as he advances on the enemy.
  • JN031 Kneeling Firing – This kneeling soldier also carries a small satchel of his field rations over one shoulder. The Japanese infantry were expected to “live off the Land” for most of their food carrying only the minimum of army-issued rations.
  • JN032 Type 89 Grenade Discharger – The Type 89 was colloquially known as a “Knee Mortar” and was a short-range weapon used for close-in infantry combat in urban as well as jungle warfare. Our
    crawling Japanese Infantryman moves closer to the enemy in order to get maximum results.
  • JN037 Crouching Soldier – With rifle and bayonet this infantryman moves cautiously forward.
  • JN038 “Fight to the Death” – A vicious hand-to-hand combat between a Japanese soldier and his British / Australian / Canadian opponent.
  • JN040 Type 95 “Ha-Go” Light Tank – The Imperial Japanese Army first used this Light Tank during the Sino Japanese War of the mid 1930’s. It was intended to be an infantry support tank and never
    designed to fight other tanks. Mounting a 37mm main gun and 2×7.7mm machine guns it carried a crew of 3 and saw extensive action during the Malayan campaign. This first-released version comes in typical Japanese camouflage … with an open-hatch turret and a Tank commander figure. Just 2,300 were built in 9 different variants.



Invasion of Malaya

WWII – German


For a brief moment the fighting has stopped and this Waffen SS soldier takes the time for a quick cigarette.



Normandy ’44 – Waffen-SS & Wehrmacht

New King and Country August Releases!

August 7th, 2016

RETURN TO ARNHEM


Every August and September each year K&C returns to the battle which took place in and around this Dutch town between 17-26 September 1944. As one of our best known series we have told, in miniature, many different aspects of the battle as it enfolded during those desperate days in the Autumn of 1944. Here, we show some of the British 1st Airborne soldiers that have been captured by the Germans

  • MG067 Arnhem Road Sign – Based on an actual photo this little sign makes a very useful diorama / display piece.
  • MG068 “Under New Ownership” – A captured Airborne Jeep driven by a German soldier ferries 2 x slightly wounded Paras back to a P.O.W. cage. In the front passenger seat seats a watchful guard.
  • MG070 Walking Wounded – A bloodied Glider Pilot sergeant makes his way into German captivity.
  • MG071 “Surrender and Search” – Every captured soldier has to empty his pockets and hand it all to his captors for inspection … Another Glider Pilot goes “into the bag”.
  • MG072 Marching into Captivity – Out of ammunition … food … water … and luck! This Para, hands on head, is marched to the rear accompanied by his Waffen SS captor.
  • MG073 “Comparing Notes” – A Wehrmacht officer shows his map to an NCO to find out where exactly the enemy is …



Operation Market Garden

ROBIN & HIS MERRIE MEN


  • RH012 Will Stutely – Another of Robin’s Merrie Men … this time stringing his long bow.
  • RH013 Arthur a Bland – Arthur was caught red-handed by the Sheriff’s men poaching one of the King’s deer (a hanging offence in those days). Fortunately he managed to escape and found refuge and safety in Sherwood Forest.
  • RH014 Robin in Disguise – One of the most-told tales of the legendary Robin was when, in disguise as a poor tinker, he took part in (and won) an archery contest sponsored by the Sheriff of Nottingham …. Here, Robin, with not a bit of “Lincoln Green” about him, prepares to take a shot at the target.
  • RH019 Archery Targets – A pair of straw-filled targets supported by simple wooden stands await the contestants’ arrows.


Robin Hood

New Versions of Old Favorites


A fresh new look to some still popular figures and sets …

  • HK252M Wonton Seller – Wonton soup and noodles is still a firm favorite with Hong Kong people … a Century before Wonton sellers had portable street stands to offer their delicious, hot bowlfuls to passing customers.
  • HK252G Wonton Seller
  • HK253M Mother & Child – Even just 30 years ago you could still see some Hong Kong mothers carry their infant offspring on their backs as they went about their daily business.
  • HK253G Mother & Child
  • HK263M New Sedan Chair Set – Up until the 1930’s sedan chairs and their passengers were a familiar sight on the streets of Hong Kong … Now long gone alas.
  • HK263G New Sedan Chair Set
  • WS324 “Spoils of War” – A
    young piglet is carried off by a Wehrmacht soldier … Alas for the pig it is not destined to become a pet!
  • WS327 The Apple Thief – This Wehrmacht soldier has come across a box full of apples … Perhaps they fell off the back of a truck …?

New John Jenkins August Releases

July 14th, 2016

jjDESIGNS 10th ANNIVERSARY


For JULY we continue the 10th Anniversary celebrations, with two more sets from the Jacobite Rebellion series.

These sets will only be offered for sale to dealers until the end of AUGUST, or until stock runs out.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Jacobite Rebellion


Nine new French Ecossaie figures will be part of the Chicago Treasure Hunt in September. Here are four of the Nine new figures.



Jacobite Rebellion 1745

Knights of the
Skies


The WW1 German lozenge patterns are some of the most interesting and distinctive camouflage schemes ever devised.

This O.A.W. built Albatros flown by Ltn. FRANZ RAY, was painted all black apart from the fin and rudder. The tailplane’s surfaces were black with two white stripes.

The wings were covered in five colour lozenge fabric.

During the early stages of the Great War, the Germans were looking for a way to effectively camouflage the aircraft of the Luftstreitkräfte to inhibit enemy observation of the aircraft while it was in the air as well as when at rest on the ground. Large, irregular blotches with two or three colors were used on the upper surfaces of the wing which led to the development of the Buntfarbenanstrich, the lozenge camouflage made up of repeating patterns of irregularly shaped four-, five- or six-sided polygons. Because painting such a pattern was very time consuming, and the paint added considerably to the weight of the aircraft, the patterns were printed on fabric, and the fabric was then used to cover the aircraft. This printed fabric was used in various forms and colors from late 1916 until the end of the war.

Lozenge camouflage was a German military camouflage scheme in the form of patterned cloth or painted designs, used by some aircraft in the last two years of World War I.

It takes its name from the repeated polygon shapes incorporated in the designs, many of which resembled lozenges.

In Germany it was called Buntfarbenaufdruck (multi-colored print) but this designation includes other camouflage designs such as Splittermuster and Leibermuster, and does not include hand-painted camouflage.

Some modern German sources refer to lozenge camouflage as Lozenge-Tarnung, as tarnung means concealment, cloaking or camouflage.



Knights Of The Skies – WWI

War of the Roses


Henry recruited several experienced veterans on whom he could rely for military advice and the command of his armies, most notably John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, who was Henry’s principal military commander.

Henry Tudor decided to commit most of his small force into one single large division or “battle” and place it under the command of the Earl of Oxford.



Wars of the Roses 1455-1487

Battle of Monongahela


The first range produced by jjDesigns was The Battle on the Monongahela Series. This mainly consisted of the “luckless,” 44th Regiment of Foot.
The other British Line Regiment at Monongahela was the 48th Regiment of Foot.

The regiment was first raised in 1741 as James Cholmondeley’s Regiment of Foot in Norwich, England during the War of Austrian Succession.

The regiment first saw action at the Battles of Falkirk and Culloden in 1745-1746.

In 1748, it was renumbered as the 48th Regiment of Foot. The 48th took part in the French and Indian War, being part of General Edward Braddock’s ill-fated expedition of 1755.

They received their first battle honour in the Americas at the Battle of Louisburg, although the Regiment did not receive their due honour for this until 1882. The 48th was also part of General James Wolfe’s force at the capture of Quebec in 1759.

As a special 10th Anniversary Release, the 48th Regiment of Foot figures released in 2016, will be available at the original 2006 prices!



Battle of Monongahela, 1755

Lacrosse




Raid on Saint Francis, 1759

Provincial Regiments 1759




Provincial Regiments 1759

Sudan War


From 1855 what are now known as The Royal Marines, were labeled The Royal Marine Light Infantry. They were to mainly be used in a skirmishing capacity in front of infantry. They were issued gray wool coats and trousers. The foreign service helmets were not stained, but kept white in keeping with the pristine Marine turnout.

The marines were in Gen. Graham’s square at El Teb. At Tamai in 1884 they formed the rear wall of Maj. Davis’s 2nd Brigade square. When the wild Hadenodoa warriors flooded into the square through the gap left by the Black Watch. The rear rank of the marines were compelled to turnabout and fight in both directions. At this time the Marines acted as a breakwater to steady elements of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and the Black Watch as they recovered to retrieve the situation.

The Marines were to take part in most of the major actions throughout the Sudan Campaigns.



First Sudan War 1884 – 1885

WWI – British




British Forces

New Corgi September / December Releases!

July 3rd, 2016

European Aircraft



WWII European Theater Bombers & Fighter Planes

War in the Pacific




WWII War in the Pacific

Helicopter




Helicopter Legends

Modern Aircraft




Modern Aircraft and Fighting Vehicles

New Star Trek October/ November Releases!

July 3rd, 2016

Star Trek



Star Trek